Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Advocacy & Safety
Reload this Page >

Hunters Gunning for Mountain Bikers in Sisters Oregon

Notices
Advocacy & Safety Cyclists should expect and demand safe accommodation on every public road, just as do all other users. Discuss your bicycle advocacy and safety concerns here.

Hunters Gunning for Mountain Bikers in Sisters Oregon

Old 10-04-10, 12:38 PM
  #1  
randya
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
randya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: in bed with your mom
Posts: 13,696

Bikes: who cares?

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hunters Gunning for Mountain Bikers in Sisters Oregon

9/28/2010 1:29:00 PM
Cyclists in the woods in hunting season
http://www.nuggetnews.com/main.asp?S...rticleID=17737


Saturday, October 2, marks the opening of the general rifle hunting season in the Sisters Country. It is also the scheduled date of the Sisters Mountain Bike Festival.

Hunters have expressed concern that mountain bike riders will be riding in some of the areas frequented by hunters on opening day, creating the potential for tragic mishaps.

Cyclists may want to wear blaze orange while in the woods, while hunters should exercise extreme caution in the area of Peterson Ridge and in other areas frequented by cyclists.
randya is offline  
Old 10-04-10, 12:55 PM
  #2  
slowandsteady
Faster but still slow
 
slowandsteady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Jersey
Posts: 5,979

Bikes: Trek 830 circa 1993 and a Fuji WSD Finest 1.0 2006

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Dumb to have a mountain bike ride on opening day. I ride my horse on Sundays in the fall for that exact reason.
slowandsteady is offline  
Old 10-04-10, 01:29 PM
  #3  
crhilton
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 4,568

Bikes: '07 Trek 1500, '08 Surly Cross Check, '09 Masi Speciale Sprint custom build

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
This seems like a death waiting to happen, even with orange.

I have great respect for my friends and family who hunt. They're intelligent and responsible and good shots. I still don't want to be in the wrong 180 degrees of them when they're taking aim. Even if I'm in orange yelling my whereabouts with flashing lights.

They ought to move/reschedule the biking event (I suspect that moving the hunting involves the legislature and changing animal habits).
crhilton is offline  
Old 10-04-10, 02:13 PM
  #4  
ratdog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: New York City
Posts: 875
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Really smart,... what's there to shoot other than mountain bikers when the mountain bikers are going to be scaring everything else away?
ratdog is offline  
Old 10-04-10, 02:52 PM
  #5  
Brian Sharpe
Senior Member
 
Brian Sharpe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: 'burbs of Ottawa ON Canada
Posts: 173

Bikes: Marin Larkspur / Giant Defy Alliance 1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I realize this is a very serious thread but based on its title I can only think that the OP has a brilliant future writing headlines for the National Enquirer.

On a more serious note, I'd say this was a major scheduling SNAFU. As October 2nd has come and gone is it safe to say there were no unfortunate incidents?
Brian Sharpe is offline  
Old 10-04-10, 03:20 PM
  #6  
Keith99
Senior Member
 
Keith99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 5,866
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a second cousin who is an avid hunter. He used to live in Napa county CA. He had baged a buck opening day for about 12 years in a row when he decided to give up hunting locally. Opening day was just too dangerous, all the deer were too cautious after opening day.
Keith99 is offline  
Old 10-06-10, 07:03 PM
  #7  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 5,696

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 909 Post(s)
Liked 253 Times in 193 Posts
What's the bag limit on Mt. bikes? What is considered a "trophy" one? Full suspension 29er with XTR?

A bike "festival" to me would be a non-issue as far as safety when I'm hunting. Lots of bikes, few solo riders. You pretty much know to look out. The time to worry is when you are 1 rider out there and moving silently along. Never wear brown & white in the fall woods.

A good hunter knows their target before they pull the trigger. Misses could be the trouble, a bullet travels a long way.
dedhed is offline  
Old 10-06-10, 07:16 PM
  #8  
RacerOne
Hills hurt.. Couches kill
 
RacerOne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Brazil, IN
Posts: 3,370

Bikes: 1991 Specialized Sirrus Triple, 2010 Trek Madone 6.5 Project One, 2012 Cannondale Caad10, 2013 Trek Crockett

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That is one loaded headline.
RacerOne is offline  
Old 10-06-10, 08:09 PM
  #9  
spock
Peripheral Visionary
 
spock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Jax, FL
Posts: 1,157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Bow and arrow would be a lot safer, but it requires a lot more skill. I don't get it. Some of these hunters have snipers. Might as well go to their local grocery store for their meat.
spock is offline  
Old 10-06-10, 09:12 PM
  #10  
electrik
Single-serving poster
 
electrik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 5,098
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Hah, every year some lady out for a hike gets blasted by a jumpy hunter whose been waiting too long and had a few beers.

