Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

130 mm hub in 135 mm dropouts

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

130 mm hub in 135 mm dropouts

Old 03-27-15, 12:49 PM
  #1  
himespau 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 11,495
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2054 Post(s)
Liked 555 Times in 322 Posts
130 mm hub in 135 mm dropouts

I have a new (to me) frame coming my way in the mail. Its rear triangle is spaced for 135 mm x 700c wheels. I only have wheelsets (including one I haven't used before that otherwise would be perfect for this bike) with hubs that have 130 mm axles on them. Is there a way I can use a wheel I already have?

Can I just disassemble the hub (shimano tiagra from 3-4 years back) like I was going to clean/repack the bearings but instead swap out the axle for one that is 5 mm longer? Would I need new quick release too? I assume I'd need 2.5 mm washers to put between the hub and the dropout on each side to make the spacing work (so I don't have to re-dish 2.5 mm on each side would be better than 5 mm on one, right?). Are there washers made specifically that'd work for this?

thanks.
himespau is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 12:53 PM
  #2  
FastJake
Constant tinkerer
 
FastJake's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 7,777
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Liked 35 Times in 29 Posts
Close. One 5mm washer on the left side and a re-dish is the correct way to do it so the wheel becomes stronger and your distance from the right dropout to the cassette doesn't get too big. You don't actually need a new axle. With an extra 5mm you'll have less axle protrusion but you'll still have enough. You may or may not need a new quick release skewer.
FastJake is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 12:54 PM
  #3  
dr_lha
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 4,843

Bikes: 2016 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross v5, 2015 Ritchey Road Logic, 1998 Specialized Rockhopper, 2017 Raleigh Grand Prix

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 374 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 8 Posts
If the frame is steel you can effectively bend the frame to make it work with the 130mm wheel. Not such a good idea for carbon or aluminum though. Usually that's for making the frame wider though, not narrower.

Sheldon: Bicycle Frame/Hub Spacing
dr_lha is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 01:04 PM
  #4  
himespau 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 11,495
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2054 Post(s)
Liked 555 Times in 322 Posts
I've used a couple of different methods to respace a rear triangle before (had most success with threaded rod), but would rather not go that route this time.

I really don't need a new axle? That'd make things easier (not sure enough to make up for the redishing though - I'm not good on the truing stand. Where would I find the correct washers? Just the hardware store? Or are there ready made spacers for this kind of thing?
himespau is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 01:09 PM
  #5  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 42,551

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 194 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7317 Post(s)
Liked 915 Times in 577 Posts
Where would I find the correct washers? Just the hardware store? Or are there ready made spacers for this kind of thing?
Word: Rear Axle Spacers.... Visit Your Local Bike Shoppe. They can make it all work .

re center the wheel after using 5mm less Axle spacer and re doing the hub axle to be centered 2.5mm longer on both sides

But also at the LBS would Be a Rear wheel discarded after a MTB rider thrashed the rim ,
there you can get a whole typical Shimano Freehub steel axle assembly for Cheap . (skewer And All)

Last edited by fietsbob; 03-27-15 at 02:17 PM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 01:10 PM
  #6  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Short term use, there's enough flex in the system to simply bring both sides to the wheel via the QR skewer. Depending on the stiffness of the rear triangle you might have to back off the QR and use it as a screw jack before using the lever. Otherwise, a bit of hand compression as you guide in the wheel does the trick.

This is fine for occasional use, though long term, you'll want to add 5mm to the left and redish the wheel, so the cassette's position relative to the right dropout is unchanged. Usually you can get by without a new axle, having 3mm per side for the frame to rest on vs. the original 5.5mm, but that's OK because it's not going anyplace.

In most cases you will need a new QR sewer, since very few have an extra 5mm of thread engagement at the nut.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 01:26 PM
  #7  
Bill Kapaun
Really Old Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 11,720

Bikes: 87 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1008 Post(s)
Liked 227 Times in 178 Posts
Correcting the dish for your scenario is about the easiest "wheel building" task there is.
Simply tighten the NDS spokes in small increments until you have the correct dish.
Unless you wheel is already at maximum tension and ready to "burst", you won't increase overall tension too significantly.
IF you want to take it a bit further, back off the DS spokes about 1/2 as much as you tighten NDS and your overall tension will be very close to original.

Assuming it's an FH-4500 hub, you would change NDS/DS spoke tension from 52 to 63%. That's MUCH better.

