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New York City Cycling -- CRAZY!!!

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New York City Cycling -- CRAZY!!!

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Old 12-03-18, 02:38 AM
  #26  
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Blogger BSNYC also does a daily bike report on transportation alternatives that highlights bike lane follies.

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Old 12-03-18, 06:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Dahon.Steve View Post
The bike lanes are not that bad! They are bad if you intend to ride above 10 mph! I use them for kick scooting with my Xootr and very rarely have issues because I'm slow. The person in the YouTube video makes it look far worse because that's his intention! He purposely rode fast in the bike lane with people all around the sidewalk to create controversy and get more hits to his video. More views means more money. It's actually very safe if you are slow and you're not making a YouTube video for profit.
10mph That's slow as .....

Bikes are a form of transportation for some of us, not recreation. Can't be plodding along at 10mph...You can't even win the NYC marathon at that speed.


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Old 12-03-18, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by work4bike View Post
10mph That's slow as .....

Bikes are a form of transportation for some of us, not recreation. Can't be plodding along at 10mph...You can't even win the NYC marathon at that speed.


.
I've done lots of commutes at 10 mph even at 10 km/h. What's the rush? That's the beauty of bicycle commuting. You have the chpuce of going as slowly as you want and still enjoy the ride and nobody's going to push you to go faster.
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Old 12-06-18, 07:07 PM
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I've been commuting for about 5 years, mix of path and streets. I'm very comfortable in traffic so driving or cycling in the city is NBD but without a doubt it requires a high degree of situational awareness. Generally it's not as bad as the stories would suggest. Most drivers are fairly predictable. But sometimes...sheesh. Not for the faint of heart.
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Old 12-07-18, 09:19 AM
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Well put, @ascherer .
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Old 12-07-18, 09:23 AM
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Big fan of Terry Barensten's HotLine series YouTube videos flying through NYC (and others) on fixies. Anybody else watch these? Some serious skills...
Also enjoy Kelsey Leigh's videos as a NYC bike messenger. She's pretty good too.
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Old 12-07-18, 10:27 AM
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I'll check those out, as I haven't seen them. But you do not need a crazy-high level of skill to survive here. As I said previously, there are plenty of inexperienced cyclists, some of them old, who ride here regularly.
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Old 12-07-18, 12:00 PM
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Tell someone from the midwest why anyone would want to live in that snake pit full of rude people.
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Old 12-07-18, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by CB HI View Post
You do understand that NYC has a mandatory bike lane law, right. And NYPD seems more than happy to write tickets to cyclist for not being in the bike lane or not having a bell.
Wow, that sucks. Los Angeles just put in a protected bike lane on the street that I used to use. After they set it up, I used it once. Never again. We don't have the same density of pedestrians, of course, but they still wander into the lane. Worse, delivery trucks, ride-share cars, and just general regular cars use it for parking or stopping. They don't have the curb up yet, so you can drift out of the lane, but there are usually cars parked (that's our "protection" until they install the cement curbs). I don't think we have the same law.
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Old 12-07-18, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Dahon.Steve View Post
He purposely rode fast in the bike lane with people all around the sidewalk to create controversy and get more hits to his video. More views means more money.
**** doenst work like that
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Old 12-07-18, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by rydabent View Post
Tell someone from the midwest why anyone would want to live in that snake pit full of rude people.
Speaking of rude, I learned when I was a kid that it's rude to insult someone's home. Then I learned that some people make an exception to that rule when talking about New York. It doesn't make any sense to me. It's just something I've observed.

I would tell you about how truly rude behavior here isn't that common, but might not believe me.
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Old 12-07-18, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Speaking of rude, I learned when I was a kid that it's rude to insult someone's home. Then I learned that some people make an exception to that rule when talking about New York. It doesn't make any sense to me. It's just something I've observed.

I would tell you about how truly rude behavior here isn't that common, but might not believe me.
I'm from the midwest and I've enjoyed my visits to NYC. I think what midwesterners and southerners interpret as rude is actually just people being no-nonsense and straight to the point. I appreciate that. I hate having to waste time with pleasantries and small talk about things I honestly don't care about before getting to the point.

