Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Advocacy & Safety
Reload this Page >

Dog Bite First Aid for Remote Rides

Notices
Advocacy & Safety Cyclists should expect and demand safe accommodation on every public road, just as do all other users. Discuss your bicycle advocacy and safety concerns here.

Dog Bite First Aid for Remote Rides

Old 09-29-19, 10:58 AM
  #1  
zpl
Bike Fun Fanatic
Thread Starter
 
zpl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 650

Bikes: 2020 Trek Checkpoint ALR5, 2012 Surly Disc Trucker

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 7 Posts
Dog Bite First Aid for Remote Rides

I had my first dog bite on a gravel ride last week, and of course it happened halfway through a 50+ mile ride and I had no cell service where it happened. I rode a mile or so (thankfully downhill) to get to an intersection where I was able to call for an ambulance and get to the hospital for treatment.

It's really got me thinking about what I should be doing if I was deeper into a remote solo ride and something like this (or worse) happened. My bite was pretty straightforward as dog bites go, two puncture wounds in my calf, which were somewhat deep. It bled a lot for a few minutes (soaked my sock) but stopped on its own.

Let's assume that rabies isn't an issue and my tetanus vaccination is up to date. How much danger would I be in to keep riding with a dog bite wound? If I had some alcohol wipes and a roll of gauze with me, would that be sufficient to patch things up for a few hours until I got back to a populated area? Or am I really taking my life into my hands by not seeking medical attention as soon as humanly possible?

I'm just looking for a better idea of what I can plan for in terms of a decent trail first aid kit and knowledge of the medical risks and things to watch out for in such conditions.

And yes, I'll be carrying some pepper spray with me from now on, only to use as a last resort.
zpl is offline  
Old 09-29-19, 12:27 PM
  #2  
SactoDoug
eMail Sold to Spammers
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 522
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 13 Posts
Once I was safely away from the dog, I would take a picture of where I was in case I needed to come back and find the dog owner's address. With regards to the wound, I would wash it out with my water bottle, slather some Vaseline on it and a band-aid or two. I keep a few band-aids and a small bit of Vaseline (which I use as chamois cream) in my seat post bag. If it is hurting really bad, I also have a few Excedrin pills too.

Otherwise, there is not a whole lot more that I could do about the wound if I were out in the sticks.
SactoDoug is offline  
Old 09-29-19, 12:38 PM
  #3  
Digger Goreman
Quidam Bike Super Hero
 
Digger Goreman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Stone Mountain, GA (Metro Atlanta, East)
Posts: 1,150

Bikes: 1995 Trek 800 Sport, aka, "CamelTrek"

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 331 Post(s)
Liked 413 Times in 280 Posts
A couple decades ago, I was working for humane society and got bit hard in the bicep. Short story, spent almost five hours between bite and ER treatment. They just washed out the wound and bound it....

I carry packets of normal saline powder (3 parts baking soda, one part salt) and would use it as a wound wash. Slap a gauze pad on it, secure with guaze wrap, and ride to help. Beware of possible shock (we all act differently to wounding).

The normal saline also makes a good bug bite poltice....
Digger Goreman is offline  
Old 09-29-19, 02:28 PM
  #4  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 9,620

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400, 2013 Novara Randonee, 1990 Trek 970

Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2369 Post(s)
Liked 2,635 Times in 1,610 Posts
Never assume. You need to find the dog.

https://www.oregonlive.com/pets/2014...at_happen.html

https://www.animallaw.info/statute/o...-laws#s433_345
dedhed is offline  
Likes For dedhed:
Old 09-29-19, 02:42 PM
  #5  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 27,273
Mentioned: 216 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16978 Post(s)
Liked 3,845 Times in 2,849 Posts
I've never been bit by a dog, and generally don't tolerate them getting close. Nor have I been bit by a wild animal.

So, the first would be prevention.

I probably should carry sterile gauze, but don't. I believe that I could use my own clothing for dressings in many situations. Stop the immediate danger, then deal with infection later. And, if there is a serious situation, most drivers will stop, as well as aid from neighbors, or others you might encounter.