Last edited by Bill Kapaun; 03-27-15 at 01:34 PM.
Bill Kapaun is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 01:40 PM
  #8  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 15 Posts
I always start the redish process by deciding about the tension. Whether I'm happy with it as is, or want to increase it slightly. Usually there's room to let it rise a bit as I shorten the left spokes 1/2 turn at a time, going around the wheel a few times as necessary. But if I feel I don't want to increase the overall tension, I start by loosening the right side first about a 1/2 turn once around, then tightening the left.

On wheels that are already very tight where the nipple torques are high, I may loosen the left side one turn all the way around to ease the tension, then loosen the right, then bring the left up incrementally until the dish in on target. This is a pain, and extra work, but sometimes necessary to avoid rounding right side nipples on older wheels.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 02:17 PM
  #9  
himespau 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 11,495
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2054 Post(s)
Liked 555 Times in 322 Posts
I think my mistake on dish last time (I'd built the wheel and got it about perfect with regards to tension and true without noticing that someone had bumped the stand so it was no longer centered - by about 4-5 mm) was that I tried both tightening the one side and loosening the other at the same time and totally went wrong. That and having that (my second wheelset build from scratch) being with 30 mm deep rims and relatively thin double butted spokes, led to a disaster of a wheel build that turned me off to the whole working on a wheel myself in any way involving spokes, but I should get back to it as I have a dynamo hub I want to build into a wheel at some point and don't want to stay afraid of it.

I guess it's time to find a local bike shop to stop in and ask about spacers (since moving here 2 years ago, I've only been to one when I couldn't get my triple FD to shift flawlessly and left with it adjusted worse than when I'd brought it in). Since this is going to be a permanent thing (and a ride for my wife) I'd rather it be done right rather than just a temporary fix. If that means longer axle, so be it. If not, that's cool too. I guess I'll check tension and re-dish. I'll dig around and see if I have any 135 mm skewers. If not, I can ask about that when I stop in for a spacer.
himespau is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 02:31 PM
  #10  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by himespau View Post
I think my mistake on dish last time .....was that I tried both tightening the one side and loosening the other at the same time and totally went wrong.
.
Just about every wheelbuilder learns fairly early on, that working sequential nipples left and right is an easy way to lose track and mess up. My handiest wheel building tool is the plastic clip from a bread bag. I pop it onto a spoke as a place keeper if interrupted, and also use a colored one as the start/stop marker, so I'm free to randomize where I start and stop when adding tension.

I build all new wheels overly dished to the right, then move the rim over as I add final tension and alignment using the left/slacker spokes exclusively. This spares me dealing with spoke twist on the tighter right side spokes.

email me (use the email link, not the PM next to my name) and I'll mail you a 5mm space.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 02:59 PM
  #11  
gsa103
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 4,148

Bikes: Bianchi Infinito (Celeste, of course)

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 630 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by dr_lha View Post
If the frame is steel you can effectively bend the frame to make it work with the 130mm wheel. Not such a good idea for carbon or aluminum though. Usually that's for making the frame wider though, not narrower.

Sheldon: Bicycle Frame/Hub Spacing
I would STRONGLY advise against re-spacing down to 130mm. 135mm is the standard spacing for all 29er mountain/hybrid bikes. Its a hassle to re-space a frame and you'd actually be loosing compatibility with wheels.
gsa103 is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 03:03 PM
  #12  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by gsa103 View Post
I would STRONGLY advise against re-spacing down to 130mm. 135mm is the standard spacing for all 29er mountain/hybrid bikes. Its a hassle to re-space a frame and you'd actually be loosing compatibility with wheels.
I agree, squeezing it down for a one shot situation might make sense, but unless you have a real reason to prize the wheels more than the bike, respacing the wheel makes FAR more sense than respacing the frame to something where you'll be respacing it back soon anyway.

Dishing the wheel is easy, and you can skate on the original axle, so it's only a matter of QR skewer.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 03:15 PM
  #13  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 24,536
Mentioned: 195 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11488 Post(s)
Liked 932 Times in 724 Posts
You can buy replacement axles for 135mm for not too much, often with extra spacers and cones.

I wouldn't mess with trying to use too short of an axle.

