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over or under-tighening rear wheel axel...

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over or under-tighening rear wheel axel...

Old 04-11-15, 01:54 PM
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over or under-tighening rear wheel axel...

Not sure of what the exact terms are, but I was taking off the rear wheel trying to find some wobble, and since I don't know what I'm doing, I tightened the two inner nuts (not the nuts that hold the wheel on the bike, but the next ones in, that touch the inside of the frame on each side) ...which seemed to severely slow down the turning of the wheel. So I loosened the again and think it is ok now, but it made me wonder if there is any way to know how loose or tight those should be?
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Old 04-11-15, 02:06 PM
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I should add that this is NOT a quick-release axel...just a normal nut on each side holds the wheel on....

....AND, the original reason I messed with it has not been fixed...I noise when I pedal, but not when coasting...I believe it's the back wheel (I hear the plastic part that is between the gears and the spokes)...I checked it and I can wiggle the cassette independent of the wheel...is this normal on a freehub?
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Old 04-11-15, 02:18 PM
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Cone Adjustment
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Old 04-11-15, 02:30 PM
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OK, you tightened the locknuts that lock in the bearing (cone) adjustment. The link above may help, or simply search cone adjustment on the net where you'll find plenty of tutorials.

Unfortunately, you usually need a special thin "cone" wrench to complete the job because you have to hold the cone while you lock the locknut against it.

Once the cones are adjusted, they're left alone, and the wheel is placed in the frame's slots and tightened by the outer axle nuts which press the frame against the locknut face.

If there's a bicycle co-op nearby, they'll help you with the adjustment, saving you some money, or you can let a bike shop fix it (shouldn't cost much at all), or you can buy a pair of cone wrenches and be equipped to service the hubs in the future.
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Old 04-11-15, 07:01 PM
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With a nutted axle when one tightens the outer nuts (the axle nuts, that hold the wheel in the frame) there is a chance that the axle will spin a bit with the nut's being rotated by the wrench. If the locknut either side of the axle doesn't also rotate with the axle that locknut and the associated cone can/will move on the axle. Either tightening up the bearing adjustment or loosening it. This is why when adjusting the bearings the locknuts and the cones need to be fairly tight against each other (and a correct bearing setting is only valid after this locknut and cone tightening). Also when tightening the outer axle nuts I will only rotate one side enough to see the axle barely start to turn then stop and do the other side the same. I will continue alternating the sides until both are fully tight. Done correctly the axle hasn't spun at all during this process so there's no chance of effecting the bearing adjustment. Then I'll go back and be able to fully loosen one side to best align the wheel within the frame and fully retighten that side. The other side's remaining tight will act as a vice to hold the axle from rotating during this alignment positioning. Andy.
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