I saw the mention of "Combat Gauze" recently. That sounds like pretty wild stuff!!!

I'm not sure how far one could ride. If you rode a few miles, you could probably ride all the way home. But, it does depend on the extent of the injury. I know there is a "cat scratch disease", but fewer canine specific diseases that affect humans, I think. Nonetheless, deep penetrating wounds can bring bacteria into places you don't want it.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 09-30-19, 05:03 AM
  #6  
bakerjw
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: NE Tennessee
Posts: 917

Bikes: Giant TCR/Surly Karate Monkey/Foundry FireTower/Curtlo Tandem

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 169 Post(s)
Liked 83 Times in 61 Posts
As mentioned, take pictures of the location and the animal if possible.

You said that you called an ambulance. Did the police get notified as well. In most jurisdictions, if a dog bite is reported, animal control or the police get involved. If the dog is not identified or found, you will be treated for rabies and it is not pleasant or inexpensive. We had a local cyclist get bit by a problem dog and he had to do the whole routine.

A couple of years ago a Tour Divide rider was bitten by a dog along the WigWam River in B.C. That area is one of the most remote areas on the entire route. He treated it as well as possible and kept riding. A day or so later he ended up in the hospital for several days being treated for the resulting infection.
bakerjw is offline  
Old 09-30-19, 05:09 AM
  #7  
Newspaper_Nick
Senior Member
 
Newspaper_Nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 153
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 131 Post(s)
Liked 78 Times in 48 Posts
In any case, i'd suggest you to see a doctor because you might need antibiotics. If we are talking about a stray dog, it might eat rotten food to survive and its saliva can house very nasty bacteria. A house dog's saliva would rather be cleaner i assume.
Newspaper_Nick is offline  
Old 09-30-19, 10:49 AM
  #8  
mr_bill
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 4,501
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2090 Post(s)
Liked 638 Times in 429 Posts
Everyone will choose different kits, but basics include:

* Sterile Gloves (also handy for bike repairs)
* Pain reliever of your choice
* Sterile Bandaids
* Sterile Gauze Dressing Pads
* Sterile Gauze Roll
* Self-adhesive bandage wrap
* Antibiotic Ointment
* Scissors
* Waterproof bag to store all the above

Plus non-sterile tap water from your water bottle. (No "*ade" or Skratch.)

If you insist on bringing sterile saline, consider saline ampoules. (If you don't bring enough sterile saline, first clear the would with the non-sterile water from your water bottle, then finish with the sterile saline.)

Suggest taking a basic first aid course, and installing the Red Cross First Aid App.

Nice thing about the app is the content updates, so the continuing changing advise to clean the wound or not to clean the wound is answered there. Currently the advise for an animal bite is if there is serious bleeding, don't clean, just stop the bleeding, call 911, and let the pros clean. If the bleeding is minor, clean with soap and water, then clean water, then antibiotic, and then dressing. See your doctor.

-mr. bill
mr_bill is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 10:01 AM
  #9  
MoAlpha
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Land of Pleasant Living
Posts: 10,668

Bikes: Shmikes

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8816 Post(s)
Liked 4,752 Times in 2,536 Posts
Originally Posted by mr_bill View Post
Everyone will choose different kits, but basics include:

* Sterile Gloves (also handy for bike repairs)
* Pain reliever of your choice
* Sterile Bandaids
* Sterile Gauze Dressing Pads
* Sterile Gauze Roll
* Self-adhesive bandage wrap
* Antibiotic Ointment
* Scissors
* Waterproof bag to store all the above

Plus non-sterile tap water from your water bottle. (No "*ade" or Skratch.)

If you insist on bringing sterile saline, consider saline ampoules. (If you don't bring enough sterile saline, first clear the would with the non-sterile water from your water bottle, then finish with the sterile saline.)

Suggest taking a basic first aid course, and installing the Red Cross First Aid App.

