Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Advocacy & Safety
Reload this Page >

The sandwiched bicycle lane. Safe enough for early morning?

Notices
Advocacy & Safety Cyclists should expect and demand safe accommodation on every public road, just as do all other users. Discuss your bicycle advocacy and safety concerns here.

The sandwiched bicycle lane. Safe enough for early morning?

Old 07-12-17, 08:44 PM
  #1  
JohnX
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 89
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
The sandwiched bicycle lane. Safe enough for early morning?

Sadly, not for Robert Allen Shepherd, even with the reflective vest. I used to ride a lane like this sometimes in Jacksonville and found it disconcerting to have speeding traffic on both sides of you, with one of those lanes for a turn off up ahead. Including an overhead shot of the fatality area. One of the reasons i post this information is so people will be involved with DOT in their state when new roads are designed or redone, to make safe areas to ride.

5:30 a.m. just seems dangerous to me; maybe any time with this type of bike lane.

Bicyclist, 62, killed in hit-and-run crash on Ulmerton Road | Tampa Bay Times

https://www.google.com/maps/@27.8940...!3m1!1e3?hl=en

EDIT

My googles maps overhead clip was a little west of where the bicycle was; i can see now why i think the accident occurred. the bicycle lane has to make a jog from the side of the road across a lane of traffic where it reappears between two lanes. wonder what genius planner designed that death trap.

Last edited by JohnX; 07-13-17 at 08:43 AM.
JohnX is offline  
Old 07-13-17, 01:58 AM
  #2  
coominya
Senior Member
 
coominya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Brisbane Aust
Posts: 1,643

Bikes: Giant ToughRoad Giant talon

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 704 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
A cyclist killed by traffic on a 6 lane highway? I don't believe it, fake news.
coominya is offline  
Old 07-13-17, 09:00 PM
  #3  
GeneralZod
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnX View Post

5:30 a.m. just seems dangerous to me; maybe any time with this type of bike lane.
I don't think the bike lane design is unsafe, myself. This looks like a road that is at least sometimes very busy, granted. The idea is to keep the through-moving bicyclist out of the turn lane.

I rode a road segment a lot like this for several years. It wasn't my favorite thing but it was a shot of adrenaline and it was manageable. It was *very* busy when I was on it and traffic would move at 30+ often. There was no bike lane, though. For a stretch that was a bit longer than the bit in the Google picture the right lane was like a turn lane. At the beginning of the right lane, that right lane received right-turning traffic coming off of a major boulevard. Then that right lane became an on-ramp to a freeway after the boulevard crossed under the freeway. So, there was always a lot of moving in and out of that right lane on the segment. I didn't want to be in the right lane since I wasn't getting onto the freeway.

I'd take the section by moving as fast as I could in the right side of the next-to-rightmost lane. That's pretty much where the bike lane is on this road in the picture. 20+ or faster when I could, and I often could. That was good enough to hold a kind of position and not surprise people moving from the right lane to first through lane to avoid the freeway entrance. It also kept me clear of people switching from my lane into the freeway entrance lane. I had to keep on my toes and, as I said, when I went through I went as quickly as I could. People who just didn't want the short delay of being behind me in my line could always switch over to next lane to the left.

I could have just moved to the right turn lane and stayed there until close to the time to merge. But I wasn't in that lane to begin with. Also, being able to push forward at the best speed I could without having to try to pick a spot to merge into on my left myself was just more comfortable.

From what the article says, it appears the rider got hit from behind. I don't know why that accident prospect would be less likely for someone who rode in the right turn lane until the last minute on this road, unfortunately. And someone in the right lane might get hit if he or she were trying to merge over at the last minute.

In darkness in traffic on a busy road two blinkies and a vest is what I feel comfortable with. If visibility and not inviting lane sharing wouldn't work on this road segment then I think the problem isn't the position of the bike lane. I'm sorry to hear about this rider, though, to be sure.
GeneralZod is offline  
Old 07-13-17, 10:04 PM
  #4  
scott967
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Oahu, HI
Posts: 1,352

Bikes: 89 Paramount OS 84 Fuji Touring Series III New! 2013 Focus Izalco Ergoride

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 266 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 57 Times in 44 Posts
I have that style of bike lane all the time. And in Florida, (at least in Tampa/St Pete/Clearwater) it is everywhere, in particular US19. IMO I think it is about as good a configuration as can be expected. I used to commute at 0530 and don't think there is anything abnormal about it. When you are on the road, you can get hit and hit-and-run seems all too common in motor vehicle<>bicycle incidents.

