Beach Cruisers Do you love balloon tires and fenders? Do you love riding the simplicity of a single gear and coaster brakes or a single gear cluster? Do you love the classic curves in the tubing of a cruiser that takes you back to the 1950's and 1960's, stylistically? Here's your home! Welcome to the Beach Cruisers and Cruisers forum!

Best Cruiser

Reply

Old 05-05-18, 02:29 PM
  #26  
Bookie512
Jesse James
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Southern Mississippi
Posts: 7

Bikes: Aluminum cruiser, self modified

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
cruiser

I got into cruiser bikes to simplify my life. Look at a bike that was around in 1890. It looks an awful lot like what we see today. It is the simplest mode of transport we have. Don't try to make rocket science out of two wheels and four sets of bearings. Just buy and ride what you like.
Bookie512 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-18, 12:54 AM
  #27  
n0+4c|u3 
a fish on a bicycle
 
n0+4c|u3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Central Valley, California
Posts: 743

Bikes: 1991 KHS Montana Comp, 1990 Specialized RockHopper, 1996 Specialized HardRock, 1996 Specialized RockHopper, 1965 Schwinn Typhoon, 1954 Schwinn Wasp, Late 90's Huffy Manbrook (Cranbrook), 1989 Bianchi Super Grizzly

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 277 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Bookie512 View Post
Don't try to make rocket science out of two wheels and four sets of bearings.
Can't get away from that pesky rocket science.
Just buy and ride what you like.
+1
n0+4c|u3 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-18, 03:36 AM
  #28  
Rollfast
What happened?
 
Rollfast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Around here somewhere
Posts: 6,521

Bikes: No. 7 now sitting in a box in the living room

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1093 Post(s)
You don't have enough posts to do that. You've also posted to the wrong section, but a moderator can fix that, hang on.
__________________
Mrs. Reagan also taught me to Just Say No To Shifting, and be kind to elderly single speeds.
Rollfast is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-18, 12:59 PM
  #29  
juniorswv
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Milton Wv
Posts: 51

Bikes: schwinn Gateway...schwinn corvette 3 speed..stripped to bare metal..Huffy Cranbrook...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Really is hard to beat a Huffy or Schwinn for the price...nice cruisers for the buck...if you are on a budget or retired on limited income (like me) best why to go...Enjoy
juniorswv is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-18, 08:52 PM
  #30  
Jax Rhapsody
Rhapsodic Laviathan
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 511

Bikes: Rideable; 83 Schwinn High Sierra. Two cruiser, bmx bike, one other mtb, three road frames, one citybike.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
Frame tube question:

Most Cruisers have curved frame tubings.
The curves usually seem unnecessary to me.
And proby weighs alittle more than straight tubes.


Is it that curved tubings are more flexy...hence give a smoother ride?

Or is it just for style?
You mean cantilevered frames? It's just a design. Much like the straight bar frame(see the blue one) are simply classic designs of original designs.
Jax Rhapsody is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-18, 11:42 PM
  #31  
Rollfast
What happened?
 
Rollfast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Around here somewhere
Posts: 6,521

Bikes: No. 7 now sitting in a box in the living room

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1093 Post(s)
The correct Rollfast answer is WORKING, unless you want to fix or modify it.

Cantilevered frames are often known for strength, especially the Schwinns. After 1983 or so they cease being made in Chicago, the classic brazing techniques start to become lost and Murray steps in to make them. By the 90s as the 1995 centenary approaches the then owners of Schwinn have to relearn these things to produce that year's models as close to the original design as possible. It is NOT a complete reproduction...things like the axles are metric and for all but the premium models a sunken 6mm hex bolt is used in the stem. HATE THAT.

