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How best do I go about getting my cruiser bike?

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How best do I go about getting my cruiser bike?

Old 06-27-21, 12:34 AM
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AlbatrossWheeld
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How best do I go about getting my cruiser bike?

Hopefully people can point the way. I'm just getting back into bikes so I haven't repaired or bought one in a long time. Up to 25 years ago I used to do a lot with bikes, was able to put it all together on my own and make modification. but there's been a lot of changes since then. Back then I rode mountain, hybrid, and touring bikes, but now I want a cruiser. I've been doing some reading online and have a starting plan for what I want, but I figure first off I need to figure out what route to take to my goal. So far it looks like I can't just order such a specific bike as I have in mind. I'd appreciate insight as to how to reach my goal, if it's attainable. Right now I'm guessing since I'm not up to date on brands & what fits what I have to buy a pre-assembled bike that has as many of the main attributes as I can get, and then do modifications from there?... One of my problems is that several of the attributes I want are not quite cruiser attributes.


If it helps I'll list what I have in mind: Maybe someone has suggestions for what to buy, where to buy, what wouldn't work, etc.


Cruiser style frame; mens; kinda flexible as far as where upper bars go.

Aluminum. (not typically a cruiser metal)

Paint: A really nice dark royal blue. I haven't seen it on assembled order options, so it might have to be a special project.

Back sweeping handlebars.

7 Speeds. (It's hilly where I live)

Hand brakes. (not back pedal)

Wheels: I'm leaning toward Chrome OverSpoke 26-in wheels, but I haven't heard of them on a straight cruiser frame, only on low-rider frames)

Tires: Maxxis Hookworms, 26-in x 2.5-in. (I want & need smooooth rolling with decent grip)

I'm not worried about the seat right now.

I don't want front suspension.


Thanks for your insight.
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Old 06-27-21, 12:55 AM
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Originally Posted by AlbatrossWheeld View Post
Hopefully people can point the way. I'm just getting back into bikes so I haven't repaired or bought one in a long time. Up to 25 years ago I used to do a lot with bikes, was able to put it all together on my own and make modification. but there's been a lot of changes since then. Back then I rode mountain, hybrid, and touring bikes, but now I want a cruiser. I've been doing some reading online and have a starting plan for what I want, but I figure first off I need to figure out what route to take to my goal. So far it looks like I can't just order such a specific bike as I have in mind. I'd appreciate insight as to how to reach my goal, if it's attainable. Right now I'm guessing since I'm not up to date on brands & what fits what I have to buy a pre-assembled bike that has as many of the main attributes as I can get, and then do modifications from there?... One of my problems is that several of the attributes I want are not quite cruiser attributes.


If it helps I'll list what I have in mind: Maybe someone has suggestions for what to buy, where to buy, what wouldn't work, etc.


Cruiser style frame; mens; kinda flexible as far as where upper bars go.

Aluminum. (not typically a cruiser metal)

Paint: A really nice dark royal blue. I haven't seen it on assembled order options, so it might have to be a special project.

Back sweeping handlebars.

7 Speeds. (It's hilly where I live)

Hand brakes. (not back pedal)

Wheels: I'm leaning toward Chrome OverSpoke 26-in wheels, but I haven't heard of them on a straight cruiser frame, only on low-rider frames)

Tires: Maxxis Hookworms, 26-in x 2.5-in. (I want & need smooooth rolling with decent grip)

I'm not worried about the seat right now.

I don't want front suspension.


Thanks for your insight.
IMHO Look into the Electra 7D. It comes int steel or aluminum, 7speeds, hand brakes and with smooth tires. Everything is customizable Tons of options.
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Old 06-27-21, 04:52 AM
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OP, why aluminum? Are you traveling a lot where weight might be an issue? Isn't steel more comfy? I'm looking for a new cruiser too and from your list I agree with JehD, that a 7D should be on your short list.
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Old 06-27-21, 10:11 AM
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Priority makes a 3 speed belt drive aluminum in dark blue, you won't like the tires but could learn wheel lacing by swapping in a Nexus 7 hub.






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Old 06-27-21, 12:54 PM
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Red face

Thanks for the replies.

I need the bike to be pretty light and easy rolling because I have chronic Plantar Fasciitis (12 years maybe). A lighter and easier rolling bike will overall require less foot pressure, so less pain. That's why I'm hoping for aluminum, smooth rolling tires, 7 speeds for our hills. I don't want a motor though that looks like fun. I wish I could go heavier for that heavy cruiser ride, but I shouldn't. So I'm going for slow upright cruiser comfort in style.

