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"Slow street" proposals as a result of COVID

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"Slow street" proposals as a result of COVID

Old 05-19-20, 07:44 AM
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"Slow street" proposals as a result of COVID

On the west coast I am seeing a few cities proposing closing streets, or dramatically slowing the speeds on streets (with barriers) to encourage walking and cycling. Another stated benefit is along streets with restaurants, to permit restaurants to place tables outside, further apart.

Overall, this means slowing and reducing motor traffic in certain areas... and as I mentioned, encouraging cycling.

Are you seeing any such "slow street proposals" in areas other than the west coast? Seattle Forrest mentioned seeing this in Seattle, I am seeing such proposals in San Diego. I wonder if there is any way to incorporate these proposals in a more permanent way. In San Diego, "seeing this in European cities" was mentioned as an example of what is desirable.

Of course, this also means that cyclists cannot ride through such areas at top racing speed... which no doubt, some will find discouraging. Speed limits being discussed for the "slow streets" are at 15MPH.
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Old 05-19-20, 07:49 AM
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The problem is people have huge commutes to places like the bay area since no one who is lower middle class can afford to live there, the powers that be are just deluded about reality. In other cities it's a little different but these are mainly the ones pushing this kind of thing.
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Old 05-19-20, 09:43 AM
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I'd like to see that around here. The communities in the North Salt Lake (around Hill AFB) are all really quite good when it comes to infrastructure. Lots of wide (full 8-12 ft) bike lanes, MUPs, sharrows with lots of signs saying bikes may use full lane. And while the drivers are better than a lot of places I've lived, there are still a lot of people with terrible attitudes towards bikes.

Making them slow a little and putting other restrictions in might help with the safety. It probably won't help with their attitudes, though.

I can only think of a few places where they might implement a slow streets program here though, without major infrastructure work.
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Old 05-19-20, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Oneder View Post
The problem is people have huge commutes to places like the bay area since no one who is lower middle class can afford to live there, the powers that be are just deluded about reality. In other cities it's a little different but these are mainly the ones pushing this kind of thing.
Do you commute at speeds vastly over 15mph? I always found my commute speed to be about 17mph average.

And bear in mind, these "slow sreets" are for areas of high density (which I failed to mention) and thus may not effect longer distance commuters. Of course, it may, if the commute is right across the downtown area.
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Old 05-19-20, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by genec View Post
Do you commute at speeds vastly over 15mph? I always found my commute speed to be about 17mph average.

And bear in mind, these "slow sreets" are for areas of high density (which I failed to mention) and thus may not effect longer distance commuters. Of course, it may, if the commute is right across the downtown area.
And your 15 mph will quickly turn to 10 mph. Plus you will have runners, walkers and dogs roaming, paying little attention to who they are stepping out in front of without looking.
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Old 05-20-20, 11:18 AM
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There is a popular area in my city called Bayshore. It is a balustrade sidewalk bordering the bay that goes on for about 5 miles and links to a new downtown river walk. Essentially it is a MUP and used daily by cyclist, runners and walkers. There is also a 4 lane road that runs along side it. Not sure if it has anything to do with the virus, but recently, there have been some pretty horrible accidents and deaths caused by motor vehicles. I saw on the news they are thinking of closing the water side of the road way and making it a non vehicle path. That would be really great if they did.
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Old 05-20-20, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by genec View Post
Do you commute at speeds vastly over 15mph? I always found my commute speed to be about 17mph average.

And bear in mind, these "slow sreets" are for areas of high density (which I failed to mention) and thus may not effect longer distance commuters. Of course, it may, if the commute is right across the downtown area.
The problem is who's going to be on it in the first place? It just doesn't make much sense because you can't ride a bike 70 miles a day for your commute. It makes more sense in NYC because there are cheap apartments in the vicinity but the planners in bay area and LA have created a traffic nightmare situation and all their 'solutions' keep making things even worse.
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Old 05-22-20, 11:49 AM
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NACTO has come out with a manual for redesigning streets for COVID-19 safety: https://usa.streetsblog.org/2020/05/...ting-covid-19/

It looks pretty good to me.
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Old 05-24-20, 06:50 AM
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I notice seen Covid-19 the car drivers are driving crazy and really dangerous.
I guess most of the people are anxious and worried and it's been reflected in the driving.
Find it dangerous to ride on roads now
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Old 05-24-20, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by genec View Post
On the west coast I am seeing a few cities proposing closing streets, or dramatically slowing the speeds on streets (with barriers) to encourage walking and cycling. Another stated benefit is along streets with restaurants, to permit restaurants to place tables outside, further apart.

Overall, this means slowing and reducing motor traffic in certain areas... and as I mentioned, encouraging cycling.

Are you seeing any such "slow street proposals" in areas other than the west coast? Seattle Forrest mentioned seeing this in Seattle, I am seeing such proposals in San Diego. I wonder if there is any way to incorporate these proposals in a more permanent way. In San Diego, "seeing this in European cities" was mentioned as an example of what is desirable.

Of course, this also means that cyclists cannot ride through such areas at top racing speed... which no doubt, some will find discouraging. Speed limits being discussed for the "slow streets" are at 15MPH.
there’s a petition here to close off two of the four lanes of Franklin Street running through Chapel Hill NC, to allow restaurants to use the entire sidewalk for tables and giving over the outer traffic lanes for pedestrian traffic - no idea if bikes will also use that space. Restaurants are all for it, although other businesses may not be as welcoming, as it would likely do away with current street parking. No one drives fast though town anyway (except maybe in the middle of the night) so I dont see a speed limit making a big difference
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Old 05-24-20, 08:12 AM
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Originally Posted by ilcaccillo View Post
I notice seen Covid-19 the car drivers are driving crazy and really dangerous.
I guess most of the people are anxious and worried and it's been reflected in the driving.
Find it dangerous to ride on roads now
I have indeed seen quite a bit of speeding, and poor attention to stop signs... and drivers that are zooming about in sports cars, because they can, and the roads are so clear. Indeed, a bad combination. Especially with so many folks out walking... and cycling. Reducing their driving area may help some of that... if roadways are narrowed with barriers to allow increased "sidewalk" or bike area. I think the key is the barriers. Right now all I see are cones and sawhorses... mostly visual. But I have read in local papers about adding barriers and making it more substantial.

There is the problem of local parking though, and the potential of fewer visitors to local businesses... but I see more pedestrians visiting businesses... so I wonder if there is any offset. Typical cars carry one or two people (I know, CAN carry more, but often do not) so a lot of space is given to empty cars that could serve pedestrians. Cities waste quite a bit of space "storing cars." Parking structures are vastly more efficient, and streets themselves could be more open to people.
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