The point of the wider dropouts is less dishing and a stronger wheel. Put your spacers on the left, unless you're also using a wider cassette, but at this point, I don't think Shimano has an easy upgrade path from 10s to 11s.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 05:59 PM
  #14  
himespau 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 11,495
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2054 Post(s)
Liked 555 Times in 322 Posts
Oh yeah, I'm only doing 8 speed, so that's not an issue. I'd gotten the wheels for something else, but happened into a touring frame to build up for my wife that is spread wider (older Specialized Sequoia), so I'm going to use that instead. That'll give me plenty of room for wide tires, fenders and a rack. Strong axles are good. I'm confused because all the replacement axles I see are like 145 mm rather than 135. I'm assuming I'd have to cut off the excess if I did something like that? That doesn't sound like a lot of fun. Hopefully the LBS has one (or can order one) that's just the right size when I go there to get a skewer and spacer. I'll try the re-dish myself.
himespau is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 06:04 PM
  #15  
Bill Kapaun
Really Old Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 11,720

Bikes: 87 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1008 Post(s)
Liked 227 Times in 178 Posts
A QR axle is typically 11mm longer that the drop out spacing.
135 +11.
Your current axle is 141mm.
Bill Kapaun is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 06:13 PM
  #16  
FastJake
Constant tinkerer
 
FastJake's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 7,777
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Liked 35 Times in 29 Posts
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
You can buy replacement axles for 135mm for not too much, often with extra spacers and cones.

I wouldn't mess with trying to use too short of an axle.
I see it as not bothering to mess with replacing the axle. There's absolutely no functional difference. The wheel will still seat just fine in the dropouts before clamping down the skewer, at which point the axle protrusion isn't doing anything unless you don't tighten the skewer enough.
FastJake is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 08:37 PM
  #17  
himespau 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 11,495
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2054 Post(s)
Liked 555 Times in 322 Posts
Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
A QR axle is typically 11mm longer that the drop out spacing.
135 +11.
Your current axle is 141mm.
Oh duh, of course, have to take the thickness of the dropouts into account.
himespau is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 08:42 PM
  #18  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by FastJake View Post
I see it as not bothering to mess with replacing the axle. There's absolutely no functional difference. The wheel will still seat just fine in the dropouts before clamping down the skewer, at which point the axle protrusion isn't doing anything unless you don't tighten the skewer enough.
+1 3mm per side is plenty to support the dropout. It has no place to go anyway. BITD many dropouts were much thinner and axle extensions more in the 3-4mm range than the 5.5mm common today. We never had any issues with them, and the only time it became an issue was a long axle combined with a thin dropout.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 08:47 PM
  #19  
Jeff Wills
Insane Bicycle Mechanic
 
Jeff Wills's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: other Vancouver
Posts: 9,312
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 576 Post(s)
Liked 164 Times in 121 Posts
Originally Posted by himespau View Post
Can I just disassemble the hub (shimano tiagra from 3-4 years back) like I was going to clean/repack the bearings but instead swap out the axle for one that is 5 mm longer? .
I've done this with various Shimano hubs- 105 and Ultegra specifically. As others said, putting the 5mm spacer on the left side will reduce the offset (dish) and result in a stronger wheel. It must work- I wore the rim out on a wheel built this way and it had never needed truing. Quite an accomplishment under my 220, uhh... 230... uhh... 240 pound butt.
__________________
Jeff Wills

Comcast nuked my web page. It will return soon..
Jeff Wills is offline  
Old 03-27-15, 08:49 PM
  #20  
himespau 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 11,495
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2054 Post(s)
Liked 555 Times in 322 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
Just about every wheelbuilder learns fairly early on, that working sequential nipples left and right is an easy way to lose track and mess up. My handiest wheel building tool is the plastic clip from a bread bag. I pop it onto a spoke as a place keeper if interrupted, and also use a colored one as the start/stop marker, so I'm free to randomize where I start and stop when adding tension.

I build all new wheels overly dished to the right, then move the rim over as I add final tension and alignment using the left/slacker spokes exclusively. This spares me dealing with spoke twist on the tighter right side spokes.

email me (use the email link, not the PM next to my name) and I'll mail you a 5mm space.
That's a good idea of how to keep track. I know some people say they put a piece of tape on the spokes to track wind up. I guess I just got cocky because my first wheelset build went very well and I bit off more than I could chew the second time.
himespau is offline  
Old 03-28-15, 05:06 AM
  #21  
himespau 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 11,495
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2054 Post(s)
Liked 555 Times in 322 Posts
One, semi-related thing that I'm curious about, everyone always says that you can flex things a bit if you've got a steel frame (which is the case here) but only if you've got a steel frame. But I also have a vintage Canondale sports touring bike from the lat 80's. That (as all Canondales of the time) has a rear triangle spaced to 128 mm so you could go with a 6 speed freewheel hub or a 7 speed cassette hub. Is that a long term risk for cracking that I've been spreading it the 2 mm to slip my 130 mm hub in?
himespau is offline  
Old 03-28-15, 05:45 AM
  #22  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 22,693

