Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Removing Chain Ring bolts

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Removing Chain Ring bolts

Old 05-09-15, 01:41 PM
  #1  
dweenk 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
dweenk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,476

Bikes: 1971 Fuji Finest, Royale, S-10-S, 1976 Motobecane Mirage, 1989 Trek 330, 1100, 1970 Raleigh Sport, and more

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 706 Post(s)
Liked 97 Times in 71 Posts
Removing Chain Ring bolts

I bought a Raleigh Olympian that had spent some considerable time near the sea. Everything cleaned up well, but now I am trying to separate the chain rings. I soaked them with Liquid Wrench, waited a day and failed. I soaked them with PB Blaster, waited a day and failed.

At this point I am open to advice from anyone.
dweenk is offline  
Old 05-09-15, 01:56 PM
  #2  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Chainring bolt sets are cheap enough to sacrifice. Plus you wouldn't want to reuse them with corrosion damage or rounded out hex heads.

The OD is 10mm, and the thread inside 8mm, so drill them out with anything in between, or a 5/16" since it's close enough. You can drill in slightly, and once through about 3mm or so, the front fact will pop off. Or you can drill from the back, where it'll be easier to follow the round vs. hex hole. All in all this is about a 5 minute job if you have a power drill.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 05-09-15, 02:01 PM
  #3  
dsbrantjr
Senior Member
 
dsbrantjr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Roswell, GA
Posts: 7,410

Bikes: '93 Trek 750, '92 Schwinn Crisscross, '93 Mongoose Alta

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1097 Post(s)
Liked 484 Times in 352 Posts
Right tool for the job: https://www.parktool.com/product/chai...t-wrench-cnw-2
dsbrantjr is offline  
Old 05-09-15, 02:34 PM
  #4  
Matariki
Not quite there yet
 
Matariki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Monkey Bottom, NC
Posts: 1,000

Bikes: A bunch of old steel bikes + an ICE trike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I struggle with chainring bolts frequently. One of these days, I will buy one of these:

Amazon.com : Var Combined Tool for Chainring Bolts : Bike Chainrings And Accessories : Sports & Outdoors

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
41uXVJv0imL._SX300_.jpg (12.5 KB, 17 views)
Matariki is offline  
Old 05-09-15, 04:37 PM
  #5  
Bob Pringle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Ormond Beach, FL
Posts: 233

Bikes: 2005 Specialized Roubaix Elite

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That Park tool is possibly the most frustrating tool I own!
Bob Pringle is offline  
Old 05-09-15, 04:47 PM
  #6  
on the path
Señor Blues
 
on the path's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: upstate NY
Posts: 1,598

Bikes: Cannondale CAAD 10, Breezer Venturi Custom Build, IRO Singlespeed

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 127 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Bob Pringle View Post
That Park tool is possibly the most frustrating tool I own!
It has been called the Worst Tool In The World. I have one too, and I shudder to think of the next time I have to use it..
on the path is offline  
Old 05-09-15, 05:12 PM
  #7  
JonathanGennick 
Senior Member
 
JonathanGennick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Munising, Michigan, USA
Posts: 4,130

Bikes: Priority 600, Priority Continuum, Devinci Dexter

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 53 Times in 35 Posts
Originally Posted by Bob Pringle View Post
That Park tool is possibly the most frustrating tool I own!
Word! I detest that thing.

Now that VAR-brand tool, that one looks fantastic. Wonder if it would span around my bash guards.
JonathanGennick is offline  
Old 05-09-15, 05:56 PM
  #8  
cale
Senior Member
 
cale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,250

Bikes: Kuota Ksano. Litespeed T5 gravel - brilliant!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I think I've held a cone wrench against those in the past. It's been a long time since I wore out a chainring.
cale is offline  
Old 05-10-15, 11:42 AM
  #9  
Rubato
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Seattle
Posts: 246

Bikes: 91 Trek franken '81 Schwinn Voyager

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JonathanGennick View Post
Word! I detest that thing.

Now that VAR-brand tool, that one looks fantastic. Wonder if it would span around my bash guards.
The VAR is nicer to use than the Park by a long shot but I don't think it's as "beefy" as one would assume.... I've had good luck grinding the tip of an old, large, screwdriver to a tight fit.
Rubato is offline  
Old 05-10-15, 11:52 AM
  #10  
dweenk 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
dweenk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,476

Bikes: 1971 Fuji Finest, Royale, S-10-S, 1976 Motobecane Mirage, 1989 Trek 330, 1100, 1970 Raleigh Sport, and more

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 706 Post(s)
Liked 97 Times in 71 Posts
I bought the Park tool, and I must agree with those who said that it is terrible. I've always used a coin as my wrench in the past, but these fasteners are bonded by rust. I was trying to avoid drilling them out, but that looks like the only option. Thanks for your input.
dweenk is offline  
Old 05-10-15, 12:15 PM
  #11  
Eric S.
Senior Member
 
Eric S.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 873

Bikes: '04 LeMond Buenos Aires, '82 Bianchi Nuova Racing, De Rosa SLX, Bridgestone MB-1, Guerciotti TSX, Torpado Aelle, LeMond Tourmalet 853, Bridgestone Radac

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 74 Post(s)
Liked 26 Times in 22 Posts
Drill 'em out and replace with Truvativ bolts. One side is 5mm and the other is 6mm. Life is much easier with these.

