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Giant Roam 3 Peddle Help!!!!

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Giant Roam 3 Peddle Help!!!!

Old 05-13-15, 08:15 PM
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Lukie
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Giant Roam 3 Peddle Help!!!!

Hey guys,

Just got myself a Roam 3 bike two weeks ago and the "peddle stem/bar"is coming loose. Being a newbie, I don't know the name for this part, but its the piece of metal that connects to the pedal (please see pic, exact part coming loose highlighted by red circle). So on my way back home, I was faced with a loosey goosey pedal. I've only been out like 8 times with it so far so that was a bummer to get a malfunction so early..that damn bike shop must not have installed this piece properly. I was wondering what precise tool I could use to tighten this piece. I tried a few tools that were around the house but they wouldn't fit. Also, can you recommend a basic tool set and maintenance kit for these bikes? Thanks for all your help
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Old 05-13-15, 09:43 PM
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Get the bike back to the shop. Riding a loose crank can cause damage. Be sure that it gets covered under warranty.
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Old 05-13-15, 10:08 PM
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+1

A loose crank arm (the part whose name you're struggling with) is one of those "a stitch in time saves nine" items. It's an easy fix now, but will become trash if you continue to ride on it.

BTW - here's something for future reference.
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Old 05-13-15, 10:26 PM
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Oh gee, I had no idea it was this bad, thought is was a diy tighten a bolt kind of job. I will go to the store this week, before riding. Hope I didn't cause any damage riding it back. Thanks for the advice and the diagram.....what kind of tools do you guys have on hand for quickie bike jobs though?
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Old 05-13-15, 10:50 PM
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[QUOTE=Lukie;17803613]Oh gee, I had no idea it was this bad, thought is was a diy tighten a bolt kind of job. I will go to the store this week, before riding. Hope I didn't cause any damage riding it back. Thanks for the advice and the diagram.....what kind of tools do you guys have on hand for quickie bike jobs though?[/QUOTE]

A well maintained bike should need little in on road service excepting what can happen due to incidents. So flat tire stuff, bike fall down stuff, debatable chain stuff. For me this includes the wrenches that cover the cables, bar/stem, seat/post and spokes. When loaded touring for days I'll add crank arm bolt stuff, pedal stuff, cassette/freewheel remover (Pocket vice or Stein Mini *******). And the additional parts like spokes, cables, brake pads, chain links and some misc. bolts. Andy.
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Old 05-13-15, 10:59 PM
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[QUOTE=Andrew R Stewart;17803647]
Originally Posted by Lukie View Post
Oh gee, I had no idea it was this bad, thought is was a diy tighten a bolt kind of job. I will go to the store this week, before riding. Hope I didn't cause any damage riding it back. Thanks for the advice and the diagram.....what kind of tools do you guys have on hand for quickie bike jobs though?[/QUOTE]

A well maintained bike should need little in on road service excepting what can happen due to incidents. So flat tire stuff, bike fall down stuff, debatable chain stuff. For me this includes the wrenches that cover the cables, bar/stem, seat/post and spokes. When loaded touring for days I'll add crank arm bolt stuff, pedal stuff, cassette/freewheel remover (Pocket vice or Stein Mini *******). And the additional parts like spokes, cables, brake pads, chain links and some misc. bolts. Andy.
Thanks. So what brand of tools would you recommend most or is each bike so distinct it needs its own specific tools? In your experience what I've experienced with a new bike is definitely abnormal? I'm a pretty husky guy and I do tend to climb a bit on my bike uphill, putting pressure on the pedal, so I thought I contributed to the crank arm coming loose myself.
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Old 05-13-15, 11:09 PM
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This is a different question the what do we have on hand tool wise. This is why I started my first reply with "a well maintained bike". That qualifier means a bike whose crank arm retaining device is properly tightened and kept up with. Outside of some downhill, freestyle/jumping, trials bikes the only time I see crank arms coming loose is when the retaining bolt(S) are not properly tightened on installation and/or not retightened after initial or long term use. Which, BTW, I see often. Andy.
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Old 05-13-15, 11:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
This is a different question the what do we have on hand tool wise. This is why I started my first reply with "a well maintained bike". That qualifier means a bike whose crank arm retaining device is properly tightened and kept up with. Outside of some downhill, freestyle/jumping, trials bikes the only time I see crank arms coming loose is when the retaining bolt(S) are not properly tightened on installation and/or not retightened after initial or long term use. Which, BTW, I see often. Andy.
Thanks for the context...I will get this fixed at the shop asap. But what's the typical tool and size that you use to tighten the crank arm?
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Old 05-14-15, 12:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Lukie View Post
Thanks for the context...I will get this fixed at the shop asap. But what's the typical tool and size that you use to tighten the crank arm?
Really, there are too many different bottom bracket/crankset versions available for there to be a useful answer to that. Square taper, external hexagonal head - maybe a 15/16 mm socket. Square taper, internal hexagonal head - maybe an 8 mm Allen key/tool bit. Shimano HT II, that's something like a 5/6 mm Allen. Then there is ISIS, HT I etc
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Old 05-14-15, 01:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Lukie View Post
Oh gee, I had no idea it was this bad, thought is was a diy tighten a bolt kind of job. I will go to the store this week, before riding. Hope I didn't cause any damage riding it back. Thanks for the advice and the diagram.....what kind of tools do you guys have on hand for quickie bike jobs though?
Depending on where it is loose, it is something that you should be able to tighten at home.

There are a variety of types and styles, and potentially causes of it being loose.