Nice thing about the app is the content updates, so the continuing changing advise to clean the wound or not to clean the wound is answered there. Currently the advise for an animal bite is if there is serious bleeding, don't clean, just stop the bleeding, call 911, and let the pros clean. If the bleeding is minor, clean with soap and water, then clean water, then antibiotic, and then dressing. See your doctor.

-mr. bill
Good kit contents, but an insane amount to carry on a bike ride anywhere near civilization, in my opinion. Advice is also good.

Dogs have dirty mouths and carry some particularly unpleasant Pasteurella species, which often infect bites. The emphasis for any wound that isn't bleeding audibly is to flush it with waterlots of water, and with as rapid a flow as possible. A water bottle makes a great irrigation tool. Soap is not really something you want in a wound, since it's really hard on tissue. I would stop to flush the wound as soon as my surroundings were safe and then head for definitive care.
MoAlpha is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 10:18 AM
  #10  
Arthur Peabody
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 528
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 207 Post(s)
Liked 80 Times in 51 Posts
Washing it out then stopping the bleeding are the only important things to do. I'd carry a small bar of soap (might spill a liquid), find water wash it repeatedly, counting on the water to do most of the work. Then I'd wind as many layers of adhesive tape around it as it took to stanch the bleeding. Nothing you carry will sterilize the wound effectively. Maybe you'll be unhappy for a few seconds when you rip the tape off, but it's better than bleeding all over everything.
Arthur Peabody is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 10:39 AM
  #11  
KraneXL
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,623

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3405 Post(s)
Liked 240 Times in 185 Posts
Originally Posted by zpl View Post
I had my first dog bite on a gravel ride last week, and of course it happened halfway through a 50+ mile ride and I had no cell service where it happened. I rode a mile or so (thankfully downhill) to get to an intersection where I was able to call for an ambulance and get to the hospital for treatment.

It's really got me thinking about what I should be doing if I was deeper into a remote solo ride and something like this (or worse) happened. My bite was pretty straightforward as dog bites go, two puncture wounds in my calf, which were somewhat deep. It bled a lot for a few minutes (soaked my sock) but stopped on its own.

Let's assume that rabies isn't an issue and my tetanus vaccination is up to date. How much danger would I be in to keep riding with a dog bite wound? If I had some alcohol wipes and a roll of gauze with me, would that be sufficient to patch things up for a few hours until I got back to a populated area? Or am I really taking my life into my hands by not seeking medical attention as soon as humanly possible?

I'm just looking for a better idea of what I can plan for in terms of a decent trail first aid kit and knowledge of the medical risks and things to watch out for in such conditions.

And yes, I'll be carrying some pepper spray with me from now on, only to use as a last resort.
One word: infection. It may not be a 911 emergency, but its not something I'd ignore either. Puncture wounds can be serious stuff and you don't know what the dog has been in before he bit you.

I know someone that ignored a tiny little spider bit and by the time he realized something was wrong, the tissue was dead and he ended up having his leg amputated from the knee down. Had he acted immediately, he would still have his leg.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 11:06 AM
  #12  
mr_bill
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 4,501
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2090 Post(s)
Liked 638 Times in 429 Posts
Originally Posted by MoAlpha View Post
Good kit contents, but an insane amount to carry on a bike ride anywhere near civilization, in my opinion. Advice is also good.
I carry a LOT less in my kit near civilization.

-mr. bill
mr_bill is offline  
Likes For mr_bill:
Old 10-01-19, 11:14 AM
  #13  
MoAlpha
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Land of Pleasant Living
Posts: 10,668

Bikes: Shmikes

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8816 Post(s)
Liked 4,752 Times in 2,536 Posts
Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
One word: infection. It may not be a 911 emergency, but its not something I'd ignore either. Puncture wounds can be serious stuff and you don't know what the dog has been in before he bit you.

