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135 hub on 130 rear spacing

Old 04-02-15, 11:27 PM
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135 hub on 130 rear spacing

I didn't realize that my alfine 8 igh hub (135 mm) doesn't fit most road and some cross frames, which are 130 mm spacing. It would be so much easier if I could just jam the hub in there and ride it, but I want to run it by the community for frames made of aluminum and carbon. Steel bikes are too heavy and prone to rust for my liking.
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Old 04-03-15, 12:36 AM
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IMO both will most likely have enough flex in the stays to spring open 5mm to accept the wider wheel. But neither can be spread permanently (cold set) to make wheel mounting easier
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Old 04-03-15, 01:22 AM
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Will it compromise durability in light touring or trail riding?
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Old 04-03-15, 05:47 AM
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My steel bike has 132.5mm spacing and I'm running a 135mm rear hub. I'll never go that route again. It's a PITA to spread the chainstays just to mount the rear wheel. I can't imagine what it would be like trying to stuff a 135 into a 130.
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Old 04-03-15, 06:25 AM
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I had the same issue on a build and in my case used thinner lock nuts to make it work. You could also machine down your lock nuts. It's not much material and will make life easier in the future with the wheel.
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Old 04-03-15, 06:58 AM
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This is precisely why I bought a Shimano Nexus 7-speed IGH with 130mm OLD to convert my Salsa Casseroll SS with its 130mm dropout spacing. Also it makes no sense to me to try and save weight with an aluminum or carbon frame and then use a very heavy IGH.
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Old 04-03-15, 07:36 AM
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Bad idea. You can cold set steel frame, however it's a PITA to get decent result. For example, you have to buy or have to DIY measuring gauge to check if chainstays were set to exactly +2.5 mm from each side. +2.4 and +2.6 is a recipe for disaster. Would you be THAT accurate? If no one forces you to do that sort of conversion, better either to buy new frame with 135 mm spacing or 130 mm hub. They do exist.

It is impossible to cold set aluminum and carbon frames.
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Old 04-03-15, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by corwin1968
My steel bike has 132.5mm spacing and I'm running a 135mm rear hub. I'll never go that route again. It's a PITA to spread the chainstays just to mount the rear wheel. I can't imagine what it would be like trying to stuff a 135 into a 130.

I really like frames that are spaced at 132.5 because I find it so easy to go with either a 135 or 130 mm rear wheel. That's the way my soma doublecross is set up and I have had no issues going back and forth between the 2 wheel size.

Nor is it a big deal to insert a 135 mm rear wheel into a (steel) rear triangle set at 130 mm. It is a bit tough the first time or two. I have two (steel) bikes set up that way and it has been a non-issue.
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Old 04-03-15, 08:03 AM
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Originally Posted by bikemig
I really like frames that are spaced at 132.5 because I find it so easy to go with either a 135 or 130 mm rear wheel.
My Surly Cross Check was also spaced 132.5 mm and either wheel width fit with little effort. It also had horizontal dropouts so adjusting the chain slack (note I didn't say tension) would have been easy if I used an IGH. As to steel frames rusting, it's also a non-issue if you spray Weigel's Frame Saver or Amsoil HDMP into all of the tubes.

Back in the early '90's I bought an aluminum frame Trek 1420 that was spaced 128 mm as it was made during the transition from 7-speed (126 mm) to 8+-speed (130 mm). It came with a 126 mm 7-speed hub and was later upgraded to a 130 mm 8-speed wheel and both wheels fit easily so double-width spacing has an honorable history.
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Old 04-03-15, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider
. . .

Back in the early '90's I bought an aluminum frame Trek 1420 that was spaced 128 mm as it was made during the transition from 7-speed (126 mm) to 8+-speed (130 mm). It came with a 126 mm 7-speed hub and was later upgraded to a 130 mm 8-speed wheel and both wheels fit easily so double-width spacing has an honorable history.
I have 2 bridgestones like that (an RB-1 and an XO-2). Both are spaced at 128 mm rear. Total non-issue going from 126 mm to a 130 mm rear wheel.

There are a number of decent reasons why one might not want a steel bike but fear of rusting isn't one of them. Steel bikes last a heck of a long time if taken care of properly.
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Old 04-03-15, 08:45 AM
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I will die sooner than my steel steed will rust to pieces.
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Old 04-03-15, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Lonesome rider
Bad idea. You can cold set steel frame, however it's a PITA to get decent result. For example, you have to buy or have to DIY measuring gauge to check if chainstays were set to exactly +2.5 mm from each side. +2.4 and +2.6 is a recipe for disaster. Would you be THAT accurate? If no one forces you to do that sort of conversion, better either to buy new frame with 135 mm spacing or 130 mm hub. They do exist.