I have to say WRT US19, I see most cyclists on the sidewalk, not in the bike lane. At least in Pasco County, the bike lane tends to "disappear" at intervals I guess when the roadway is considered too narrow. That being said, I think Florida DOT is miles ahead of eg, Alabama in providing safe areas for cyclists (If you doubt me just take US19 north and see what happens after you cross the AL line). I have yet to see an AL federal or state highway that has a paved shoulder, and if it does, isn't destroyed with rumble strips.

scott s.
.
scott967 is offline  
Old 07-13-17, 10:44 PM
  #5  
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Posts: 7,239
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 659 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Quite common around here (SF East Bay area) as well although they tend to be shorter. I wouldn't expect the risk to be particularly high at 5:30 a.m. - too early for much traffic congestion and late enough for the bar crowd to be sleeping it off somewhere. Unfortunate and tragic that Mr. Shepherd encountered a negligent driver - hope they find some evidence to identify him.
prathmann is offline  
Old 07-13-17, 11:32 PM
  #6  
Chris0516
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Washington Grove, Maryland
Posts: 1,466

Bikes: 2003 (24)20-Speed Specialized Allez'

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 396 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
I have seen a few bike lanes like that around the region. Where the bike lane is between the right-turn lane, and the outside straight lane. On a six-lane divided road. I found them unnerving.
Chris0516 is offline  
Old 07-14-17, 01:37 AM
  #7  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 27,268
Mentioned: 215 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16717 Post(s)
Liked 3,722 Times in 2,762 Posts
Originally Posted by coominya View Post
A cyclist killed by traffic on a 6 lane highway? I don't believe it, fake news.
8 lanes in many places...

Originally Posted by JohnX View Post
i can see now why i think the accident occurred. the bicycle lane has to make a jog from the side of the road across a lane of traffic where it reappears between two lanes. wonder what genius planner designed that death trap.
Those "Jogs" are relatively common. Usually they are marked with green paint to designate a bike crossing. Although, the dotted lines seem to indicate that the planners expected bikes to choose the best time to cross (at their own risk) which might be OK in light traffic, but not in heavy traffic. Make sure it is marked and publicized that cars are to yield to bikes.

Around here an "exit only" lane will also be marked with short dashes between lanes.

I never like those sandwich lanes. Perhaps one issue is that they should be made wider than a normal bike lane. So, I tend to like to ride to the right in a bike lane. Put me in the sandwich lane, and one has to ride right down the middle (assuming the pavement is good). Thus one ends up closer to traffic on both sides. Perhaps make them 6 feet wide, and mark with green paint to indicate that it isn't a driving lane. Also, if there is space, there is no real reason to end the bike lane early other than discouraging cyclists from cutting across at the last moment. In some cases, I choose to do a right turn anyway.

Man, what a mess. I can't say that road would be high up on my list of favorite places to ride.

We have a 4-lane road here in Springfield which actually has an old rails to trails conversion right down the middle. North-South in the link below.

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.0604.../data=!3m1!1e3

It isn't bad to ride on, if they only designed bike signals separate from pedestrian signals. I generally watch the bus signals for the new parallel bus lane, and go when buses have a "go" signal.

It would take some redesigning, but Ulmerton Road above could be configured similarly. Perhaps reduce the number of legal left turn crossings, and force turning vehicles to do U-turns at the next signal.

Another option that is sometimes done on large roads like Ulmerton Road is to add frontage roads on both sides of the road. I'm not sure how traffic controls are handled. But, that may be the first step towards converting a road with too much traffic to a limited access highway.

The other thing I would probably do is to put bike lanes along 126th Ave N, and connect up all the gaps with a single lane bike lane. It would take some work and funding to put together, but there are some very large housing developments that would benefit from a good East/West path that wasn't on Ulmerton Road.