There are no old school bikes being built now, Schwinns and Huffys are built by the same overseas company and the Schwinn cantilever frames are much the same as the Huffys ala Cranbrook. Electra was bought by Trek, I don't know what state Gary Fisher is in anymore, and I have a 95 Schwinn Cruiser SS as well as a c. 1954 straightbar Hornet, three Rollfasts and a 1946 Shelby. I kid that it's the only thing I have as old as my mom that has tubes but no capacitors.
__________________
Mrs. Reagan also taught me to Just Say No To Shifting, and be kind to elderly single speeds.
Rollfast is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-18, 10:08 PM
  #32  
runSPOTrun
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
I've been riding cruisers for years, and have to agree with most of the above posts. If you are looking for a "commuter" cruiser you're going to want to go higher end such as the Raleigh posted above, or else you are going to want to do some mods. Most cruisers come with an American or 1 piece crank with loose bearings in the bottom bracket, and with the weight and angle of the push, this system tends to fail after a few hundred miles. It's not too hard to convert to a sealed bearing and 3 piece crank set that will last for years and allow for easy customisation of gear ratio/chain ring size...as always when altering a drivetrain, make sure to keep a straight chainline! A conversion kit with a sealed bearing set to go with it should run you about $60-$100 and takes about an hour to install if you have a basic working knowledge of bottom brackets...hammer out the races (cups), install converter, and screw in bearing set...pretty simple. All parts should be available at your local bike shop (along with a clean used 3 piece crankset), and the local mechanix are usually happy to give you pointers and make sure your getting the proper parts. Make sure you bring in the bike your converting so the mechanic or parts specialist can help you with the right stuff the first time! All in all, with cruisers, it's all about finding a frame style you like then customising it beyond that. Good luck, and happy cruising!

Last edited by runSPOTrun; 06-14-18 at 10:12 PM.
runSPOTrun is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-18, 05:29 AM
  #33  
Don W
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 1

Bikes: Emory

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Cruiser history

Originally Posted by Jax Rhapsody View Post
You mean cantilevered frames? It's just a design. Much like the straight bar frame(see the blue one) are simply classic designs of original designs.
From what I've been told by someone who used to make a cruiser in Jacksonville, FL, the cantilevered frame was initially designed back in 1930s when many families couldn't afford bikes for each member. The cantilevered frame together with a long seat post allowed riders of significantly different heights to ride the same bike.
Wikipedia has a cruiser bicycle history page that indicates the design was meant to evoke a motorcycle, which seems consistent with the fake gas tank on may early cruisers. Remember the Western Flyers? From the Wikipedia article, " Schwinn adapted features from the Henderson and Excelsior motorcycles that his (formerly purchased) bankrupt company had built during the 1920s, including a heavy "cantilevered" frame with two top tubes and 2.125-inch-wide (54.0 mm) "balloon" tires".
It's possible that the one-size-fits-all aspect of the bike was a lucky coincidence of the design that led to the cruiser's popularity.

Last edited by Don W; 06-18-18 at 05:31 AM. Reason: Improve clarity
Don W is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-18, 04:27 PM
  #34  
Jax Rhapsody
Rhapsodic Laviathan
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 511

Bikes: Rideable; 83 Schwinn High Sierra. Two cruiser, bmx bike, one other mtb, three road frames, one citybike.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Originally Posted by runSPOTrun View Post
I've been riding cruisers for years, and have to agree with most of the above posts. If you are looking for a "commuter" cruiser you're going to want to go higher end such as the Raleigh posted above, or else you are going to want to do some mods. Most cruisers come with an American or 1 piece crank with loose bearings in the bottom bracket, and with the weight and angle of the push, this system tends to fail after a few hundred miles. It's not too hard to convert to a sealed bearing and 3 piece crank set that will last for years and allow for easy customisation of gear ratio/chain ring size...as always when altering a drivetrain, make sure to keep a straight chainline! A conversion kit with a sealed bearing set to go with it should run you about $60-$100 and takes about an hour to install if you have a basic working knowledge of bottom brackets...hammer out the races (cups), install converter, and screw in bearing set...pretty simple. All parts should be available at your local bike shop (along with a clean used 3 piece crankset), and the local mechanix are usually happy to give you pointers and make sure your getting the proper parts. Make sure you bring in the bike your converting so the mechanic or parts specialist can help you with the right stuff the first time! All in all, with cruisers, it's all about finding a frame style you like then customising it beyond that. Good luck, and happy cruising!
In all my life, I've only destroyed one ashtabula crank, and it was on a 90s huffy mtb. Keep them greased and tightend and they'll last thousands of miles. They've existed for decades. My issue is they're ugly.
Jax Rhapsody is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-18, 10:27 PM
  #35  
n0+4c|u3 
a fish on a bicycle
 
n0+4c|u3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Central Valley, California
Posts: 743

Bikes: 1991 KHS Montana Comp, 1990 Specialized RockHopper, 1996 Specialized HardRock, 1996 Specialized RockHopper, 1965 Schwinn Typhoon, 1954 Schwinn Wasp, Late 90's Huffy Manbrook (Cranbrook), 1989 Bianchi Super Grizzly

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 277 Post(s)
Flipped one of these a few years ago. It had a KT 2 speed kickback coaster brake hub with issues so I got it pretty cheap.
I fixed it and rode it for a few weeks before posting it to the list of craig.
It was very comfortable to ride, but it was low geared to overcome the extra rolling resistance of the large tires.