I didn't see a 7 speed Electra, but I'll keep looking. Maybe it's an option. Or maybe I add it myself.

I hadn't looked at Priority bikes. Thanks for the heads up on them. ..."but could learn wheel lacing by swapping in a Nexus 7 hub"...oh man I've been out of the bike world a long time, I only maybe get what that means : )
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Old 06-28-21, 12:31 AM
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I get your issues with pain. I have arthritis and my knees couldnt handle trying to grind a single speed or the back pedaling of the coaster brake.

Here's a link for the 7D.
https://electra.trekbikes.com/us/en_...lorCode=bronze

Personally I like the feel of steel and I didn't think the aluminum frame and the seat upgrade were worth the $150 up charge. IMHO the few pounds more the steel weighs than the aluminum frame is only going to be felt if you're lifting the bike up and down. The gearing is low with the mega range freewheel making for easy starts and hills and its super smooth.I wont lie the base seat is not very comfortable and I replaced mine with a Brooks B135. Edit actually just swapped the Brooks B135 (put it on my Fatty) with a B33. its a little wider at the rear and cushier.

I know you were looking at Blue and this model only comes in matte black or a Matte Bark (bronze-ish) but it does look really good. They have a blue in a step through model which also might work as well. The Townies, also made by Electra come in a wider assortment of Colos and gearing. I was thempted to get the Path 9 but just like the look of the Cruiser frame. The Townies also get really good reviews.



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Old 06-28-21, 12:10 PM
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I need to reconsider steel. It's only a couple extra pounds and I'll never ride more than 15 miles or so at a casual pace. My other issue is that I live at the beach and have to deal with rust, but it's not a top concern. I like how you said you like the 'feel' of steel. I need to ride steel & aluminum back to back to refresh my brain on the difference in feel.


I've never seen seats with so many springs. The B33 looks firm on top while floating on springs? I'll have to read up on those.


My wife has the step thru Townie on her short list. Also a wildly colorful Vivelo.


How do you deal with the arthritis? I take it the lower gearing helps?
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Old 06-28-21, 01:14 PM
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Originally Posted by AlbatrossWheeld View Post
I need to reconsider steel. It's only a couple extra pounds and I'll never ride more than 15 miles or so at a casual pace. My other issue is that I live at the beach and have to deal with rust, but it's not a top concern. I like how you said you like the 'feel' of steel. I need to ride steel & aluminum back to back to refresh my brain on the difference in feel.


I've never seen seats with so many springs. The B33 looks firm on top while floating on springs? I'll have to read up on those.


My wife has the step thru Townie on her short list. Also a wildly colorful Vivelo.


How do you deal with the arthritis? I take it the lower gearing helps?
I think with a little care the rust will be a non issue. Keep in clean and it should be fine.

As far as the seats here is a link to a post where I was asking about a few different seats. The one on the bike is a B135. They make a wider version called the B190. I just replaced the 135 with a B33. Wider than the 135 but different springs. See the thread for a bunch of pictures.

Looking for a new Non Brooks seat..any thoughts on these?

As far as the arthritis, its what put me on a cruiser. The upright seating and relaxed handlebars take the stress off my wrists and shoulders and the low gearing helps get up the hills without abusing my knees. After seeing how good the saddle was I did buy a Fat tire bike, replaced the seat with the Brooks, added a stem extender and a shorter stem so I can sit upright and still go off road a little. I can't ride too far because my knees will get sore long before I get tired. On pavement maybe 10 miles or so is tops off road in the dirt maybe 5-6.
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Old 07-07-21, 01:34 PM
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Thanks for all the advice. When we walked into a small nearby bike shop yesterday & they had only one last remotely cruiser-like bike being the Townie Electra 7D I thought of your recommendation & my research & bought it for my wife (it was even her favorite color purple). They're hard to find now. She loves it. I like it a lot, but it feels maybe too light. Thanks again.

JehD, great to hear that with your arthritis you're still out there enjoying the ride! We have to adapt and live. Your bike sounds really comfortable.

