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Bdop 24/28 spoke tension needed?

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Bdop 24/28 spoke tension needed?

Old 05-10-15, 05:06 PM
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mooder
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Bdop 24/28 spoke tension needed?

Hello,

I just got the wheelset. I wonder what tension I should use on the spoke? The front are 1.8 mm sapim race (radial). I haven't touched the rear wheel yet (2x laced). I am 65-67 kg (65 recently).
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Old 05-10-15, 07:01 PM
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Not knowing ANY specifics except spoke gauge and count, I'll venture in with a starting point.

Front, about 65-75kgf, rear roughly 70kgf left and whatever the right needs for proper dish.

Those are VERY rough numbers, but probably well within the ballpark. I've never used formulas or high order math to calculate spoke tension. In fact, tension numbers have never (over almost 50 years) been my primary focus. My goal has always been to have tension high enough that the spokes are in the working spring range at all times, plus a bit of margin for error. I gauge tension by gauging wheel deflection, seeing how far over I can push a rim before offside spokes go slack. That gives me a sense of how that wheel will handle the every day stresses it'll be subjected to.

But all this begs a question. You bought wheels, why are you trying to re-engineer them?
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Old 05-10-15, 07:57 PM
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I was expecting to find some instructions with the package but nope
Front spoke length: 279mm radial lacing.
Rear: nds 282 & ds 278 x2 cross

60-70 kgf is a bit in the low side IMO. My r500 shimano is at ~100-110 kgf.
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Old 05-10-15, 08:23 PM
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Originally Posted by mooder View Post
I was expecting to find some instructions with the package but nope
Front spoke length: 279mm radial lacing.
Rear: nds 282 & ds 278 x2 cross

60-70 kgf is a bit in the low side IMO. My r500 shimano is at ~100-110 kgf.
My wheels often have lower tension than is trendy today. There's a myth that more tension is better, and most is best, but there's no truth to that. You need enough tension to keep spokes in the working spring range, someplace near 85% of the yield at max. That value is a function of the spoke gauge, and for 1.8mm spokes will be about 20% lower than it would be with 2.0mm.

In any case, feel free to go higher, but the front doesn't need or benefit from it, and if you go beyond 70kgf or so on the left rear, you'll be pushing beyond 130kgf on the right.

I'm not invested in these wheels. You asked for advice, and I gave you my considered estimate, as best I could without having the wheels in my hand. Consider it for what it is, and feel free to disregard if you prefer.

OTOH- it still begs the question of why you think that whatever tension they were built to is wrong.
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Old 05-10-15, 08:33 PM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
Not knowing ANY specifics except spoke gauge and count, I'll venture in with a starting point.

Front, about 65-75kgf, rear roughly 70kgf left and whatever the right needs for proper dish.

Those are VERY rough numbers, but probably well within the ballpark. I've never used formulas or high order math to calculate spoke tension. In fact, tension numbers have never (over almost 50 years) been my primary focus. My goal has always been to have tension high enough that the spokes are in the working spring range at all times, plus a bit of margin for error. I gauge tension by gauging wheel deflection, seeing how far over I can push a rim before offside spokes go slack. That gives me a sense of how that wheel will handle the every day stresses it'll be subjected to.

But all this begs a question. You bought wheels, why are you trying to re-engineer them?
I'll assume you maybe missed the "Bdop" part?

I'll assume that this is a kit, so the wheels aren't already assembled. As I've tossed the thought of ordering Bdop or BHS or xxx wheels too, I would be in the same boat. I could easily see myself overtightening spokes if for no other reason than ignorance.

(shrug)
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Old 05-10-15, 08:47 PM
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Originally Posted by loimpact View Post
I'll assume you maybe missed the "Bdop" part?

I'll assume that this is a kit, so the wheels aren't already assembled. As I've tossed the thought of ordering Bdop or BHS or xxx wheels too, I would be in the same boat. I could easily see myself overtightening spokes if for no other reason than ignorance.

(shrug)
Sorry, since I'm not an online wheel buyer, I assumed that Bdop was just another brand. So that answers my question, and my answer for the OP remains the same, still qualified by not having the rim in my hands.
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Old 05-10-15, 09:10 PM
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Originally Posted by mooder View Post
Hello,

I just got the wheelset. I wonder what tension I should use on the spoke? The front are 1.8 mm sapim race (radial). I haven't touched the rear wheel yet (2x laced). I am 65-67 kg (65 recently).
Well, garsh. Have you considered asking the vendor if they have any advice? Presumably, you were able to communicate with them when you bought the wheelset, and they're a member on this forum, so it's not like it would be hard. Maybe, just maybe, they'd have some ideas.
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Old 05-10-15, 09:51 PM
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I built this kit last fall (the 20/24 version). I emailed Bdop to ask what tensions and they responded promptly. Don't remember what they said, though. I am riding those wheels now and am quite pleased with them.
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Old 05-11-15, 12:23 AM
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Well howdy, y'all.

Thought I'd try that out...

This is another topic that can become hotly debated. For a rider of your size I would shoot for around 95~100kgf on the front and 110~115kgf on the RR drive side. The RR NDS spokes will work themselves out.

These are based on recommendations from Sapim. The rims are fine with that, and more. The hubs don't have a limit (at least not one that has ever come up in 7+ years).

I would suggest building the wheels, installing tire/tube and going for a ride or two. After that I would get a spoke wrench on them one more time for good measure. After that, they should be set and just require a little love every now and then when you are going over the rest of the bike doing regular maintenance.

These kits are designed to be pretty straight forward to assemble, even for a first timer, but they do require you to do a bit of homework first to familiarize yourself with general wheel building. If you've built wheel before then these should fall together very easily.

Good luck with the build!

If you have any questions contact me at: sales@bdopcycling.com and we'll get you sorted.
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Old 05-11-15, 08:02 AM
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Thanks I will try this out!
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Old 05-11-15, 09:12 AM
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I built a set last September 24/28 had about 23 on my park tension gage seem to be around 120-125 conversion about 100 on front. Trued great have 3300 miles never have touched them once roll true. I think I got about 73 on NDS. I weight 175 6"2
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