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
TRUVATIVE.jpg (18.4 KB, 9 views)
Eric S. is offline  
Old 05-10-15, 04:28 PM
  #12  
ramzilla
Senior Member
 
ramzilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Fernandina Beach FL
Posts: 3,192

Bikes: Vintage Japanese Bicycles, Tange, Ishiwata, Kuwahara

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 594 Post(s)
Liked 187 Times in 148 Posts
Make sure to get a brand new high quality drill bit. Dip the tip of the bit in some oil before drilling. I use automatic transmission fluid or hydraulic oil for drilling.
ramzilla is offline  
Old 05-10-15, 05:32 PM
  #13  
reptilezs
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: boston, ma
Posts: 2,896
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
drill it out or use an impact wrench
reptilezs is offline  
Old 05-10-15, 07:13 PM
  #14  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 15 Posts
We've gone full circle. See post no.2 for suggestions on the drill size to use. As I posted back then, it's a simple straightforward 5 minute job with no serious complications.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 05-12-15, 09:57 AM
  #15  
Kimmo 
bike whisperer
 
Kimmo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Melbourne, Oz
Posts: 8,565

Bikes: https://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=152015&p=1404231

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 915 Post(s)
Liked 258 Times in 192 Posts
Originally Posted by Matariki View Post
I struggle with chainring bolts frequently. One of these days, I will buy one of these:

Amazon.com : Var Combined Tool for Chainring Bolts : Bike Chainrings And Accessories : Sports & Outdoors

For the price of one of those, you can get quite a few sets of 5/6mm chainring bolts...

Nice tool, but I'd rather rid the planet of those rubbish slotted nuts.
Kimmo is offline  
Old 05-12-15, 10:21 AM
  #16  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 15 Posts
I rarely have issues with having to hold the slotted bolts. Most of the time, a bit of thumb pressure is all that's needed. If I need to hold them I use a modified screwdriver. They also make screwdriver style tools for this job, which IMO are easier to use than the flat tools.

One trick which makes holding the nut totally unnecessary, is to apply course lapping compound (or CF assembly paste) under the head. This binds the nut side to the inner ring so it won't turn easily, then use oil on the threads. I used to do this for the track, where chainring changes for the team were a regular occurrence (sometimes more than once a night on the same bike) and it made for fast one tool changes.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 05-13-15, 04:54 PM
  #17  
dweenk 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
dweenk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,476

Bikes: 1971 Fuji Finest, Royale, S-10-S, 1976 Motobecane Mirage, 1989 Trek 330, 1100, 1970 Raleigh Sport, and more

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 706 Post(s)
Liked 97 Times in 71 Posts
Well the chain rings are free. I had to drill them out - never underestimate the power of salt air to fuse steel parts (even plated parts).

As FBinNY said, it takes about 5 minutes. Now I have to clean up the badly oxidized crank arm, but that's a piece of cake.
dweenk is offline  
Old 05-14-15, 03:37 PM
  #18  
snowman40
Senior Member
 
snowman40's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 1,173

Bikes: Fuji

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
How appropriate, I think mine are starting to fail for the same reason. I sheared one last night at the end of my ride, thought maybe I had bent a chainring, which is still a possibility since I finished not really knowing the problem fully.

Now for the mechanic question, If one chainring bolt fails, I should replace them all, correct? My crank arm covers one of them, how can I remove that to replace it? I'm hoping it is something I can do without spending hundreds on tools (or taking into a shop), but at the moment it doesn't appear that way. If a picture is needed, I can post one when I get home just let me know.
snowman40 is offline  
Old 05-14-15, 04:40 PM
  #19  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by snowman40 View Post
How appropriate, I think mine are starting to fail for the same reason. I sheared one last night at the end of my ride, thought maybe I had bent a chainring, which is still a possibility since I finished not really knowing the problem fully.

Now for the mechanic question, If one chainring bolt fails, I should replace them all, correct? My crank arm covers one of them, how can I remove that to replace it? I'm hoping it is something I can do without spending hundreds on tools (or taking into a shop), but at the moment it doesn't appear that way. If a picture is needed, I can post one when I get home just let me know.
What reason is that. Corrosion rarely causes the bolts to fail, just become impossible to remove. Other than that, they'll stay there forever, and most likely do a better job not getting loose than newly installed ones.

IMO- I can't see any reason to replace all because one failed. You do save by buying a set, but that doesn't mean you have to use them all together.

If you have a "blind" bolt, it might be bolted to the crank itself and will be different from the other 4. This is a plain stepped bolt, and is removed from the left. Don't lose or damage it because it's often as expensive as a complete set of 5 normal ones. It sometimes also requires a spacer, so don't drop or lose that when you remove the bolt.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 05-14-15, 05:04 PM
  #20  
snowman40
Senior Member
 
snowman40's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 1,173

Bikes: Fuji

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
What reason is that. Corrosion rarely causes the bolts to fail, just become impossible to remove. Other than that, they'll stay there forever, and most likely do a better job not getting loose than newly installed ones.

IMO- I can't see any reason to replace all because one failed. You do save by buying a set, but that doesn't mean you have to use them all together.

If you have a "blind" bolt, it might be bolted to the crank itself and will be different from the other 4. This is a plain stepped bolt, and is removed from the left. Don't lose or damage it because it's often as expensive as a complete set of 5 normal ones. It sometimes also requires a spacer, so don't drop or lose that when you remove the bolt.
So replace the missing one, and make sure the others are tight and don't lose that stepped bolt. Got it!

I'm not against replacing them, I just don't want to be on a longer ride and only have just made the turn for home and have one or more of the other 3 fail. It is a triple (from what I have seen, the steps aren't too different for double and triples, correct me if I am wrong), so it not like I'd be stranded, but it definitely will not make for a speedy trip home.
snowman40 is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
PatrickGSR94
Bicycle Mechanics
19
04-08-15 01:18 PM
krobinson103
Bicycle Mechanics
4
05-11-14 04:08 PM
SvdSinner
Tandem Cycling
8
07-13-10 07:35 AM
bmt074
Commuting
9
06-02-10 11:30 AM
erbfarm
Bicycle Mechanics
8
03-22-10 11:44 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.