Don't matter if you're wearing orange head to toe. These morons shoot each other.
electrik is offline  
Old 10-06-10, 09:16 PM
  #11  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 20,091
Mentioned: 55 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10054 Post(s)
Liked 1,363 Times in 811 Posts
Originally Posted by crhilton View Post
I still don't want to be in the wrong 180 degrees of them when they're taking aim. Even if I'm in orange yelling my whereabouts with flashing lights.
"I thought he was a bird."
--Dick Cheney
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 11:51 AM
  #12  
Robert C
Senior Member
 
Robert C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Kansas
Posts: 2,120

Bikes: This list got too long: several ‘bents, an urban utility e-bike, and a dahon D7 that my daughter has absconded with.

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 315 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Hah, every year some lady out for a hike gets blasted by a jumpy hunter whose been waiting too long and had a few beers.

Don't matter if you're wearing orange head to toe. These morons shoot each other.
This thread started with a inflammatory title and then attracted those who argue from falsehood and ignorance.

Now I am not going to argue against the principle that the goal is zero incidents, just as the goal is zero traffic accidents. However, the numbers show that hunting is very safe.

These first quotes comes from an article that is highly critical of hunting; but, even it fails to support the stereotype that is being supported here.
In 2003, the year the previous records were set, there were 57 hunting-related shooting incidents, including four fatalities, and the incident rate was 5.63 per 100,000.
In 2004, the incident statistics by species hunted were deer, 23 (including four fatalities); wild turkey, 14; small game, 13; waterfowl, 4; and other, 2.
People shot in the line-of-fire comprised 18 of the hunting-related shooting incidents, including one fatality.
The second most common cause for shooting incidents was in mistaken for game, which accounted for 16 incidents, including one fatality.
Unintentional discharge accounted for 8 incidents, including one fatality, followed by: sporting arm in a dangerous position, 6, including one fatality; slipped and/or fell, 4; ricochet, 3; and a defective sporting arm, 1.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pitt.../s_334577.html
Now, the second category, mistaken for game, is a very disturbing category, and it is what most here fear and the one person killed was clearly one too many. However, look at the numbers; yes, too many, yes, it needs to be reduced and every year that number does go down (of course, with a number as low as four total fatalities, nearly any tragic incident can cause a huge, statistical, rise). These are single state statistics, it is was just one of the first hits that came up that was well written and supported the premise that 1. Hunting safety has room for improvement and 2. in spite of that, hunting as a reasonably safe activity.

The facts are that, even during hunting season, your bicycle is more dangerous to you than the hunters are.