If it is just the crank arm, and if it uses what is called a "square taper" bottom bracket, then try a 14mm socket wrench (thin walled?). Many more modern bikes will use mostly metric Allen wrenches.

The bearings in the bottom bracket can also come loose depending on the type of bottom bracket (meaning both crank arms will wiggle together). These can also be tightened, sometimes using an adjustable wrench, and a pin spanner.
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Old 05-14-15, 01:48 AM
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In answer to your question about tools, a small set of metric allen/hex wrenches will cover 90% of your needs. Any hardware or automotive shop will have them. Or you can buy bike specific wrenches. A quick internet search will turn up lots of choices - or just go to amazon and enter your search. Park Tools are quality, popular and widely available.
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Old 05-14-15, 06:38 AM
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And there's always the classic cotter pinned crank. These usually nreed a hammer to drive the pin tight and a 10 or 11mm wrench to snug up the pin's nut. But as I said a properly tightened crank won't need an on the road service, unless the bike is neglected for a while. Andy.
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Old 05-14-15, 12:20 PM
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Thanks for all your helpful tips, guys. A little update: So I found the right hex key to tighten the crank arm (btw. it's the 8mm hex key for any other Roam owners out there with a similar issue). But lo and behold after tightening it becomes loose/wobbly again after a few seconds of riding. Not good. Guess they don't make them like they used to. I will take it to the shop to have it repaired. Will it likely be a part replacement and if so, which part is the most likely suspect?

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Old 05-14-15, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Lukie View Post
Thanks for all your helpful tips, guys. A little update: So I found the right hex key to tighten the crank arm (btw. it's the its 8mm hex key for any other Roam owners out there with a similar problem). But lo and behold after tightening it becomes loose/wobbly again after a few seconds of riding. Not good. Guess they don't make them anymore like they used to. I will take it to the shop to have it repaired. Will it likely be a part replacement and if so, which part is the most likely suspect?
It is likely that the crank arm will have to be replaced. Incidentally, crank arms are installed by the factory, not the bike shop.
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Old 05-14-15, 12:25 PM
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You can't tighten because you road on it while it was loose.
Read post 2 and 3 again.
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Old 05-14-15, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by trailangel View Post
You can't tighten because you road on it while it was loose.
Read post 2 and 3 again.
Yes, I get it but I had little choice being a 30 minute ride away from home, so I rode it gingerly back. Besides, its the bike store's fault for not installing the crank arm properly that it comes loose in week two of ownership.
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Old 05-14-15, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
It is likely that the crank arm will have to be replaced. Incidentally, crank arms are installed by the factory, not the bike shop.
Oh joy, might as well get another bike.
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Old 05-14-15, 12:33 PM
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Understand you had to ride it. Persue warranty claim where you bought it.
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Old 05-14-15, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Lukie View Post
Oh joy, might as well get another bike.
No reason to get another bike your problem should be fully covered under warranty
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Old 05-14-15, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Lukie View Post
Yes, I get it but I had little choice being a 30 minute ride away from home, so I rode it gingerly back. Besides, its the bike store's fault for not installing the crank arm properly that it comes loose in week two of ownership.

You are correct, except it is generally the Chinese (or lower) factory who tightens it, not the shop. The shop should be aware that this can happen as it is generally occurs on whole production runs of specific models of bike (in my experience), so they should be making sure they are properly torqued before leaving the shop.

Anyhoo, this is generally considered to be covered under warranty. The shop will likely install a new crankarm and give the old one back to Giant and get reimbursed for it.
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Old 05-14-15, 12:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
You are correct, except it is generally the Chinese (or lower) factory who tightens it, not the shop. The shop should be aware that this can happen as it is generally occurs on whole production runs of specific models of bike (in my experience), so they should be making sure they are properly torqued before leaving the shop.

Anyhoo, this is generally considered to be covered under warranty. The shop will likely install a new crankarm and give the old one back to Giant and get reimbursed for it.

Sweet. Thank god I didn't buy this from Canadian Tire or some such large retailer. Hope the store comes through as you say. Thanks again!
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Old 05-14-15, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
No reason to get another bike your problem should be fully covered under warranty

Good to hear. I'll give it another chance and see. Hopefully they repair this in-house and quickly. Like all people though, I just don't want to end up with a lemon.
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Old 05-14-15, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Lukie View Post
Sweet. Thank god I didn't buy this from Canadian Tire or some such large retailer. Hope the store comes through as you say. Thanks again!
There is no reason to think that the store will not take care of things. As one of the biggest bike companies out there, Giant is able to be choosy about the stores that sell their bikes. They don't want their customers to have a bad experience
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Old 05-14-15, 05:52 PM
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The mechanic at the shop said it was damaged but not too badly. Refitted it and made it nice and tight. Took a one hour ride and so far so good. A bit of a digression - how do you make this bike go faster. It feels a bit bulky (because it is) and as a result a tad sluggish. I think tires and pedals would make a difference. If so, what would you recommend for this bike, for my next tire/pedal change? I don't do too much off pavement, mostly paved parks and beaten paths at most. This forum has been amazing helpful so far, thanks!
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Old 05-14-15, 05:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Lukie View Post
...A bit of a digression - how do you make this bike go faster. It feels a bit bulky (because it is) and as a result a tad sluggish. ....
Smooth tread tires at correct pressure would make the biggest difference. Next is riding position (which may be No.1 depending on the degree of change). After that it's all tinkering at the fringes, except for a better engine, and more experienced pilot at the controls.

Fit riders and smart riders are faster, just about regardless of the bike they're on. (for this I define Fit as meaning having a good power to weight ratio)
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