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“Must Pass Cyclist” Motorist Mentality – Do cyclists encourage it?

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“Must Pass Cyclist” Motorist Mentality – Do cyclists encourage it?

Old 07-02-15, 02:16 PM
  #276  
jeichelberg87
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And you, whether you admit it or not, are "educating," the world around you when you ride your bicycle.
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Old 07-02-15, 02:52 PM
  #277  
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Kickstart, thanks for helping to condition motorists to proper cyclist lane positioning with your on the road behavior.

Originally Posted by kickstart View Post
Actually I probably ride in the lane more than most here and certainly more than most in my area.
I don't purport to be the final authority in these matters, but I'm pretty sure you just out chest thumped j'berg87!
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Old 07-02-15, 02:54 PM
  #278  
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Originally Posted by Jaywalk3r View Post
If you've been paying attention, it is the personal experience of many, many bicyclists. In fact, the very post you quoted itself quoted another user with the same experience. That didn't fit with your narrative, though, so you predictably ignored it.
Actually, its just that I understand the difference between one individuals experiences, and further quantifying it to be representative of the majority opinion as you do.
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Old 07-02-15, 03:19 PM
  #279  
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Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
Kickstart, thanks for helping to condition motorists to proper cyclist lane positioning with your on the road behavior.



I don't purport to be the final authority in these matters, but I'm pretty sure you just out chest thumped j'berg87!
I'm not bragging, its just what my environment demands and I have few choices. No choice no glory.
I'm glad you think I'm making a positive contribution, but from my perspective its for naught as the residents of a few neighborhoods have proven to be incourageable.
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Old 07-02-15, 06:25 PM
  #280  
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Originally Posted by Jaywalk3r View Post
To be fair, it is very common to see bicyclists show the same lack of respect towards pedestrians on roadways, sidewalks, and (especially) MUPs as motorists have towards bicyclists on roadways.
On a MUP, or a sidewalk, I agree. But on a road, not in the least.
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Old 07-21-15, 08:53 PM
  #281  
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Well let's be fair, the inconsiderate bike riders don't have the right to slow down traffic. Many people I have discussed these things with believe it's the bicyclist that have become arrogant and believe they have more right to the roads than cars. They slow traffic riding 4 wide, they stop at lights blocking cars from making their right turns, they seem to have a general disregard for cars. Whether or not a person in the car has the right to endanger your life, they will win every time they come in contact with you. Personally I have always gone out of my way to give cars the respect they deserve. I am not going to sit in the middle of the right turn lane at a red light holding up traffic when I can easily move to the side. I am not going to ride in traffic and slow things down when I can either wait for traffic to pass, or move over more. All you are doing is allowing the hatred for bicyclist to grow in this persons head until someday he sees and opportunity to get a "bike riders fault" hit on them. Don't naive, there are many people that find bicyclist a pain in the rear.
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Old 07-22-15, 06:18 PM
  #282  
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Originally Posted by evo949 View Post
Well let's be fair, the inconsiderate bike riders don't have the right to slow down traffic. Many people I have discussed these things with believe it's the bicyclist that have become arrogant and believe they have more right to the roads than cars. They slow traffic riding 4 wide, they stop at lights blocking cars from making their right turns, they seem to have a general disregard for cars. Whether or not a person in the car has the right to endanger your life, they will win every time they come in contact with you. Personally I have always gone out of my way to give cars the respect they deserve. I am not going to sit in the middle of the right turn lane at a red light holding up traffic when I can easily move to the side. I am not going to ride in traffic and slow things down when I can either wait for traffic to pass, or move over more. All you are doing is allowing the hatred for bicyclist to grow in this persons head until someday he sees and opportunity to get a "bike riders fault" hit on them. Don't naive, there are many people that find bicyclist a pain in the rear.
1. Define 'inconsiderate bike riders'.
2. Bicycles have been on the road longer than cars.
3. Cyclists' have the right to 'take the lane'.

When I 'take the lane'. I do it to keep from being sandwiched with the edge of the road. Also, A cyclist makes it better for a motorist by being in front of them. So the motorist doesn't have to worry about passing too closely.

Cyclists' should not ride 4-wide. Cyclists stop at a red light, in the straight-right lane. Should go to the left-most position within in the lane. So the vehicles' wanting to turn right, can pass to the right of the cyclist.