Hunting myths

Dispelling some myths about hunting

By Tom Dickson, DNR information officer
Note: This article may be reprinted in newspapers, newsletters, and other publications.
If you don't hunt, you might wonder what's so appealing about this activity. Why, for example, would anyone sit for hours in a chilly duck blind? Or trudge mile after mile through soggy cattail sloughs? And what's the thrill in trying to kill an animal, anyway? If hunters want to be outdoors and see animals, can't they just watch wildlife without shooting them?
Hunting, with a half-million Minnesota participants, must certainly stir the curiosity of those who don't take part.
Why someone hunts is a personal matter. Many do it to spend time outdoors with friends or family. Others hunt to continue a tradition passed down from their parents and grandparents. Some go for the satisfaction of providing their own meat or the challenge of outwitting a wild animal. Many hunt simply because they feel an urge to do so. As environmentalist and hunter Aldo Leopold put it, "the instinct that finds delight in the sight and pursuit of game is bred into the very fiber of the race."
It's hard to generalize what hunters are doing when they go afield each fall. But it is possible to explain what hunters are not doing, and to shed light on some aspects of hunting that might puzzle those who don't participate. Hunters aren't killing animals needlessly.
People who say there's no need to kill animals for meat when it can be bought in a grocery store don't understand how food happens: Whether someone eats venison or beef, a big brown-eyed mammal has to die first. The animal doesn't care whether you pay someone else to kill it or you do it yourself.
Of course, vegetarians don't kill animals. Or do they? Most vegetable production is done at the expense of wild creatures, either by converting wildlife habitat to cropland or requiring the application of chemical pesticides and fertilizers. Soybeans and corn, for example, are often grown on wetlands that have been drained and plowed. Without a place to nest, a hen mallard doesn't die, but she doesn't raise any young, either.
1. Hunters aren't being cruel to wild animals.
Most wild animals don't pass away in comfort, sedated by veterinary medication. They usually die a violent, agonizing death. Though a hunter's bullet or arrow can cause a wild animal pain and trauma, such a death is no worse than the other ways wildlife perish. A deer not shot eventually will be killed by a car, predator, exposure, or starvation. An old, weakened pheasant doesn't die in its sleep. It gets caught by a hawk and eaten.
Of course, hunters don't do individual wild animals any favors by killing them, but they also don't do anything unnaturally cruel.
2. Hunters aren't dangerous, inept, or trigger-happy.
Hunting would seem more prone to accidents and fatalities than outdoor activities that don't use firearms. Not so. According to National Safety Council statistics, far more people per 100,000 participants are injured while bicycling or playing baseball than while hunting. And the Council's most recent statistics show that while roughly 100 people die nationwide in hunting accidents each year, more than 1,500 die in swimming-related incidents.
One reason for hunting's safety record: Most states require young hunters to pass a firearms safety course. In Minnesota alone, 4,000 volunteer instructors give firearms safety training to 20,000 young hunters each year.
Just as they handle their gun cautiously, so do most hunters strive to kill game as cleanly as possible. Hunters practice their marksmanship, study wildlife behavior and biology, and take pains to follow a wounded animal to ensure any suffering ends quickly.
As do all activities, hunting has its share of scofflaws. But most hunters obey the law and act ethically. To nab the wrongdoers among them, hunters created Turn In Poachers, a nonprofit organization that offers rewards for information leading to the arrest of fish and game law violators.
3. Hunters aren't harming wildlife populations.
Hunters see to that out of self-interest. That's why they support state and federal conservation agencies limiting seasons to just a few weeks or months a year, limiting the number of animals they kill, and placing restrictions on killing females of some species. These regulations help ensure that wildlife populations stay healthy. They also make the pursuit of game more difficult, requiring hunters to use their wits, patience, and hunting skills.
4. Hunters aren't using non-hunters? tax dollars.
Hunters pay their own way, and then some. Minnesota hunters fund almost all Department of Natural Resources habitat acquisition and wildlife research with their license fees and a federal excise tax on hunting equipment. In addition, their financial support pays to improve populations of non-game wildlife. Wetland destruction has wiped out the habitats of many bird species, causing their numbers to decline. Were it not for wetlands bought and improved with state and federal waterfowl stamp revenue and with the contributions of hunting conservation organizations, hunters and others who like to watch wildlife would today see fewer marsh wrens, pied-billed grebes, Forster's terns, and other wetland birds. These are some things that hunters aren't doing.
What I suspect most are doing--if they hunt for the reasons I do--is fulfilling a need to be part of the natural world that observation alone can't satisfy.
http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/hunting/tips/myths.html


Originally Posted by spock View Post
Bow and arrow would be a lot safer, but it requires a lot more skill. I don't get it. Some of these hunters have snipers. Might as well go to their local grocery store for their meat.
I am not all to sure what you mean by, "Some of these hunters have snipers." Here is the weird thing, bow hunting is a lot more risky. I do not know why. However, I suspect that it may come from the presumption that it is safer; thus, leading to more risky choices. I can think of other potential reasons though. I am both a target shooter and an archer. I see the general public doing stupid things near archers that just would not happen near a rifle range.

By way of example, at a multi-purpose field I used to go to, for practice, cyclists would frequently cut through the archery range to shortcut the connections between two paths. On another incident, in the middle of a shoot, where several of us were at full draw and intent on our target, a guy ran right into the range to catch a thrown football. Of course, there was no accident and all of us were strong enough to hold our shots (and we were all using heavy, hunting bows; so, that was no sure thing). He did have a understanding of how stupid it was, he was just following the ball and not demonstrating a high situational awareness. However, it did have the potential of being a tragic archery accident that was only prevented by the level of training amongst the archers. (he did have a good sense of humor about it, once all was clear he made a quick quip, "wow, talk about running into the jaws of death.") I eventually stopped using that range, it was just too chaotic.