It is impossible to cold set aluminum and carbon frames.
Total Bull!
It's unlikely a NEW bike is within 0.1mm.
That's .003937"!

Last edited by Bill Kapaun; 04-03-15 at 09:17 AM.
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Old 04-03-15, 09:05 AM
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I don't know how much spring there is in your aluminum or carbon frame. If you can jam it in, it'll work (for a while). Flat tires will always be a PITA because you'll need an extra hand to spread the frame, hold the frame, and get the wheel back in. There's a possible long-term problem, in that the dropouts will always be slightly sprung. I had a bike break just in front of the dropouts, which the mechanic said was caused by running a 135 wheel in a 130 mm frame; the torsion on the dropouts eventually fatigued the frame until it broke.
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Old 04-03-15, 09:10 AM
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Bill Kapaun, I'm impressed by your ability to use calculator to convert in inches what industry used to make in metrics for decades. Please, set font size #7 , re-write the quote in CAPS and don't forget to use underline. No one hears you otherwise.

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Old 04-03-15, 09:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Lonesome rider
Bill Kapaun, I'm impressed by your ability to use calculator to convert in inches what industry used to make in metrics for decades. Please, set font size #7 , re-write the quote in CAPS and don't forget to use underline. No one hears you otherwise.
Since you only used 2 scoops of BS, I only needed 2 tools to point them out.
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Old 04-03-15, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Lonesome rider
Bad idea. You can cold set steel frame, however it's a PITA to get decent result. For example, you have to buy or have to DIY measuring gauge to check if chainstays were set to exactly +2.5 mm from each side. +2.4 and +2.6 is a recipe for disaster. Would you be THAT accurate?
Umm, no. Show me a frame that is spaced accurately to 0.1mm. Do you really know how small of a distance that is?
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Old 04-03-15, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun
Total Bull!
It's unlikely a NEW bike is within 0.1mm.
That's .003937"!
Last year I had a local frame builder cold-set a 1983 MTB from 126 to 135 and he commented that the rear end was now straighter than most bikes coming from the factory, so this isn't hard to believe.
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Old 04-03-15, 11:27 AM
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i like machining down the lock nut idea. how do I do that?

there are about 2 mm of material that i can file off on each side, but that would smooth out the locknut, which has the grooves in it to hold the wheel in place.
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Old 04-03-15, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by spectastic
i like machining down the lock nut idea. how do I do that?

there are about 2 mm of material that i can file off on each side, but that would smooth out the locknut, which has the grooves in it to hold the wheel in place.
I would suggest not filing/machining your present locknut, but to purchase new ones, and file those down if required.

I would take an old axle, red thread locker a nut in place so that they are 2.5mm (or what ever your final thickness is going to be) from the end. Let it cure for a day. Then thread the nut your want to thin down on the end. Paint the end of the axle with a Sharpie or finger nail polish or ___. Then use a sander to reduce the thickness - warning will get HOT - until the Sharpie starts showing scratches.

This way if you ever want to go back, you'll have the original lock nuts, and if you screw on or more up, you'll have more to get your process right.
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Old 04-03-15, 01:58 PM
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The last time I messed with a 135 hub (hmm, time to repack THOSE bearings!), there was a spacer on the left side. You could replace that with a 5 mm smaller spacer, or leave it out, and re-dish the wheel, if that's an option on this IGH.
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Old 04-03-15, 02:18 PM
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isn't aluminum prone to rust?
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Old 04-03-15, 02:34 PM
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isn't aluminum prone to rust?
You use the term Corrode, then Rust is something Iron Alloys do. non ferrous Materials suffer Corrosion.

Aluminum Corrodes .
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Old 04-03-15, 03:28 PM
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corrodes in the sense of redox in rain water and sweat? I'll take that over rust any day

anyway, the non drive side lock nut is 10 mm, and the drive side lock nut is 5 mm. I'm sure I can find a 5 mm lock nut somewhere to put on the non drive side. The only problem is I already bought the spokes. My gut tells me 5 mm axle displacement won't affect anything radially. Also, the rim will be more shifted toward the drive side than before, but still better than a derailleur system.
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Old 04-03-15, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by spectastic
anyway, the non drive side lock nut is 10 mm, and the drive side lock nut is 5 mm. I'm sure I can find a 5 mm lock nut somewhere to put on the non drive side. The only problem is I already bought the spokes. My gut tells me 5 mm axle displacement won't affect anything radially. Also, the rim will be more shifted toward the drive side than before, but still better than a derailleur system.
You're correct that a 5mm change in O.L.D. will not screw up your spoke length, unless you happened to be right on the edge of the cliff already which not a good place to be regardless.
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Old 04-03-15, 06:58 PM
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I came up with about 1/4mm for a 2 cross.
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