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How riding a bike can help reduce arthritis and knee pain

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How riding a bike can help reduce arthritis and knee pain

Old 06-17-24, 09:38 AM
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How riding a bike can help reduce arthritis and knee pain

How riding a bike can help reduce arthritis and knee pain.pdf
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Old 06-17-24, 09:43 AM
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I think that part of this got knee-capped during PDF creation.
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Old 06-17-24, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Polaris OBark
I think that part of this got knee-capped during PDF creation.
I'll try again
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Old 06-17-24, 09:56 AM
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Osteoarthritis has been a real bugger for me. Can't walk, hike, climb, canoe, or work under the car like I used to. Or for that matter do any kind of high impact activity. Rats! Even the great grankids Nerf Volleyball hurts. Its pitiful.

But I can still ride. Yep...

My little 5 to 10 mile Up and Down rides have become even more enjoyable as my overall abilities decline...

Then again I often see guys older than me on their cross country tours camping out in the local state park as they ride through. BRAVO to them!
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Old 06-17-24, 01:30 PM
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Another useful therapeutic effect of cycling is on the muscles and vertebrae of the middle and upper back. If you ride with your arms full extended on your handlebars (Which I do since I have brifters....I'm almost always extended) it really helps ease some pain and numbness problems you have.

My specialist suggested that you stand slightly more than arms length from a wall and try and "reach out and touch the wall" with your arms. I find riding like I do, accomplishes the same goal. More scenic too!
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Old 06-17-24, 05:03 PM
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I ride a bike for both transportation and recreation.

While there are ways to ride a bike for physical therapy, the fact is that for true and total musculoskeletal health we all need more than just a bike. As you ride a bike certain areas will strengthen, but at the same time other areas that are not used as much will continue to weaken and this creates an unbalance in muscular strength (e.g. imbalance between the quads and the hamstrings) and this effects total strength and mobility, not to mention pain.

A couple videos from two guys I follow (their YT channel) for ideas to keep a healthy body, both strong and flexible. And if you have knee problems the Kneesovertoesguy is really onto something and his routines are truly transformative.

I'll hit the big 6-0 this year and I still run and I do still sprint, which is very taxing on the body. And it's only because of other exercises I do, found on both of the below YT channels.




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Old 06-18-24, 08:10 AM
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So what's the take away here... Move it or lose it?

It being the ability to move it.
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Old 06-18-24, 08:19 AM
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Here we go again.
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Old 06-19-24, 08:31 AM
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At the moment, I limp due to arthritis, but no problem riding a bike. Weird.
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Old 06-21-24, 06:07 AM
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I am currently 67 years old, but have had osteoarthritis in my knees for decades. I was told at age 45 that I had the knees of a 75-year-old. The last time I had my knees X-rayed, the technician put my images on the screen and she gasped and said "Holy $#it, look at those knees!"

However, I do not suffer from arthritic pain. I have been cycling my whole life, and my current orthopedic doctor tells me to just keep riding as much as possible. Sure, if I stand for a couple of hours I will get sore knees, but I am generally pain free. I attribute this primarily to cycling. (I also take turmeric supplements which helps).
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Old 06-21-24, 09:21 AM
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This cyclist on the GCN YT channel is finally getting the clue that being a rail-thin cyclist is not a way to age in a healthy manner. Cycling is a great cardio activity, but for overall healthy body we need resistance activities, which includes strength and power.


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Old 06-21-24, 09:35 AM
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Another good point of view from a professional athlete.

This guy (Nick Symmonds) a retired Olympic athlete that specialized in the 800m on the track, shows just why participating in just one sport is actually unhealthy (in the long run).



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Old 06-24-24, 12:16 PM
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Good points. Since you seem to pretty well versed on these matters...let me ask. At the age of 70 I'm having problems with what doctors refer to as your "basement" (taint no other way to describe it), and Im wondering if my painful bottom might be a consequence of riding and touring for over 250K since 1975. Since most doctors are not bike riders they aren't able to tell me if this might be a cycling side effect. Or maybe it's just another pain in the @ss for the seventy year old fella!
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Old 06-25-24, 03:03 PM
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I've had chondo-- chrondo-- no cartilage between my kneecap and joint for many years; when I bend a knee, you can hear the grinding. I find it interesting that I can climb up steps just fine, for a while at least, but down steps is no bueno. I used to be able to raise my butt a couple inches off the saddle over rough pavement, but these days sitting back down is a knife stab to the joints. Squats of any kind are out of the question. I'm lucky that riding and walking don't seem to be causing problems so far.
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Old 06-26-24, 08:24 PM
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I would think riding uphill (or riding too hard on high gear even on flat surface) is not good for the knee if the knee already has problem?
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Old 06-27-24, 10:12 AM
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Same here at times

Originally Posted by ScottCommutes
At the moment, I limp due to arthritis, but no problem riding a bike. Weird.
when I was a graduate student at Oregon State, I somehow twisted my leg while I was running. I still donít know exactly what I did, and it took me almost 2 months of steroids to finally get back to the point where I could start walking again let alone run. but I was able to ride my bike on long distance tours. I rode all the way down to crater Lake, and when I get off my bicycle, I had to limp into the guesthouse!

most serious cyclists have always told me that. Make sure you have a high cadence. Thatís good for your knees and your lower back. Correct?
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Old 06-27-24, 12:13 PM
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Low impact exersize is the best long term. I cycle most weekends, and it's great on the joints. With running for example, knees take a hammering.
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