Originally Posted by 805Speed View Post
Maybe check out 3G's website? They have a lot of variety. I have a couple with the forward bottom bracket position frame and it is the most comfortable bike I have ever owned.

n0+4c|u3 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-18, 07:56 AM
  #36  
55murray
Senior Member
 
55murray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Lafayette, Indiana
Posts: 272

Bikes: 1955 20" Murray modified cruiser, 2010 Nishiki Colorado MTB, 1980 Miyata 610, several other vintage coaster brake machines

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Originally Posted by juniorswv View Post
Really is hard to beat a Huffy or Schwinn for the price...nice cruisers for the buck...if you are on a budget or retired on limited income (like me) best why to go...Enjoy
Yep. With cruisers you get a lot of value for the dollar. A simple frame with no cheap suspension. A solid coaster break, no super cheap derailleurs, shifters, cassettes and chainrings.
55murray is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-18, 01:05 PM
  #37  
Crossthreaded88
Senior Member
 
Crossthreaded88's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Dogtown, CA. USA
Posts: 120

Bikes: Cannondale M500, Electra Cruiser 7, Schwinn Cruiser 3 2003 retro, Trek Calipso Cruiser 7sp, Dyno Taboo Tiki, Dyno Moon Eyes, Dyno Duece, Dyno Moto 7

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
I know nothing about cruisers, but see 'em all the time at work...lots of different brands from Workman
to Huffy. They all look like ramshackle rusty junk...sit outdoor all the time.
But they seem to ride pretty nice, even with all that rust. Some feel pretty comforable...some feels really awkward and uncomfortable.

If you're a bike snob and you had $1000 to spend on a Cruiser for multi-purpose use that's durable and relatively light weight, what would it be?

Something small for a 5'7" person.
Maybe 3 speed hub.
"Best Cruiser" is a little hard to pin down. What's the best club in a golf bag or the best fruit in a bowl? It's all subject to individual tastes. I'm not saying you are a snob but since you pose the question.... I have a Trek Calipso 7 speed aluminum frame, fenders, plush seat, nice grips and bars it fits me well and I enjoy riding it. It hits most of the marks you seem to be interested in. It's a Trek so they usually go with higher quality components but you can always upgrade to XT or better if you like.I also have a Electra Lux 7 (pre Trek buy out) which is the same only different from the Trek. Internal geared bikes are the coolest thing ever with straight chain line and no clicky derailleur to mess with. Pricey but worth it, best bet is to have custom wheels made just the way you want them. You don't have to spend $1000 but maybe close depending how nice the nice you're looking for. I envy you on the trip ahead for you choosing the base frame and all the components to bolt on. Just remember you'll have to protect your investment with a heavy duty lock to thwart bike thieves. Rusty ramshackle is intentional to keep it safe.
Crossthreaded88 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-18, 01:36 PM
  #38  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
mtb_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 2,824
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1955 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Jax Rhapsody View Post
In all my life, I've only destroyed one ashtabula crank, and it was on a 90s huffy mtb. Keep them greased and tightend and they'll last thousands of miles. They've existed for decades. My issue is they're ugly.
Ashtabula crank is a excellent design. The bearings are big. Big bearings ...equals better durability and longevity and strenght.
mtb_addict is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-18, 02:53 PM
  #39  
Jax Rhapsody
Rhapsodic Laviathan
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 511