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Old 07-07-21, 10:05 PM
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You could build it.
A cruiser bike is fairly simple.
Lots of people seem to celebrate that 1938, Frank Schwinn cantilever frame design that is now almost synonymous with cruisers. Almost every manufacturer has made cruisers with this frame style since about 1946 or so. The beach cruiser parts and accessories folks on the web and the bay that are based in and around Long Beach, California and Los Angeles California, sell new aftermarket steel cruiser frames of this style in variety of colors. I don't have a clue as to the frame size and overall dimensions, or where it was constructed, but for the seemingly low prices, one would guess they are welded, built, and painted in China. The potential problem with this build it yourself using such a nicely done new Chinese frame is that my guess is that more or less you have only a One Size frame, and though Americans on average are larger and taller than we were in the 1940's, 1950's, and 1960's, the cruiser frames on average from that Black & White Television era were larger in terms of wheelbase, center of bb to top of seat tube, and the length of distance between the seat-tube and the head-tube. I don't know why that is, but I suspect that when manufacturing shifted to Japan, Korea, Taiwan, in the 1970's, the manufacturing of such copy-cat cantilever cruiser frames were already being made for the Asian markets where folks are slightly smaller in physical size, and they simply retained that same overall sized frame and dimensions. The Chinese were a bicycle nation in the dark ages with no modern transportation, or modern anything when Nixon visited in 1972. Look at China now some 49 years later, there are quality manufacturers of nearly everything in mainland China.

One could for example look at the 1962 Corvette 5 speed as a sort of template to copy, except with better rear derailleur, and with a 7 speed rear wheel with better more useable gearing than from such an ancient Schwinn Corvette.

I know it sounds perhaps difficult to build, but heck the 559mm mountain bike wheel size originated long long ago with the cruisers (known as ordinary bicycles in the 1940's, 1950's and 1960's). An Ashtabula one piece crank is super simple and bullet proof. You can easily find something from anything from 36T to possibly 52T for a Single in the front. There are already a whole lotta various Chinese made PACIFIC CYCLE schwinns that have been made during the past twenty+ years that would provide acceptable frames and perhaps wheels............strip it down, repaint it dark royal blue (doesn't Rustoleum have such a color?)......how difficult is installing a quality rear derailleur and new shift cable and new brake cables, and pads? super simple. Greasing wheel bearings and bottom bracket's two caged bearings is ultra-simple.. You can choose from any number of steel chromed stems in various lengths and length of the top line of number seven 7........such that you can place whatever type of chromed steel handlebar shape configuration, old-or-new, however you'd want them for superb comfort and control. Don't like chrome.....well scuff it and paint it flat black............would rather have aluminum bars and stem......yeah you can do that but you gain really nothing as weight reduction is minimal and you have much more in the way of choices and different tourist handlebar shapes old from the 1930's to about 1980 that you could go, or with new aftmkt reproductions but be forewarned that Chrome quality of the past 30 years and of all new aftmkt reproductions is poor relative to used bars from Schwinn models from about 1958 to around 1980. Todays chrome bars are also worse on average than than the chrome quality on Kmart bicycles in 1977.
You have thousands of mountain bikes from the 1980's and 1990's from which to possibly source donor wheels etc.
You have thousands of Walmart/Target Huffies Panama Jack...Jimmy Buffet, Cranbrook, Del Lusso, and Pacific Cycle schwinns that have been made during the past twenty years for possible donor frames to paint and build up. Nobody will have a clue what low-buck Wallyworld box store bike that frame originated from. As long as the frame is reasonably sized to comfortly fit the intended rider, is all that probably matters because most everything else can be swapped out for nicer, better looking and more durable components.
Cruisers are simple. If you can disassemble a bicycle and reassemble it, you can build a cruiser. Is it simpler to just buy a cruiser? Well yes, absolutely, because you can buy and ride today, immediately, ... ..but it is increasingly difficult to get one that is exactly how you might want it to be.
That is just one suggested option for folks that might enjoy building their own cruiser. It is not practical for everyone, but might be fun for those folks who enjoy DIY and are already somewhat experienced with bicycles

Last edited by Vintage Schwinn; 07-07-21 at 10:08 PM.
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Old 07-11-21, 08:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Vintage Schwinn View Post
You could build it.

A cruiser bike is fairly simple.