Nebraska, on the other hand...
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Old 12-07-18, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Chinghis View Post
Wow, that sucks. Los Angeles just put in a protected bike lane on the street that I used to use. After they set it up, I used it once. Never again. We don't have the same density of pedestrians, of course, but they still wander into the lane. Worse, delivery trucks, ride-share cars, and just general regular cars use it for parking or stopping. They don't have the curb up yet, so you can drift out of the lane, but there are usually cars parked (that's our "protection" until they install the cement curbs). I don't think we have the same law.
I think Ca law is a little vague, as the Streets & Highway code defines "bikeway" with four classes:

class I - bike path
class II - bike lane
class III - bike route
class iv - cycle track

In the Vehicle Code, if a "bike lane" exists, cycles must use it if they are traveling under the prevailing speed. But your "protected lane" would seem to be a class iv bikeway, not class ii.

I know when I lived there I was stopped by a Ventura County cop for not riding in a marked "bike path" (which was actually the sidewalk) on Victoria in Ventura.

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Old 12-08-18, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Speaking of rude, I learned when I was a kid that it's rude to insult someone's home. Then I learned that some people make an exception to that rule when talking about New York. It doesn't make any sense to me. It's just something I've observed.

I would tell you about how truly rude behavior here isn't that common, but might not believe me.
As a technician I attended many training classes. Almost to a one the people from New York City were total rude know it alls. OTOH the guys from up state NY were normal people.

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Old 12-09-18, 01:54 AM
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Originally Posted by scott967 View Post
I think Ca law is a little vague, as the Streets & Highway code defines "bikeway" with four classes:

class I - bike path
class II - bike lane
class III - bike route
class iv - cycle track

In the Vehicle Code, if a "bike lane" exists, cycles must use it if they are traveling under the prevailing speed. But your "protected lane" would seem to be a class iv bikeway, not class ii.

I know when I lived there I was stopped by a Ventura County cop for not riding in a marked "bike path" (which was actually the sidewalk) on Victoria in Ventura.

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Cool, thanks. I should look more carefully. Maybe I'll just stick to streets without bike lanes!
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Old 12-09-18, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by work4bike View Post
10mph That's slow as .....

Bikes are a form of transportation for some of us, not recreation. Can't be plodding along at 10mph...You can't even win the NYC marathon at that speed.


.
10 mph is close to my normal speed. It's faster than driving and gets me to work on time.
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Old 12-09-18, 09:30 AM
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Man, some people just love to complain. Yes, pedestrians are still figuring out bike lanes. Change takes time. Chill out.

I love riding in NYC. I don’t live there but my folks do, and I ride there about once or twice a year for the past 15 years. It is one of my greatest joys on a bike. And I feel safer riding there than in many suburbs or even many country highways.
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Old 12-10-18, 09:10 AM
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It's funny how some people like riding here in NYC. I grew up here, and I generally don't find it to be the nicest place to ride. Yet I know some people who make a trip into the city just to ride here. I also know people who live here (such as @ascherer and @wilfried ) who are great at making adventurous routes within the city limits. I've gone with them sometimes, and I did have some great times, but all things being equal, I'd rather be on a country road, at least for a fun ride. Maybe I wouldn't like commuting on a country road. I don't know.

Suburban riding can be bad, depending on road design. Traffic can be dense, and people are impatient. I lived in New Jersey suburbs for 26 years.
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Old 12-10-18, 09:55 AM
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The last time I rode in the suburbs, I went back to secondary roads I'd ridden for decades on the North Shore of Long Island. I was a bit startled at how close and fast many people passed and the preponderance of SUVs. I found that odd given all my city riding, but there it is. I love the quiet backroads of New England, and I love the adventures of riding to destinations around the city. Best of both worlds.
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Old 12-10-18, 01:14 PM
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Originally Posted by ascherer View Post
The last time I rode in the suburbs, I went back to secondary roads I'd ridden for decades on the North Shore of Long Island. I was a bit startled at how close and fast many people passed and the preponderance of SUVs.

I found that odd given all my city riding, but there it is.

I love the quiet backroads of New England, and I love the adventures of riding to destinations around the city. Best of both worlds.
FYA, I recently posted to this Commuting thread, Have you given up the car?, in the context of Living Car Free or Light, but for me:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Welcome to Boston and environs; I love riding in and around this town. I'm a year round commuter from Kenmore Square downtown to 14 miles southwest of Boston and an occasional centurian
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Very nicely, @Steely Dan , you describe IMO a third "compartment of Metropolitan urban living, those town centers / inner suburbs, and for walkability / livability, they follow suit with the central city, essentially dependent on the regional mass transit.

In Boston; Brookline, Cambridge, and Newton, etc are examples. In fact the prosperous inner suburb of Newton is said to be a coalescence of nine villages each served by a light rail / Commuter Rail stop.