Lots of ways the city/state could improve bike safety in places like this. But, perhaps Florida is content with leading the nation for bicycle fatalities.
CliffordK is online now  
Old 07-14-17, 07:03 AM
  #8  
bikecrate
Senior Member
 
bikecrate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: LF, APMAT
Posts: 2,739
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 611 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 366 Times in 210 Posts
Unfortunately, this is pretty typical for this area. Ulmerton has to be one of the busiest roads in Pinellas Co. It has multiple lanes, many cross streets, and tons of business entrances and exits. This is probably the best design they could do for that kind of road. What I wish the traffic planners would do is find some way to use secondary roads combined with pathways for cyclist to use for navigating through the urban/suburban areas.
bikecrate is offline  
Old 07-14-17, 11:51 AM
  #9  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 27,268
Mentioned: 215 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16717 Post(s)
Liked 3,722 Times in 2,762 Posts
Originally Posted by bikecrate View Post
Unfortunately, this is pretty typical for this area. Ulmerton has to be one of the busiest roads in Pinellas Co. It has multiple lanes, many cross streets, and tons of business entrances and exits. This is probably the best design they could do for that kind of road. What I wish the traffic planners would do is find some way to use secondary roads combined with pathways for cyclist to use for navigating through the urban/suburban areas.
Of course, bikes, especially commuters often have to go to the same destinations that cars go to. But, I would think this would also be indicative of issues that could be improved with a little better public planning.

Perhaps get the regional governments (county?) to develop a commission to develop new cycling infrastructure. Possibly also try to get state level involvement.

One of the problems is retro-fitting cycling infrastructure into regions previously built up without it. And, also catering to the "through cyclists".

A natural place for bike paths is along rivers, canals, wetlands, and greenways. There is a canal that crosses going southwest very near the accident site, as well as quite a few other canals and waterways. The advantage of these areas is that they naturally have few road crossings, and many of the existing road crossings have bridges that could support a path under them. Also the areas can be very pleasant park-like areas.

Along freeways is also another natural area for bike paths. Already public right-of-ways, with limited road crossings, and often bridges, overpasses, and underpasses that can be utilized for bikes.

In that part of Tampa, very few of the secondary roads going east/west seem to go through which is part of the reason Ulmerton gets slammed with traffic. Many cyclists don't ride very far, so perhaps this isn't a huge issue, but there are always those through cyclists. As mentioned above, the pieces of 126th Ave N could be connected for bikes only to make a through bike path, while not making it a through road for cars.

A more ambitious project might be to try to punch 130th Ave N through. It appears to largely follow property borders and greenways. It would be a more ambitious project, but the result would be a much more isolated bikeway.

Of course, these are only a few areas in a huge metro area. And, perhaps also a statewide issue. But, Florida appears as if it could be a cyclist's paradise. Unfortunately roads like Ulmerton make me cringe. Ok, so I have ridden on busy streets before. But at least cities like Portland are making efforts to improve cycling safety and infrastructure.
CliffordK is online now  
Old 07-14-17, 01:21 PM
  #10  
JohnX
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 89
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I guess we could be "relevant" as is talked about in one of the other posts. which i interpret "relevant" as meaning ride in the middle of a car lane. maybe i'm reading relevant wrong, but i think that is the idea. but it would take some real thought for me to ride in the middle of the right car lane on that six lane road.
JohnX is offline  
Old 07-14-17, 01:27 PM
  #11  
bikecrate
Senior Member
 
bikecrate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: LF, APMAT
Posts: 2,739
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 611 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 366 Times in 210 Posts
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Of course, bikes, especially commuters often have to go to the same destinations that cars go to. But, I would think this would also be indicative of issues that could be improved with a little better public planning.

Perhaps get the regional governments (county?) to develop a commission to develop new cycling infrastructure. Possibly also try to get state level involvement.

One of the problems is retro-fitting cycling infrastructure into regions previously built up without it. And, also catering to the "through cyclists".

A natural place for bike paths is along rivers, canals, wetlands, and greenways. There is a canal that crosses going southwest very near the accident site, as well as quite a few other canals and waterways. The advantage of these areas is that they naturally have few road crossings, and many of the existing road crossings have bridges that could support a path under them. Also the areas can be very pleasant park-like areas.

Along freeways is also another natural area for bike paths. Already public right-of-ways, with limited road crossings, and often bridges, overpasses, and underpasses that can be utilized for bikes.

In that part of Tampa, very few of the secondary roads going east/west seem to go through which is part of the reason Ulmerton gets slammed with traffic. Many cyclists don't ride very far, so perhaps this isn't a huge issue, but there are always those through cyclists. As mentioned above, the pieces of 126th Ave N could be connected for bikes only to make a through bike path, while not making it a through road for cars.

A more ambitious project might be to try to punch 130th Ave N through. It appears to largely follow property borders and greenways. It would be a more ambitious project, but the result would be a much more isolated bikeway.

