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Patch kit life span

Old 04-06-15, 02:36 PM
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Patch kit life span

Wasn't sure if I should post this here or in the General Cycling forum, but I figured since it deals with fixing a flat, Mechanics it is.

Anyhoo, was wondering if there is an average life span for a tube patch kit? I ask because the kit I have in my saddle bag has been there since Autumn of 2013. Was lucky enough not to have any flats last year while riding, and none so far this year. However, now that the weather is getting warmer and I'll be out on the bike more often, I don't want to take the chance of getting a flat and having the patch fail.

So, should I ride out to my LBS tomorrow (weather permitting) and get a new kit? What say thee?

Thanks in advance for any comments, tips, suggestions, etc., etc.

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Old 04-06-15, 02:52 PM
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, How long you talking about 5 years or Less ?.


Un pierced the metal Foil tubes should be fine, for a couple years

Bring a New Tube with you swap it in . I'd do the actual Patching at home , more comfortable there

I like the save up a few Punctured Inner tube jobs to do at once, then the Tube of self- vulcanizing fluid Is just opened Once and used Up.


BITD Sew up tire riders did the same .. had a 1 day patching and re sewing session for a Bunch of Tires.

Last edited by fietsbob; 04-06-15 at 02:58 PM.
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Old 04-06-15, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
How long you talking about, 5 years or Less?


Un pierced the metal Foil tubes should be fine, for a couple years
Yes. I bought the current patch kit in either late September or early October 2013.
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Old 04-06-15, 02:56 PM
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Usually the only issue is the glue, but if has never been opened it's probably still good.
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Old 04-06-15, 02:58 PM
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I would recommend carrying one or two spare tubes in addition to the patch kit. Flats are bad enough without trying to patch a tube on the side of the road. If you have a flat, change the tube and patch the tube at home.
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Old 04-06-15, 03:41 PM
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I found a 2 year old sealed metal tube of glue be totally empty when pierced (Rema Tip Top). I always carry a tube and a relatively new patch kit. I keep the old old unused patches, which seem to age just fine. Maybe I'll buy some new glue, but I usually don't need it before it dries out. Therefore, I just buy several cheap mini patch kits every couple of years.
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Old 04-06-15, 05:01 PM
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I buy the cement at the auto parts store if a tube drys out. They sell just the glue and usually cheaper - kits too. I have an 8 oz ca n of cement I use at home rather than my on bike kits
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Old 04-06-15, 05:13 PM
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The family fleet is unusually flat prone, I frequently run out of patches before the glue dries up. In my experience Rema patches can last several years with no ill effects and the same applies to sealed glue tubes.
I carry a spare tube and glueless patches (JIC) on the bike and save the Rema kits for shop use after the ride.
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Old 04-06-15, 09:12 PM
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I just opened a four or five year old sealed tube of glue in an old patch kit, and it worked just fine. In fact, two of the tubes I patched are currently running on my commuter bike.
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Old 04-07-15, 07:16 AM
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Thanks for all of the replies. I appreciate the information.

Decided to open up the tube of glue and it seems to be okay.

I like the idea of carrying an extra tube and using it in the event of a flat and fixing the flatted tube at home. That would get me back on the road / trail quicker.

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Old 04-07-15, 10:12 AM
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When I use some glue, I then aim the tube upwards and gently squeeze until glue is about to come out (usually by rolling up the bottom of the tube). Then, recap securely. This minimizes the air in the tube, which I think extends the usable life of the tube of glue. At least that is my experience.

My on-bike kit contains peel-n-stick patches. They do fine to get me home, then I peel them off and do a proper glued repair. This is in case the spare tube (also in my kit) fails for some reason.

I also wear a belt and suspenders.
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Old 04-07-15, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by IndianaRecRider View Post
I like the idea of carrying an extra tube and using it in the event of a flat and fixing the flatted tube at home. That would get me back on the road / trail quicker.

I think it's what a great number of experienced cyclists do, at least those of us who fix our own flats.
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Old 04-07-15, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I think it's what a great number of experienced cyclists do, at least those of us who fix our own flats.
I have seldom patched inner tubes while out on the road and always carry spare inner tubes. I learned this the hard way as a novice cyclist when my inner tube punctured right next to the valve and there was no possible way to repair it. Patch kits are slow to use and don't always work
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Old 04-07-15, 07:40 PM
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I have had the experience with an old patch kit when I pierced the glue it was dry, the kit was quite old. now I always get a new patch kit each year. When I buy items online, I get patch kits or other small items to top off the order to get free shipping.

When riding I normally carry a spare tube and a patch kit for catastrophic events.
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Old 04-07-15, 09:28 PM
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
I buy the cement at the auto parts store if a tube drys out. They sell just the glue and usually cheaper - kits too. I have an 8 oz ca n of cement I use at home rather than my on bike kits
This ^.

O'Reilly Auto Parts carries Quik Seal self-vulcanizing cement, which is the same type of glue that's used in the Rema Tip Top patch kits. A one ounce (28 g) tube (the equivalent of more than 5 patch kits worth of glue (those small tubes are only 5 grams worth) costs $3, whereas an 8 ounce can costs about $10.
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