Motorists' deserve respect. But so do cyclists'. A close/dangerous pass by a motorist, of a cyclist. Is not respect. That is an ignorant and pious attitude towards' the cyclist.
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Old 07-29-15, 04:27 PM
  #283  
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I think that cyclists who always ride FRAP may encourage the must pass mentality, but I don't think it's the only factor or even the biggest one, and I doubt that always taking the lane would do much to change that mentality in others. In the US, I think larger factors might be "get-there-itis" or a life in the fast lane mentality. I also think it depends on a person's perspective. For instance, I am relatively new to cycling but have been driving for many years. I used to become very irritable while driving when anything or anyone seemed to be an obstacle to my getting to my destination as quickly as possible. I had a bout with illness that helped me to slow down mentally and as a result I am now much more patient as a driver. While I never raged at vulnerable road users, my attitude has changed. I used to feel like cyclists should stay off the road but as a cyclist now I understand that isn't always practical. I am fortunate enough that cycling is a choice for me, not my only option. As far as "get-there-itis", I actually timed my commute several times in the car (after my mental slow-down) and noted that the biggest factor to my getting to work on time was WITHOUT FAIL the time that I left. If there are any lights, any stops, any turns, any rail crossings, etc, you will gain effectively zero time by speeding or being impatient. Certainly your mental health will benefit zero from being in hurry mode constantly. Someone who has never used a car or who was taught to drive by a patient driver or who was raised in a more empathic environment might certainly have a different perspective. I do feel like we should all be able to share the road, ideally, but I don't like riding with or in traffic and will always take a side street or trail or bike lane when available.
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Old 07-30-15, 08:00 AM
  #284  
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Originally Posted by Phamilton View Post
I think that cyclists who always ride FRAP may encourage the must pass mentality, but I don't think it's the only factor or even the biggest one, and I doubt that always taking the lane would do much to change that mentality in others. In the US, I think larger factors might be "get-there-itis" or a life in the fast lane mentality. I also think it depends on a person's perspective. For instance, I am relatively new to cycling but have been driving for many years. I used to become very irritable while driving when anything or anyone seemed to be an obstacle to my getting to my destination as quickly as possible. I had a bout with illness that helped me to slow down mentally and as a result I am now much more patient as a driver. While I never raged at vulnerable road users, my attitude has changed. I used to feel like cyclists should stay off the road but as a cyclist now I understand that isn't always practical. I am fortunate enough that cycling is a choice for me, not my only option. As far as "get-there-itis", I actually timed my commute several times in the car (after my mental slow-down) and noted that the biggest factor to my getting to work on time was WITHOUT FAIL the time that I left. If there are any lights, any stops, any turns, any rail crossings, etc, you will gain effectively zero time by speeding or being impatient. Certainly your mental health will benefit zero from being in hurry mode constantly. Someone who has never used a car or who was taught to drive by a patient driver or who was raised in a more empathic environment might certainly have a different perspective. I do feel like we should all be able to share the road, ideally, but I don't like riding with or in traffic and will always take a side street or trail or bike lane when available.
Really tend to agree... that constant hurry mode coupled with the ability to summon power with a mere flick of the ankle, I think leads to lots of driver frustration... that really should not exist... as you have noted, if you want to get there sooner, you should have left earlier.

I tend to joke that all this "hurry up-itis" came about in the '80s with the advent of everyday fax machines and "absolutely gotta have it next day delivery." The work world went nuts, deadlines were shortened, Gantt charts without weekends or holidays became the rage and all the rats raced a bit harder to reach the same old goals while managers cracked the whip louder. The end result... everyone feels the need to get there now. Never mind that physics and crowded streets make this impossible.
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Old 07-30-15, 08:39 AM
  #285  
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Originally Posted by genec View Post
I tend to joke that all this "hurry up-itis" came about in the '80s with the advent of everyday fax machines and "absolutely gotta have it next day delivery." The work world went nuts, deadlines were shortened, Gantt charts without weekends or holidays became the rage and all the rats raced a bit harder to reach the same old goals while managers cracked the whip louder. The end result... everyone feels the need to get there now. Never mind that physics and crowded streets make this impossible.
The funny thing is that when a package/letter must get across town ASAP in many cities they call the bicycle messenger!
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