Last edited by Robert C; 10-07-10 at 12:45 PM.
Robert C is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 12:25 PM
  #13  
B. Carfree
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Eugene, Oregon
Posts: 7,048
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 502 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
I did see one "mistaken for game" killing that was almost excusable, at least as far as the trigger-man was concerned. Someone had shot a large animal and only wanted the head for a trophy. He cut off the head and then lifted it up onto his shoulders to carry it to his motor vehicle. Another hunter saw the trophy stomping through the forest and fired at it. Sadly, the original hunter caught the fire in a fatal manner.

Regarding the headline, I see lots of motor vehicles that have apparently bagged their limits of bikes. They have them displayed on racks on the cars/trucks/SUV.
B. Carfree is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 01:49 PM
  #14  
spock
Peripheral Visionary
 
spock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Jax, FL
Posts: 1,157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Robert C View Post
I am not all to sure what you mean by, "Some of these hunters have snipers."
What I mean is that using shotguns and snipers on shotguns is not fair to the other species. Too easy and you can't tell me that an arrow is more dangerous than a bullet. Otherwise us army would be armed with bows and arrows. Why not make it interesting and kill a member of another species in the way that requires a lot more skill and not just point and shoot from 20 miles away. Level the playing field. There is a fine line between the sport and slaughter and many hunters cross that line. They walk free, yet Micheal Vick had to go to jail. Sure dogs are a lot more cool with humans, but deer have consciousness too and I don't blame them for running like hell when they sense humans anywhere near. Extremely smart if you ask me.
spock is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 01:53 PM
  #15  
randya
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
randya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: in bed with your mom
Posts: 13,696

Bikes: who cares?

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think that you are mistaking a 'scope' for a 'sniper'. Also, most big game is not taken with a shotgun.

randya is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 01:55 PM
  #16  
electrik
Single-serving poster
 
electrik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 5,098
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2...76276-sun.html
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/newfoundlan...eview-101.html

Sorry if i don't hold my breath when you tell me it's safe... it's not as safe as not having hunters in there now is it? BTW those stats you post are nonsense, how many people are in the woods walking and being shot at by hunters? You don't know. How can you say it's safe to walk in the forest, how are you quantifying that? If there are 100,000 people in a forest then your stats make sense... maybe there is only 10 people walking in that forest and one gets shot? 1 in 10?? thats not so hot odds.
electrik is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 02:04 PM
  #17  
spock
Peripheral Visionary
 
spock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Jax, FL
Posts: 1,157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by randya View Post
I think that you are mistaking a 'scope' for a 'sniper'. Also, most big game is not taken with a shotgun.

Excuse me--, rifle, shotgun, sniper, scope, it's all the same crap to me.
spock is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 02:07 PM
  #18  
crhilton
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 4,568

Bikes: '07 Trek 1500, '08 Surly Cross Check, '09 Masi Speciale Sprint custom build

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I wonder how much of the safety is driven by hunters naturally tending to go where people don't hike or bike because the game is already scared off by those.
crhilton is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 02:51 PM
  #19  
sudo bike
Bicikli Huszár
 
sudo bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 2,116

Bikes: '95 Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by electrik View Post
Hah, every year some lady out for a hike gets blasted by a jumpy hunter whose been waiting too long and had a few beers.

Don't matter if you're wearing orange head to toe. These morons shoot each other.
And cyclists are just a bunch of jerks who run red lights and ride dangerously. Oh, wait....

Originally Posted by spock
What I mean is that using shotguns and snipers on shotguns is not fair to the other species. Too easy and you can't tell me that an arrow is more dangerous than a bullet.
Not entirely true. While it does take more skill to learn to aim with a bow (less so with a crossbow), a good bow will kill an animal just as easy as a rifle. In some cases, more easily. A broadhead arrow causes a large wound prone to bleeding, as opposed to the "clean" wound of a rifle round (shotgun isn't used for big game - only birds and rabbits and such). The major advantage of a gun is range, which isn't as large in the woods as in a field. So, there is some advantage, but I think maybe it's not as big as you may think. If it's not one of those "hunting camp" things where it's like shooting fish in a barrel, but an actual hunt in the woods, it does take skill. The shot is only one part of the hunt. FWIW, I'm not a hunter, but I've done a fair bit of archery.

Also, special forces still often uses crossbows when silence is necessary . Otherwise, I think the difference between an automatic rifle and a bow, is a bit different than a hunting rifle and a bow.

Last edited by sudo bike; 10-07-10 at 02:55 PM.
sudo bike is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 03:07 PM
  #20  
randya
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
randya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: in bed with your mom
Posts: 13,696

Bikes: who cares?