Of course, these are only a few areas in a huge metro area. And, perhaps also a statewide issue. But, Florida appears as if it could be a cyclist's paradise. Unfortunately roads like Ulmerton make me cringe. Ok, so I have ridden on busy streets before. But at least cities like Portland are making efforts to improve cycling safety and infrastructure.
Good points...in Tampa the secondary roads get broken up by the Hillsborough River, the interstate system, strip centers and mismatched roads from neighborhood to neighborhood. It would be great if planners could sit down and, using some existing secondary roads, "punch" some holes through these obstacles to connect the roads together. Sometimes a path of a block or two here and there would be a help. Adding bike lanes to these hyper roads to me is not much of a solution.

A little tidbit I've heard about Ulmerton. It was originally supposed to be a straight through express, so drivers could move quickly east/west across Pinellas Co. However, the developers heard about it and said "nope... we want drivers to stop, eat, shop and buy gas." So that is why it is the big traffic clogged mess it is today.
bikecrate is offline  
Old 07-14-17, 01:51 PM
  #12  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 8,553

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn, Lakitu

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4904 Post(s)
Liked 1,727 Times in 956 Posts
We've got a couple of these sandwiched lanes now, and let me tell you-- it beats the hell out of what we had before, which was nothing. My hometown is completely bracketed by freeways, so if you ride more than 4-5 miles in any direction, you will have to cross under/over a freeway. The traffic in the freeway-close areas is of the particularly dense and angry variety, so I am much happier to take my chances in a bike lane than I am to try to filter into traffic with drivers who are willing to murder anything that strays in front of them.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 07-14-17, 03:06 PM
  #13  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 27,268
Mentioned: 215 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16717 Post(s)
Liked 3,722 Times in 2,762 Posts
I found this map.

https://www.pinellascounty.org/mpo/pd...cycleLanes.pdf

There do appear to be quite a few "planned" paths, including a proposed off-street trail that takes off right about at the above accident site, and heads northwest a bit, then cuts across an odd greenway halfway between Ulmerton Road and 142nd street.

So, it may be time to light a few fires to get those paths built.
CliffordK is online now  
Old 07-14-17, 03:08 PM
  #14  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 5,722

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 2007 Dahon Boardwalk, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International, 2006 Felt F65

Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1296 Post(s)
Liked 1,402 Times in 702 Posts
I don't know enough about the circumstances, but usually the "jog" in the bike lane from "outside" to "sandwiched" inside the turn lane is accompanied by diagonal parallel dotted lines. If you scroll the Google map to the right you see the bike lane "jumps" from outside to sandwiched with some sort of non-diagonal, dashed discontinuity where the side road meets the main road.

But I don't know enough to know if the jumping lane or side road had something to do with it, or not but you can tell by the photos the position of the overhead power lines and that places him close to that spot.

If you read down, it appears the cyclist was hit by a second vehicle after he was already down in the street. It is inconclusive whether the first vehicle killed him outright.

Also, authorities recovered a side mirror they believe came off the vehicle that struck the cyclist. They have the type of vehicle narrowed down, and it would be interesting to know which side of the vehicle the mirror came from.

And while the article mentioned the deceased was wearing a reflective vest, it doesn't mention lighting. I can't discern from the photos whether the bike had lights, and if it did they may have been knocked off. Also, the cyclist could have had lights on his helmet, but again this was not mentioned. Plus, even if the cyclist and his bike had lights, they may have been made innoperable by the first collision, rendering the bike and rider nearly invisible, especially laying horizontal in the roadway at dawn.

In any event this is a tragedy, and a crime as the first driver who collided fled the scene.

My heart goes out to the family of the cyclist, Robert Allen Shepherd of St.Petersburg.
BobbyG is offline  
Old 07-14-17, 03:23 PM
  #15  
cellery
Senior Member
 
cellery's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 783
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
This is a totally normal configuration for where I live. I've never considered them to any more particularly dangerous than your average curb hugging bike lane. But I generally try to be as environmentally aware as possible. I've had city buses come up to me side by side - one on the right, one on the left in one of these types of lanes. It is definiteyl disconcerting. In the scenarios where I feel it might be possible to get sandwiched in by traffic, I try to adjust me speed to create gaps where I am not surrounded. But then I try not to ride on such roads during high traffic - that does NOT seem safe to me.
cellery is offline  
Old 07-14-17, 04:20 PM
  #16  
SylvainG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Ottawa,ON,Canada
Posts: 1,270