Bikes: Rideable; 83 Schwinn High Sierra. Two cruiser, bmx bike, one other mtb, three road frames, one citybike.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Crossthreaded88 View Post
"Best Cruiser" is a little hard to pin down. What's the best club in a golf bag or the best fruit in a bowl? It's all subject to individual tastes. I'm not saying you are a snob but since you pose the question.... I have a Trek Calipso 7 speed aluminum frame, fenders, plush seat, nice grips and bars it fits me well and I enjoy riding it. It hits most of the marks you seem to be interested in. It's a Trek so they usually go with higher quality components but you can always upgrade to XT or better if you like.I also have a Electra Lux 7 (pre Trek buy out) which is the same only different from the Trek. Internal geared bikes are the coolest thing ever with straight chain line and no clicky derailleur to mess with. Pricey but worth it, best bet is to have custom wheels made just the way you want them. You don't have to spend $1000 but maybe close depending how nice the nice you're looking for. I envy you on the trip ahead for you choosing the base frame and all the components to bolt on. Just remember you'll have to protect your investment with a heavy duty lock to thwart bike thieves. Rusty ramshackle is intentional to keep it safe.
The best fruit in the bowl is probably a pear. The best club is the one that survives being flung and bashed on the ground when you screw up a swing.
Jax Rhapsody is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-18, 10:47 PM
  #40  
n0+4c|u3 
a fish on a bicycle
 
n0+4c|u3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Central Valley, California
Posts: 743

Bikes: 1991 KHS Montana Comp, 1990 Specialized RockHopper, 1996 Specialized HardRock, 1996 Specialized RockHopper, 1965 Schwinn Typhoon, 1954 Schwinn Wasp, Late 90's Huffy Manbrook (Cranbrook), 1989 Bianchi Super Grizzly

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 277 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Jax Rhapsody View Post
The best fruit in the bowl is probably a pear. The best club is the one that survives being flung and bashed on the ground when you screw up a swing.
My mandarinquat tree disagrees with you, and the best club...
__________________
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
This forum is not "everybody" but a few people's Opinions ... carry on..
n0+4c|u3 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-18, 11:52 PM
  #41  
Rollfast
What happened?
 
Rollfast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Around here somewhere
Posts: 6,521

Bikes: No. 7 now sitting in a box in the living room

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1093 Post(s)
Thumbs up

Originally Posted by n0+4c|u3 View Post
Can't get away from that pesky rocket science.

+1
Rocket science can be fun fellas...


She invented fuel for the Redstone/Jupiter-C!



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Sherman_Morgan
__________________
Mrs. Reagan also taught me to Just Say No To Shifting, and be kind to elderly single speeds.
Rollfast is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-18, 03:12 PM
  #42  
Rollfast
What happened?
 
Rollfast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Around here somewhere
Posts: 6,521

Bikes: No. 7 now sitting in a box in the living room

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1093 Post(s)
Smile

Originally Posted by Onyxaxe View Post
That's pretty high if you're not a collector. Expect it to be heavy with a one piece crank that takes 1/2 pedals. As far as cruiser bikes go Made In USA isn't necessarily better than Made in China, especially if it's over 20 years old. Even if it looks mint it'll probably need to be worked on. Nice bike though. My opinions on from a commuters point of view. Beach Cruisers can weigh around 40 pounds. My heaviest road bike is 31 lbs and I'm sick of it lol. It only has one gear and I live around a s(*& of hills though.
Murrays were the go-to after Schwinn closed up production in Chicago and they are worth the $100 in good shape. Note that even Murray isn't there anymore (except for their LAWN MOWER line, there are no bikes).

You are paying for provenance as much as performance, and you'll have to deal with people who heard it's the new 'gold' and have to pay bills. The funny thing about our economic system is that the market charges what the consumer is willing to pay and tapers off as demand at that price falls off. Not everyone can get by trying to be as cheap as ME ...on the other hand, I've spent an average of $300 on my vintage bikes before adding tanks etc. Parts are where the $$$ come from...have you noticed that when a piece of vintage STEREO gear doesn't sell they will part it out for more than the original price of the complete unit?

Here is your advice. Get a bike in as good shape and complete as you can, a rider if you can. What you do to if after that is not important. You are going to shovel the sheckels into a tidy hole for it anyway. Don't get a beater, you will be beaten if you don't know what to do. My assumption it that you don't want a hassle, you want a bike. If you want it to restore or customize make sure that you do have n+1, just like that guy with a classic 50s car or truck project has another car for getting to work and getting parts.

So again I say the Murray is worth it, in good running condition. The '80s one were well built and they also built store bikes here and there (my old Western Flyer had M.O.M on the headbadge, Murray Ohio Manufacturing) and they managed to resist the AMF Borg long after Roadmaster, H.P. Snyder/D.P. Harris (Hiawatha/Hawthorne/Rollfast etc) were assimilated...and AMF fell apart from it's own size (look it up, they became part of the 'military-industrial complex' Eisenhower spoke of and then had to sell everything off because of the hemorrhaging, maybe Brunswick bowling is sort of left).