Lots of people seem to celebrate that 1938, Frank Schwinn cantilever frame design that is now almost synonymous with cruisers. Almost every manufacturer has made cruisers with this frame style since about 1946 or so. The beach cruiser parts and accessories folks on the web and the bay that are based in and around Long Beach, California and Los Angeles California, sell new aftermarket steel cruiser frames of this style in variety of colors. I don't have a clue as to the frame size and overall dimensions, or where it was constructed, but for the seemingly low prices, one would guess they are welded, built, and painted in China. The potential problem with this build it yourself using such a nicely done new Chinese frame is that my guess is that more or less you have only a One Size frame, and though Americans on average are larger and taller than we were in the 1940's, 1950's, and 1960's, the cruiser frames on average from that Black & White Television era were larger in terms of wheelbase, center of bb to top of seat tube, and the length of distance between the seat-tube and the head-tube. I don't know why that is, but I suspect that when manufacturing shifted to Japan, Korea, Taiwan, in the 1970's, the manufacturing of such copy-cat cantilever cruiser frames were already being made for the Asian markets where folks are slightly smaller in physical size, and they simply retained that same overall sized frame and dimensions. The Chinese were a bicycle nation in the dark ages with no modern transportation, or modern anything when Nixon visited in 1972. Look at China now some 49 years later, there are quality manufacturers of nearly everything in mainland China.


One could for example look at the 1962 Corvette 5 speed as a sort of template to copy, except with better rear derailleur, and with a 7 speed rear wheel with better more useable gearing than from such an ancient Schwinn Corvette.


I know it sounds perhaps difficult to build, but heck the 559mm mountain bike wheel size originated long long ago with the cruisers (known as ordinary bicycles in the 1940's, 1950's and 1960's). An Ashtabula one piece crank is super simple and bullet proof. You can easily find something from anything from 36T to possibly 52T for a Single in the front. There are already a whole lotta various Chinese made PACIFIC CYCLE schwinns that have been made during the past twenty+ years that would provide acceptable frames and perhaps wheels............strip it down, repaint it dark royal blue (doesn't Rustoleum have such a color?)......how difficult is installing a quality rear derailleur and new shift cable and new brake cables, and pads? super simple. Greasing wheel bearings and bottom bracket's two caged bearings is ultra-simple.. You can choose from any number of steel chromed stems in various lengths and length of the top line of number seven 7........such that you can place whatever type of chromed steel handlebar shape configuration, old-or-new, however you'd want them for superb comfort and control. Don't like chrome.....well scuff it and paint it flat black............would rather have aluminum bars and stem......yeah you can do that but you gain really nothing as weight reduction is minimal and you have much more in the way of choices and different tourist handlebar shapes old from the 1930's to about 1980 that you could go, or with new aftmkt reproductions but be forewarned that Chrome quality of the past 30 years and of all new aftmkt reproductions is poor relative to used bars from Schwinn models from about 1958 to around 1980. Todays chrome bars are also worse on average than than the chrome quality on Kmart bicycles in 1977.

You have thousands of mountain bikes from the 1980's and 1990's from which to possibly source donor wheels etc.

You have thousands of Walmart/Target Huffies Panama Jack...Jimmy Buffet, Cranbrook, Del Lusso, and Pacific Cycle schwinns that have been made during the past twenty years for possible donor frames to paint and build up. Nobody will have a clue what low-buck Wallyworld box store bike that frame originated from. As long as the frame is reasonably sized to comfortly fit the intended rider, is all that probably matters because most everything else can be swapped out for nicer, better looking and more durable components.

Cruisers are simple. If you can disassemble a bicycle and reassemble it, you can build a cruiser. Is it simpler to just buy a cruiser? Well yes, absolutely, because you can buy and ride today, immediately, ... ..but it is increasingly difficult to get one that is exactly how you might want it to be.

That is just one suggested option for folks that might enjoy building their own cruiser. It is not practical for everyone, but might be fun for those folks who enjoy DIY and are already somewhat experienced with bicycles

Finally getting back to you. What a great post! I have to do this! I've always wondered if what I have to do is this, to build or rebuild my own. I've got this image of how I want to ride & most of the colors. I'm still fine tuning the feel I want. The more it takes shape in specifics the more it demands customization. Growing up, my buddies and I rebuilt & built from packing ball bearings to jumping ramp to ramp over appliances, bmx and 10-speeds. I had a Schwinn Varsity. Heavy as a boat anchor, but tough as one too.