Bikes: Schwinn Miranda 1990, Giant TCX 2 2012

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 486 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 7 Posts
If you start from here in street view and move a few steps forward, you can see the Google car doing an illegal line change into the bike line to turn right. This is what I don't like about this type of configuration and might have caused the collision here. I have to use one like this (the bike line is no longer on the right side at first) but luckily for me, I turn at that intersection so through traffic is stopped at the light and I can get to the next light before they reach me.
SylvainG is offline  
Old 07-15-17, 05:33 AM
  #17  
JohnX
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 89
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by SylvainG View Post
If you start from here in street view and move a few steps forward, you can see the Google car doing an illegal line change into the bike line to turn right. This is what I don't like about this type of configuration and might have caused the collision here. I have to use one like this (the bike line is no longer on the right side at first) but luckily for me, I turn at that intersection so through traffic is stopped at the light and I can get to the next light before they reach me.

Interesting observation. The google car does cross the bike lane just as it would a regular car lane. Which leads me to believe that these lanes need to be straddled on both sides by meaningful bumps or flags or something that physically reminds car drivers they can't go there. And your local example looks similar. The lane just goes away. And reappears later between lanes.
JohnX is offline  
Old 07-15-17, 06:32 AM
  #18  
JohnX
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 89
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Looking at the Google maps again made me realize something. There was a path that could have been taken on a sidewalk over a bridge to avoid the '"jog" over the turn lane-so i have to give planners credit for that. and looking at the picture of the crash site, i do think this is very, very close to where the accident took place. but you would have to think about it if you weren't aware of it on a bicycle. I know a lot of bicyclists don't like to take what are perceived as sidewalks but if they are wide enough i take them every time.

https://www.google.com/maps/@27.8940...2!8i6656?hl=en
JohnX is offline  
Old 07-15-17, 09:10 AM
  #19  
SylvainG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Ottawa,ON,Canada
Posts: 1,270

Bikes: Schwinn Miranda 1990, Giant TCX 2 2012

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 486 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnX View Post
Interesting observation. The google car does cross the bike lane just as it would a regular car lane. Which leads me to believe that these lanes need to be straddled on both sides by meaningful bumps or flags or something that physically reminds car drivers they can't go there. And your local example looks similar. The lane just goes away. And reappears later between lanes.
These grooves on the road like they have on the side of highways to wake up fallen asleep drivers would be a good idea in my opinion to warn drivers not to venture there. OTOH, cyclists would have to be careful not to hit one (or a few) because they could cause them to loose control...
SylvainG is offline  
Old 07-15-17, 02:28 PM
  #20  
scott967
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Oahu, HI
Posts: 1,352

Bikes: 89 Paramount OS 84 Fuji Touring Series III New! 2013 Focus Izalco Ergoride

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 266 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 57 Times in 44 Posts
Originally Posted by SylvainG View Post
These grooves on the road like they have on the side of highways to wake up fallen asleep drivers would be a good idea in my opinion to warn drivers not to venture there. OTOH, cyclists would have to be careful not to hit one (or a few) because they could cause them to loose control...
That's the last thing I would want. I ride that style of bike lane all the time and have zero issues with it. Yes, cars entering the right turn lane cross the bike lane. For whatever reason, it does seem like cars prefer to pass me on the left, then enter the turn lane ahead of me rather than enter the turn lane behind me. I assume they get nervous about having a cyclist on the left of them.

scott s.
.
scott967 is offline  
Old 07-15-17, 03:03 PM
  #21  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 27,268
Mentioned: 215 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16717 Post(s)
Liked 3,722 Times in 2,762 Posts
I have no problem with cars pulling across the lane as long as they aren't running over bikes doing so. I often stay right if I'm turning right, or sometimes get close to the intersection before signalling and pulling left.

I'm not sure it is illegal for cars to cross the lane, unless posted (I've seen freeways where it is posted "illegal to cross double white line" at exits). But, most bike lanes aren't marked with a double line either.
CliffordK is online now  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
wipekitty
Advocacy & Safety
30
11-10-18 07:52 PM
Sam00000111111
General Cycling Discussion
8
06-20-18 06:33 AM
The Human Car
Advocacy & Safety
7
06-13-11 06:11 PM
randya
Advocacy & Safety
26
05-11-11 09:04 AM
Rocket-Sauce
Road Cycling
11
03-14-10 03:00 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2022 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.