I know someone that ignored a tiny little spider bit and by the time he realized something was wrong, the tissue was dead and he ended up having his leg amputated from the knee down. Had he acted immediately, he would still have his leg.
That doesn't sound like infection, but, rather, the tissue-killing effect of (probably brown recluse) spider venom. Very, very, serious business. Fortunately, I don't think they chase cyclists.
MoAlpha is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 11:31 AM
  #14  
KraneXL
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,623

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3405 Post(s)
Liked 240 Times in 185 Posts
Originally Posted by MoAlpha View Post
That doesn't sound like infection, but, rather, the tissue-killing effect of (probably brown recluse) spider venom. Very, very, serious business. Fortunately, I don't think they chase cyclists.
You are correct. But my point was the importance of not ignoring puncture wounds.
KraneXL is offline  
Likes For KraneXL:
Old 10-01-19, 01:43 PM
  #15  
bbbean 
Senior Member
 
bbbean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Missouri
Posts: 2,503

Bikes: Giant Propel, Cannondale SuperX, Univega Alpina Ultima

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 568 Post(s)
Liked 314 Times in 180 Posts
If the dog bite is severe enough to require immediate medical care, don't worry about a first aid kit - get to the nearest cell signal or land line and call 911. If it's a relatively minor bite (i.e., everything still works and the bleeding is controllable), finish your ride, clean the wound well when you get home, and decide whether or not you need stitches.

From my own experience - ER cleaning, bandaging, and tetanus shot = $1300 out of pocket. Going home to shower, seeing minor medical the next day, and keeping bandaged for a couple of weeks = $99 (+$25 for a tetanus at the county health department if needed).

I rode home from both of my dog bites- 60 miles in one case and 10 miles in the other. Still made good time, was able to take advantage of the adrenaline and endorphins for extra speed.

One caveat - I was advised that seeking medical care sooner rather than later will assist in reducing scarring. If your plan B involves leg modeling, you might take that into account.
__________________

Formerly fastest rider in the grupetto, currently slowest guy in the peloton

bbbean is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 01:45 PM
  #16  
bbbean 
Senior Member
 
bbbean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Missouri
Posts: 2,503

Bikes: Giant Propel, Cannondale SuperX, Univega Alpina Ultima

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 568 Post(s)
Liked 314 Times in 180 Posts
Originally Posted by MoAlpha View Post
That doesn't sound like infection, but, rather, the tissue-killing effect of (probably brown recluse) spider venom. Very, very, serious business. Fortunately, I don't think they chase cyclists.
They actually do, but they aren't aero at all, so it's easy to outrun them.
__________________

Formerly fastest rider in the grupetto, currently slowest guy in the peloton

bbbean is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 08:18 PM
  #17  
Hondo Gravel
Life Feeds On Life
 
Hondo Gravel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Hondo,Texas
Posts: 2,122

Bikes: Too many Motobecanes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3507 Post(s)
Liked 3,717 Times in 2,455 Posts
Stupid dog bite me in the calf but was about 2 miles from home. The owner wouldn’t owe up to what his dog did. Had to go the emergency room and report it to animal control all by law. The dog was quarantined for 10 days in dog jail. Nurse washed the two puncture wounds then a round of antibiotics. Now after hearing about this incident I may start riding with basic first aid, especially in remote areas. 600 dollars for that! But luckily my insurance covered it and I got the money back. The bad dog owner got off with about 80 bucks.
Hondo Gravel is offline  
Old 10-01-19, 09:41 PM
  #18  
KraneXL
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: La-la Land, CA
Posts: 3,623

Bikes: Cannondale Quick SL1 Bike - 2014

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3405 Post(s)
Liked 240 Times in 185 Posts
Originally Posted by bbbean View Post
If the dog bite is severe enough to require immediate medical care, don't worry about a first aid kit - get to the nearest cell signal or land line and call 911. If it's a relatively minor bite (i.e., everything still works and the bleeding is controllable), finish your ride, clean the wound well when you get home, and decide whether or not you need stitches.

From my own experience - ER cleaning, bandaging, and tetanus shot = $1300 out of pocket. Going home to shower, seeing minor medical the next day, and keeping bandaged for a couple of weeks = $99 (+$25 for a tetanus at the county health department if needed).

I rode home from both of my dog bites- 60 miles in one case and 10 miles in the other. Still made good time, was able to take advantage of the adrenaline and endorphins for extra speed.