As the plan takes shape I'll probably have to buy something simpler for this summer to ride with my wife, then do this rebuild project in the garage over the winter. It'll take me quite a bit of time. One of the current challenges I see is how to adapt a 7-Speed rear system to a cruiser bike frame. I haven't even looked into it, but I keep reading how most cruiser wheels have space for single gearing, but not 7 gears. I've seen cruiser 7-speeds for sale so it is possible, I even saw a steel framed cruiser with 7 speeds online today (though sold out). Seems rare.
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Old 07-12-21, 06:06 AM
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sixthreezero makes cruiser bikes along with Electra, Detroit type..etc
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Old 08-02-21, 12:33 PM
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Trying to piece together a bike is quite frustrating and expensive. It is better to be patient and buy a couple or few bikes on craigslist that have some (or all)of what you are looking for.. Cruiser componentry hasn't changed at all in the past 60 years, (stem eand seatpost sizes may vary) Derailleur cruisers are almost all 7 speed, and have been since about 1995.

The Electra Townie or Cruiser Lux 7d are good aluminum bikes. The Lux 7d is not as common as the steel 7d. But they still aren't heavy like a 1953 Schwinn Hornet

electra uses stainless steel hardware (an added plus)
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Old 08-05-21, 01:10 PM
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Originally Posted by restlessswind View Post
Trying to piece together a bike is quite frustrating and expensive. It is better to be patient and buy a couple or few bikes on craigslist that have some (or all)of what you are looking for.. Cruiser componentry hasn't changed at all in the past 60 years, (stem eand seatpost sizes may vary) Derailleur cruisers are almost all 7 speed, and have been since about 1995.


The Electra Townie or Cruiser Lux 7d are good aluminum bikes. The Lux 7d is not as common as the steel 7d. But they still aren't heavy like a 1953 Schwinn Hornet


electra uses stainless steel hardware (an added plus)

Thank you very much. I've been thinking in this direction lately. Find the frame I like and modify from there. And I think I've found (online) the frame I want...you know it...the Electra Cruiser Lux 7D. I was leaning toward a steel/heavier ride, but I live at the beach so aluminum makes a lot of sense. I've even found details I want: I like that pointed V-shape they can have on the frame at the back wheel hub, and I like a chain ring part (right name? disc part of the crank) that has round cut-outs. Overall it seems kinda art-deco to me. I'll try to attach a pic of a green one I've seen for sale on Craigslist in Eugene, OR. Problem with that one is it's called excellent, but it has several Major dents, scratches, scrapes, etc, even on the frame (esp left side at curve at front of rear tire). I don't mind a repaint & rebuild, but serious dents in the frame?... All bikes seem hard to buy these days, let alone a specific model. This style of Lux looks older than the ones I currently see on Electra's website, close but different.


Attaching my jpg isn't working. Here's the craigslist ad for anyone interested:


https://eugene.craigslist.org/bik/d/...349600852.html
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Old 08-05-21, 04:57 PM
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That is a steel one. You can tell the aluminum (lux) models' all have a 3 piece crankset. The steel ones use the old single piece crank, as does the one in the ad you posted.

I don't see any dents. Thee might be a slight dent or crease on the chainguard, but it looks really clean. Are referring to the curve of the seat stay tube over the rear wheel? It is just shaped that way

Originally Posted by AlbatrossWheeld View Post
Thank you very much. I've been thinking in this direction lately. Find the frame I like and modify from there. And I think I've found (online) the frame I want...you know it...the Electra Cruiser Lux 7D. I was leaning toward a steel/heavier ride, but I live at the beach so aluminum makes a lot of sense. I've even found details I want: I like that pointed V-shape they can have on the frame at the back wheel hub, and I like a chain ring part (right name? disc part of the crank) that has round cut-outs. Overall it seems kinda art-deco to me. I'll try to attach a pic of a green one I've seen for sale on Craigslist in Eugene, OR. Problem with that one is it's called excellent, but it has several Major dents, scratches, scrapes, etc, even on the frame (esp left side at curve at front of rear tire). I don't mind a repaint & rebuild, but serious dents in the frame?... All bikes seem hard to buy these days, let alone a specific model. This style of Lux looks older than the ones I currently see on Electra's website, close but different.


Attaching my jpg isn't working. Here's the craigslist ad for anyone interested:


https://eugene.craigslist.org/bik/d/...349600852.html

Last edited by restlessswind; 08-05-21 at 05:04 PM.
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Old 08-05-21, 09:13 PM
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Not sure of the year but steel can take a beating. Way back in the 70s I had a post war Schwinn and I was like the 5th (6th-8th?) owner. I bought it to deliver papers from the previous kid that delivered papers. While I was the final owner it wasn’t because of rust and this was in Pa with rain and winter snow ect.