The aerial view you posted of Boston included the Town Center of Roslindale, a neighborhood in Boston City Proper, and nicely serviced by bus and Commuter Rail. In fact, "Rozzie" is about midway on my cycle commute to an outer Boston suburb where I work, 14 miles from home. Having a reverse commuter route is a nice situation.

From my limited Chicago experience, Lincoln Park and Oak Park seem to be such. In Detroit, there are nice inner, and slightly removed walkable suburbs such as the Grosse Pointes, Royal Oak, and Birmingham, but they lack a good regional mass transit.

So besides the first compartment of Metropolitan urban living, downtown, city proper; the second of “outer” suburbs; the third of inner suburbs / town centers, I think there is also a fourth “compartment” of Metropolitan urban living.

I call exurbia; less walkable, and at the periphery of the regional mass transit, but good for road cycling.I can be in Boston’s exurbia in about one hour on a training ride, and
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
… On a happier note, the Transportation Authority (MBTA) allows bikes on subways and commuter trains [and buses] with certain restrictions and that's a nice way to get out of town without city riding. MBTA > Riding the T > Bikes on the T
And then there is rural; not walkable (to get somewhere) and with no mass transit…say no more.

For me, ...
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
...I am occasionally asked by suburban colleagues who live closer to work, why I don’t move out there from downtown. My reply is that for cycling purposes, the distance and routes are perfect, meanwhile thinking to myself, Why do you think they call it ‘sub-urban’ living (like ‘sub-human’)”?
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
...I once heard a quote to the effect that, “I like living in the City, and though I don’t go to the Opera, I like knowing it’s there.
The outer suburbs and exurbia are too far from the Opera.

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Old 12-11-18, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Daniel4 View Post
I've done lots of commutes at 10 mph even at 10 km/h. What's the rush? That's the beauty of bicycle commuting. You have the chpuce of going as slowly as you want and still enjoy the ride and nobody's going to push you to go faster.
Unless, of course, you actually have to be somewhere on time, and somewhere else after that.

Sure, i could ride at walking speed ... but then I'd have to get up at 2:30 a.m. or something. And if (as it was for along while) I have classes after work, well ... I'd have to cancel all my classes so i could "enjoy the ride." (Actually, I used to enjoy going fast and riding hard .... but I was not old and fat then.)

But ... cycling for transport means needing to meet schedules. Getting to the store after it closes, getting to class after it's over, getting to work late .... Maybe if your daily commute is only five miles, it doesn't matter, but if you are looking at 30-50 miles per day, plus time at work, plus time at classes, and want to get home in time to eat and sleep enough to do it again the next day ... yeah, dawdling is not really an option.
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Old 12-11-18, 07:42 AM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
It's funny how some people like riding here in NYC. I grew up here, and I generally don't find it to be the nicest place to ride. Yet I know some people who make a trip into the city just to ride here. I also know people who live here ... who are great at making adventurous routes within the city limits. I've gone with them sometimes, and I did have some great times, but all things being equal, I'd rather be on a country road, at least for a fun ride. Maybe I wouldn't like commuting on a country road. I don't know.
I ride mostly empty country roads. It's wonderful and definitely the preferred setting for me. But I like riding busy urban streets because I don't do it that often. It's more fun, I think, when you don't do it frequently as the novelty factor is high.
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Old 12-11-18, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by jon c. View Post
I ride mostly empty country roads. It's wonderful and definitely the preferred setting for me. But I like riding busy urban streets because I don't do it that often. It's more fun, I think, when you don't do it frequently as the novelty factor is high.
You could find it invigorating, for sure. My friend from New Jersey and her husband and daughter took a trip to Shanghai, and they rented bikes and rode around the city. She said traffic was crazy. Her daughter, then around 11 years old, said it was relaxing, but perhaps she really meant invigorating. Now the kid is at City College of New York, so maybe city life is her calling.
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Old 12-11-18, 10:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Unless, of course, you actually have to be somewhere on time, and somewhere else after that.

Sure, i could ride at walking speed ... but then I'd have to get up at 2:30 a.m. or something. And if (as it was for along while) I have classes after work, well ... I'd have to cancel all my classes so i could "enjoy the ride." (Actually, I used to enjoy going fast and riding hard .... but I was not old and fat then.)

But ... cycling for transport means needing to meet schedules. Getting to the store after it closes, getting to class after it's over, getting to work late .... Maybe if your daily commute is only five miles, it doesn't matter, but if you are looking at 30-50 miles per day, plus time at work, plus time at classes, and want to get home in time to eat and sleep enough to do it again the next day ... yeah, dawdling is not really an option.
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