One caveat - I was advised that seeking medical care sooner rather than later will assist in reducing scarring. If your plan B involves leg modeling, you might take that into account.
Exhibit A. The is exactly the philosophy I was referring to. Because you never know what microbes are lurking inside the wound, you're taking a chance by not tending to it more thoroughly.

In my example, because the spider bite was tiny the gentlemen I mentioned considered it insignificant. Not recognizing the potency and after effects of the venom.
KraneXL is offline  
Old 10-02-19, 10:21 AM
  #19  
bbbean 
Senior Member
 
bbbean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Missouri
Posts: 2,503

Bikes: Giant Propel, Cannondale SuperX, Univega Alpina Ultima

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 568 Post(s)
Liked 314 Times in 180 Posts
Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
Exhibit A. The is exactly the philosophy I was referring to. Because you never know what microbes are lurking inside the wound, you're taking a chance by not tending to it more thoroughly.

In my example, because the spider bite was tiny the gentlemen I mentioned considered it insignificant. Not recognizing the potency and after effects of the venom.
Noting that dogs are rarely as venomous as spiders, and the fact that I fully endorse cleaning the wound in a reasonable length of time, I'm not sure how much more I need to "tend to" a wound.

FWIW. I also rarely know what chemicals might be on the road, and yet most road rash can be cleaned and treated at home, as can a great many wounds. I am making the assumption that readers are adults and would recognize the signs of a serious or fast spreading infection, uncontrolled bleeding, etc. Maybe that's a mistake, but we do have to assume some competency on the part of the reader. Since I've had EMS training and experience, I may be giving too much credit, but what I've seen from other riders doesn't make me think so.

At any rate, when in doubt, see a pro. In the meantime, think through the likely medical problems you might encounter and have a plan.

When in doubt, see a pro.
__________________

Formerly fastest rider in the grupetto, currently slowest guy in the peloton

bbbean is offline  
Old 10-04-19, 11:01 AM
  #20  
zpl
Bike Fun Fanatic
Thread Starter
 
zpl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 650

Bikes: 2020 Trek Checkpoint ALR5, 2012 Surly Disc Trucker

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 7 Posts
Thanks everyone for the replies, I feel that this thread is pretty unique amongst the other dog bite threads on this forum and will be a good resource for future folks searching for this information.

FWIW I finished the week-long round of antibiotics I was prescribed and the wound is healing quite well. This was a learning experience and I've been fortunate to have an up to date tetanus vaccine and good health insurance. I'll be better prepared and informed for next time.
zpl is offline  
Old 10-04-19, 11:46 AM
  #21  
86az135i
Banned.
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 154

Bikes: 1996 Cannondale R900, 2016 Trek Boone, 2005 Giant Yukon

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 584 Post(s)
Liked 66 Times in 54 Posts
Just an FYI, you should report it and the dog observed. While most rabies are transmitted by bats in the US and rabies is pretty rare in dogs due to vaccinations. If the dog was rabid and rabies transmitted to you. Once you become symptomatic the probability of death is almost certain.
86az135i is offline  
Old 10-04-19, 11:53 AM
  #22  
Korina
Happy banana slug
 
Korina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Arcata, California, U.S., North America, Earth, Saggitarius Arm, Milky Way
Posts: 3,180

Bikes: 1984 Araya MB 261, 1992 Specialized Rockhopper Sport, 1993 Hard Rock Ultra, 1994 Trek Multitrack 750, 1995 Trek Singletrack 930