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 111 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3342 Post(s)
Liked 796 Times in 503 Posts
Originally Posted by himespau View Post
One, semi-related thing that I'm curious about, everyone always says that you can flex things a bit if you've got a steel frame (which is the case here) but only if you've got a steel frame. But I also have a vintage Canondale sports touring bike from the lat 80's. That (as all Canondales of the time) has a rear triangle spaced to 128 mm so you could go with a 6 speed freewheel hub or a 7 speed cassette hub. Is that a long term risk for cracking that I've been spreading it the 2 mm to slip my 130 mm hub in?
I think you are having problems with wraping your head around the whole numbers of the metric system. A milimeter is a really tiny measurement. In terms of a bicycle frame, it's super tiny measurement. 2mm is slightly more than 1/16". Do you think 1/16" of an inch is a lot? 5mm is a bit more than 3/16" of an inch? Again, not a lot.

Sometimes that amount of flex is even designed into the frame. Cannondale touring bikes have 132.5mm dropouts so that you can use both 130mm and 135mm hubs.

Personally, I'd just put the wheel in the frame and flex it a tiny amount to make it fit and forget about it.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 03-28-15, 06:30 AM
  #23  
Willbird
Senior Member
 
Willbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Very N and Very W Ohio Williams Co.
Posts: 2,458

Bikes: 2001 Trek Multitrack 7200, 2104 Fuji Sportif 1.5

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I think you are having problems with wraping your head around the whole numbers of the metric system. A milimeter is a really tiny measurement. In terms of a bicycle frame, it's super tiny measurement. 2mm is slightly more than 1/16". Do you think 1/16" of an inch is a lot? 5mm is a bit more than 3/16" of an inch? Again, not a lot.

Sometimes that amount of flex is even designed into the frame. Cannondale touring bikes have 132.5mm dropouts so that you can use both 130mm and 135mm hubs.

Personally, I'd just put the wheel in the frame and flex it a tiny amount to make it fit and forget about it.
when metrics go to decimal it us even harder to kill old habits, an inspecter I knew would have his hair on fire about a +- .0125mm toleranced hole being one thousance out the too end of tolerance on a warm aluminum part, would have to gently remind him "John those are mm" hehe :-). .001mm is .000254".
Willbird is offline  
Old 03-28-15, 07:31 AM
  #24  
bradtx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Pearland, Texas
Posts: 7,577

Bikes: Cannondale, Trek, Raleigh, Santana

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 305 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by himespau View Post
One, semi-related thing that I'm curious about, everyone always says that you can flex things a bit if you've got a steel frame (which is the case here) but only if you've got a steel frame. But I also have a vintage Canondale sports touring bike from the lat 80's. That (as all Canondales of the time) has a rear triangle spaced to 128 mm so you could go with a 6 speed freewheel hub or a 7 speed cassette hub. Is that a long term risk for cracking that I've been spreading it the 2 mm to slip my 130 mm hub in?
Short answer is no. I've had a series of 130 mm hubs in a 126 mm OLD Cannondale SR (shorter chain and seat stays) for about 20 years now without any issues. Only if there is some pre existing defect or damage would I not suggest using a wider spaced hub...then again if there is pre existing issues, it's probably going to break anyway.

Brad
bradtx is offline  
Old 03-28-15, 08:32 AM
  #25  
himespau 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 11,495
Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2054 Post(s)
Liked 555 Times in 322 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I think you are having problems with wraping your head around the whole numbers of the metric system. A milimeter is a really tiny measurement. In terms of a bicycle frame, it's super tiny measurement. 2mm is slightly more than 1/16". Do you think 1/16" of an inch is a lot? 5mm is a bit more than 3/16" of an inch? Again, not a lot.

Sometimes that amount of flex is even designed into the frame. Cannondale touring bikes have 132.5mm dropouts so that you can use both 130mm and 135mm hubs.

Personally, I'd just put the wheel in the frame and flex it a tiny amount to make it fit and forget about it.
No, I know how much a millimeter is. I just have issues when people say 2.5 mm flex on each side is bad for aluminum, but 1.25 (for those 132.5 hubs is ok). Hell, 2.5 mm is only 1/10". Where's the cuttoff? That's what I was asking. Is any flex bad or is it only flex over a certain point? What is that point? That's what I don't know.
himespau is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.