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by spock View Post
Excuse me--, rifle, shotgun, sniper, scope, it's all the same crap to me.
you don't have to be an afficionado to get the terminology correct, your argument will be more credible if you do

randya is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 03:29 PM
  #21  
electrik
Single-serving poster
 
electrik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 5,098
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by sudo bike View Post
And cyclists are just a bunch of jerks who run red lights and ride dangerously. Oh, wait....

...
Your point?

We have a body count around here of nice ladies out for a fall walk who were shot. They were shot by over-zealous hunters, they end up shooting somebody every year they even shoot their buddies(wandering around in camo no less).
electrik is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 06:51 PM
  #22  
CommuterRun
Conservative Hippie
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Wakulla Co. FL
Posts: 4,271
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well, the organizers of the Sisters Mountain Bike Festival don't seem to be overly endowed with brilliance. Bet'cha they don't make this same mistake again next year.

I would go ahead and hunt if I were planning to do that. The activity in the woods may keep the game moving.

Between bicycling and hunting, bicycling is a much more dangerous activity.

Shotguns for big game - Many big game animals in North America are taken each year with shotguns. Some states are shotgun only and don't allow the use of rifles at all for hunting. Some other states are shotgun only in certain areas, while allowing rifles in other areas. Shotguns can, and have, cleanly taken every species of big game animal on this continent.

Sometimes I use a rifle and at other times a shotgun. It just depends on conditions I expect to encounter, where and how I will be hunting. Either can be equally effective. Although a shotgun with buckshot loads is severely limited in effective range when compared to a rifle, under some conditions that doesn't matter.

Nevermind. I had another comment in mind to something that was posted earlier, but I think I'll just skip it.
CommuterRun is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 09:02 PM
  #23  
Dchiefransom
Senior Member
 
Dchiefransom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Newark, CA. San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 6,247
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
A lot of the hunting accidents today are from falling out of treestands. Wonder why I hunt from the ground.
Dchiefransom is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 09:03 PM
  #24  
NoReg
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 5,115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
"bow hunting is a lot more risky"

Huh, I don't believe that, what is the evidence? There are just so many reasons why this shouldn't be the case. I have bow hunted over 30 years, and while there are lots of variables, I hunt mostly private land since disturbed game is a big problem for bowhunters, so there isn't anyone to shoot on private land. Range is short, I always know my target I can see the area around it. Snap shooting is pointless for the most part. It is a single shot weapon. Most shooting is done from an elevated position so the arrow is stopped immediately as it goes through or by the animal. Etc...

I think people should be careful when talking about hunting as a sport. The main moral justification for hunting is food. In most places you are legally required to process your kill as food. Nobody knows what people do with it when they get it home, but you are required to kill for food where game animals are concerned. So there is nothing wrong with using any means you wish to use to convert the animal to food, it doesn't have to be a sport. If the US version of hunting has one weak point it has to do with elevating long risky shots made by folks with fancy gear. It sells fancy gear. For the most part, game animals in the US are public property, which means unscrupulous hunters aren't charged for wounding or missing game, generally.

There are various reasons why people hunt, just as cycle. Some of them are similar. One phsychologist described four motivations: Harvesters; Doinators; Skill motivated/sports; Comuning with nature types. Most hunters probably have a little of all four but lean in a particular direction. The way these different types present in the field varies. Like the harvester probably doesn't care if he gets to take an easy shot. You might compare these types to Comuters; Gonzo couriers and other pushy types; Racers, trials riders, etc... Oh I don't know... tourers.

Last edited by NoReg; 10-07-10 at 09:12 PM.
NoReg is offline  
Old 10-07-10, 09:56 PM
  #25  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 5,696

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 909 Post(s)
Liked 253 Times in 193 Posts
Hunting is very safe. I've been hurt more times biking then hunting I can tell you that.

Here's an interesting report with all kinds of stats if you're into that sort of thing. 2007 numbers for WI. 27 total incidents, 4 fatalities, 19% self inflicted, most a member of the same hunting party. WI is a state that puts 645,000 armed hunters in the woods for a 9 day gun deer season.

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/land/...accident07.pdf

Just for good measure here is the dollars Sportsmen/women put into the states for 2009 with the 11% Federal Excise tax on guns, ammo, and archery equipment under the Pittman-Robertson act. Often going to buy land and habitat open to all users. Hunters are one of the few people who actually do "pay to play"

http://wsfrprograms.fws.gov/subpages...onment2009.pdf

Last edited by dedhed; 10-07-10 at 10:11 PM.
dedhed is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.