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1252 Post(s)
Liked 1,075 Times in 664 Posts
Didn't this forum used to have a sticky thread about first aid kits? I could have sworn...
Korina is offline  
Old 10-04-19, 12:15 PM
  #23  
Arthur Peabody
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 528
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 207 Post(s)
Liked 80 Times in 51 Posts
I haven't sought medical attention for a dog bite since I was 10; my parents made the decision then. That said, 'Case 10-2014 - A 45-Year-Old Man with a Rash' from NEJM 5 years ago:
'Three days before presentation, the patient was bitten on his hands and forearms while bathing his dog; later that day, his wife washed the wounds with hydrogen peroxide. Levofloxacin, piperacillin, and tazobactam were administered at the other hospital.'
'Approximately 2 weeks after the initial presentation, the patient showed no sign of improvement and the family decided to pursue comfort measures only. The continuous venovenous hemofiltration was stopped, and the patient was extubated. He died approximately 1 hour later, with his family at the bedside.
https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMcpc1304162
Arthur Peabody is offline  
Old 10-04-19, 04:58 PM
  #24  
Mad Honk 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Bloomington, IN
Posts: 2,168

Bikes: Paramount, Faggin, Ochsner, Ciocc, Ugly Bill

Mentioned: 81 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 910 Post(s)
Liked 1,039 Times in 686 Posts
About twenty years ago I had a dog chase me on my rides. The first time I had to stop and put the bike between he and I. The second time I had a couple of 3/4 inch pebbles in my jersey, nailed him with one right between the eyes and it knocked him off his feet and tore his butt hole up on the pavement. He never approached me after that experience. Sometimes a bit of preventing the situation helps. Smiles, MH
Mad Honk is online now  
Old 10-04-19, 09:00 PM
  #25  
Myosmith
Lover of Old Chrome Moly
 
Myosmith's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: NW Minnesota
Posts: 2,949
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 143 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 22 Times in 17 Posts
All animal bites should be treated promptly, but bites like the one you describe are usually not immediately life threatening. Here's my 2-cents worth of free advice:
  1. Once you are safely away from the animal, stop riding until you get the bleeding under control. Continued riding at this point will hinder clotting.
  2. Find a place where you can sit or lie down and elevate your injured leg.
  3. If bleeding is minor, you can take the time to rinse the wound with clean water if you have it, but if bleeding is serious, stopping the bleed is your priority.
  4. Apply direct pressure to the wound with your hand. Use gauze pads from a first aid kit if you have them. You can also use any handy cloth as a dressing. Don't play peek-a-boo to see if it's still bleeding. Leave the dressing in place.
  5. Call for help if you can.
  6. After several minutes of continued pressure, apply a bandage of some kind to hold the dressing in place, this can be tape, a gauze wrap, bandana, etc.
  7. If you are in a remote area with no phone service, you have to decide whether to wait where you are (you did tell someone where you were going and when you should be expected back, right?) of if your only option is to walk or ride to somewhere where you can get help.
  8. Use the injured limb as little as possible and watch for renewed bleeding. If bleeding badly, you may have to stop to get it under control again.
  9. Do not take aspirin or ibuprofen as they can interfere with blood clotting.
Every situation is different and keeping a cool head and using your critical thinking skills will go a long way to improving your outcome. If you don't have any first aid training, get some, either through a recognized training organization or books/online. The basics aren't complicated and can be learned in a few hours. Here are some items you may want to consider for a first aid kit if you are going to ride alone in remote areas:
  • Gauze 4x4s (you can get these in a 10 pack)
  • 2" or 3" wide gauze roll bandage
  • A roll of 2" Coban (self adhesive roller bandage, may come by other brand names)
  • 2-3 medium size Tegaderm clear dressings (again may come by other brand names)
  • A roll of cloth athletic tape (stays on better in wet or sweaty conditions than most first aid tapes)
  • A few large fabric adhesive bandages (Band-Aids)
Of course this list isn't all inclusive and you have to decide just how remote your ride is going to be. Are you going to be minutes, hours or days away from help? A tourniquet can be purchased ready made, or can be improvised from your roll of gauze and a tire lever or similar rigid stick, for serious bleeding that can't be controlled with elevation and direct pressure. Make sure to get some training to know when and how to apply a tourniquet properly. They aren't often needed but can be life saving in a serious injury.

Seek medical attention for any animal bite that penetrates the skin. Puncture wounds or more than very minor lacerations should also be evaluated by a medical provider. Please report all animal bites or vicious animals to the proper authorities.
Myosmith is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.