If that's worth $100 to you, spend it. Do your homework, kick the tires, and do what you like. I was given my current 1995 Schwinn Cruiser SS as a gift by a nice guy years ago but that was compassion and the 25 cent Roland TR-808 Rhythm Composer I got at a thrift store to save from the dumpster may never get fixed because the parts aren't available...but I can smile and say I have a broken thing worth $4,000 on eBay and will still fix it.

Some things are practical and others you just do. In the end it's your decision. You decide if you want to follow the other lemmings over a cliff, that was their problem
__________________
Mrs. Reagan also taught me to Just Say No To Shifting, and be kind to elderly single speeds.
Rollfast is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-18, 10:04 AM
  #43  
Nighttrain
Senior Member
 
Nighttrain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Isle of Palms, SC
Posts: 78

Bikes: Pinarello Prince that's cracked at the bb weld

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Jax Rhapsody View Post
In all my life, I've only destroyed one ashtabula crank, and it was on a 90s huffy mtb. Keep them greased and tightend and they'll last thousands of miles. They've existed for decades. My issue is they're ugly.
A few weeks ago this one failed resulting in a 1 leg pedal home 😂
Nighttrain is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-18, 05:38 PM
  #44  
n0+4c|u3 
a fish on a bicycle
 
n0+4c|u3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Central Valley, California
Posts: 743

Bikes: 1991 KHS Montana Comp, 1990 Specialized RockHopper, 1996 Specialized HardRock, 1996 Specialized RockHopper, 1965 Schwinn Typhoon, 1954 Schwinn Wasp, Late 90's Huffy Manbrook (Cranbrook), 1989 Bianchi Super Grizzly

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 277 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Nighttrain View Post
A few weeks ago this one failed resulting in a 1 leg pedal home 😂


I've never seen one break in that location.
And I've NEVER seen an actual Ashtabula made crank break at all. I've bent the living crap out of them, but never broke.
__________________
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
This forum is not "everybody" but a few people's Opinions ... carry on..
n0+4c|u3 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-18, 11:14 AM
  #45  
Nighttrain
Senior Member
 
Nighttrain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Isle of Palms, SC
Posts: 78

Bikes: Pinarello Prince that's cracked at the bb weld

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Originally Posted by n0+4c|u3 View Post
I've never seen one break in that location.
And I've NEVER seen an actual Ashtabula made crank break at all. I've bent the living crap out of them, but never broke.
Iím afraid itís my curse in life. I break the unbreakable. Hopefully the titanium hip they just installed proves different. Iím off to the LBS to get a replacement Ashtabula crank. Itís no problem because it is time to service the BB plus the Brownell paint used on the broken cranks wasnít given time to cure properly.
Nighttrain is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-18, 09:55 AM
  #46  
bikescootoryak
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cruisers

I have a great deal of experience with cruisers. Basically depends where you are riding trails, beach, road, gravel, etc. Anything near the beach aluminum is light but corrodes over time and salt air will break it down. Steel frames will rust but are more durable if you are riding on the beach. A little bit of wax on the frames once a week goes a long way. If your going to invest in a cruiser for anything near the ocean stay away from Huffy, Firmstrong, Genesis, Sun and Jamis Taxi. Most are poorly constructed and cannot take the abuse of saltwater. Huffy makes a very uncomfortable bike in general poor frame geometry and your weight is on the wrists, its great if you have kids and they are growing good first learner bike, hard to sell as there are thousands everywhere. Jamis Taxi while being a sturdy bike if the saltwater and air will corrode the chain guard and if it breaks near the bottom bracket you will not be able to fix it unless you know how to weld aluminum. Jamis Earthcruiser 1, 2 , Evo bikes hold up very well against the elements are are easy to repair and maintain. Additionally the Jamis Earthcruiser has forward pedal design and you weight is not on your wrists. All the cruiser bikes above weight specifications are 250lbs max before damage occurs to seat posts, spokes and wheels. The best cruiser is 3G they are pretty much indestructable aside from a tube or chain replacement. 3G's are lightweight wider tires, forward pedal design and on certain models they can hold 350lbs of rider and they were made for the beach.
bikescootoryak is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service