These are nice solid bikes and the only real upgrade you need are the seat and maybe pedals. The base seat is pretty meh and I’m a fan of bear traps so that what I’ve got.
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Old 08-23-21, 04:20 AM
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Originally Posted by restlessswind View Post
Trying to piece together a bike is quite frustrating and expensive. It is better to be patient and buy a couple or few bikes on craigslist that have some (or all)of what you are looking for.. Cruiser componentry hasn't changed at all in the past 60 years, (stem eand seatpost sizes may vary) Derailleur cruisers are almost all 7 speed, and have been since about 1995.

The Electra Townie or Cruiser Lux 7d are good aluminum bikes. The Lux 7d is not as common as the steel 7d. But they still aren't heavy like a 1953 Schwinn Hornet

electra uses stainless steel hardware (an added plus)
It's not always expensive. I'm currently building a SS and the only things I've bought for it are; brake levers, rear wheel, chain, pedals. And I'll be buying a rear brake cable housing. The front wheel, brake calipers, handle bars, chainring were free or trade from the co-op, front cable housing I already had. The cables will be free from the co-op, and I'm probably going to use an old innertube as bartape.
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Old 08-23-21, 10:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Jax Rhapsody View Post
It's not always expensive. I'm currently building a SS and the only things I've bought for it are; brake levers, rear wheel, chain, pedals. And I'll be buying a rear brake cable housing. The front wheel, brake calipers, handle bars, chainring were free or trade from the co-op, front cable housing I already had. The cables will be free from the co-op, and I'm probably going to use an old innertube as bartape.
Inner tube for bar tape? Does that work OK? How long does it last? Interesting idea.
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Old 08-24-21, 07:10 AM
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I would not waste the time using an inner tube to replace bat tape. Way to flexible and sticky. Roger
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Old 08-25-21, 03:10 AM
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Originally Posted by SkinGriz View Post
Inner tube for bar tape? Does that work OK? How long does it last? Interesting idea.
It would last a while. I haven't done it by itself, yet. I do have a pair of handlebars from my ratrod, double wrapped with them and leather from a leather coat. Wrapped so each material is exposed- held up fine so far, it was done in 2018.
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Old 08-25-21, 03:21 AM
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Originally Posted by rhenning View Post
I would not waste the time using an inner tube to replace bat tape. Way to flexible and sticky. Roger
Inner tubes aren't sticky. I have a theory they might black my hands, but I won't know until I try it and it won't cost me anything but time. Won't be fancy like some lizardskin, or supercaz tape, but this bike doesn't need to be all matchy and win the single speed portion of some bike concourse... hell; I'm sticker bombing the frame, the wheels don't match outside of color and hubs, it has a Tiagra and Sora brake calipers, and one of them looks green.
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Old 08-31-21, 07:06 PM
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Originally Posted by SkinGriz View Post
Inner tube for bar tape? Does that work OK? How long does it last? Interesting idea.
So I did one side, and it's not bad, might not be as great and posh as lizardskin- it's comfortable, grips on itself under tension, no black stuff on my hands, yet. At this point; the only downfall I can see is posible sun bleaching.
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Old 09-05-21, 07:27 PM
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The speed is break neck, faster than a high speed dual cassette tape deck.
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Old 01-28-22, 06:21 AM
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Originally Posted by lucifer2 View Post
The speed is break neck, faster than a high speed dual cassette tape deck.
It's from a MF Doom song. On Vaudeville Villain, I think.
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Old 01-28-22, 06:43 AM
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Originally Posted by SkinGriz View Post
Inner tube for bar tape? Does that work OK? How long does it last? Interesting idea.
Originally Posted by rhenning View Post
I would not waste the time using an inner tube to replace bat tape. Way to flexible and sticky. Roger
Seeing as it's been a while; I've ridden that bike with innertube bartape all last year, and I have concluded that it's a perfectly viable option, ergo I didn't waste time using it. Vulcanized rubber ain't sticky. It hadn't faded in the hot sun, or dirtied my hand, nor were they sore from long rides, or out of saddle sprinting. They surely aren't slippery, my hands don't really sweat, so I don't know of that aspect, but I imagine they'd hold up, and definitely won't absorb it and rot the bars.
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