Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

700x-?

Old 04-20-05, 04:54 PM
  #1  
will13476
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Central New York
Posts: 4

Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
700x-?

Hello,
I'm new here and thanks for having me. I've looked around a little and it looks like a really nice site. I have a tire question: I ride a Specialized Sirrus Comp with Mavic CXP21 rims. Tire size is 700X26c. I noticed on my before ride inspection, that my sidewalls are getting cracks from dryrot. So, now I'm in the market for new tires but 700X26c seems a hard size to find. What other sizes will fit this rim? I ride only on paved roads, someone got any tire recommendations? I currently have Specialized Turbo/Armadillo. Thank you for all your help.
Bill
will13476 is offline  
Old 04-20-05, 05:00 PM
  #2  
supcom
You need a new bike
 
supcom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 5,433
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Look for some 700X25c as a similar size. the 25 is the approximate width. You can go lower if you want a narrower tire or higher for larger so long as you have fork clearance for the tire.

Specialized no longer makes the Turbo Armadillos. Instead, you can use the All-Condition Armadillos. Or, look at some Continental Ultra Gatorskins if you want a lighter tire that has reasonable flat protection.
supcom is offline  
Old 04-20-05, 05:06 PM
  #3  
zonatandem
Senior Member
 
zonatandem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 11,016

Bikes: Custom Zona c/f tandem + Scott Plasma single

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 9 Posts
Usually, depending on your rims, you can fit anything form 700x20 up to as wide as 700x32, if you have enough clearance.
I've been running Maxxis Detonators (NO, they don't explode!) on our tandem with above average results in both tire wear and puncture resistance. They should be great on a single too. They are a folding bead tire and quite easy to install on most rims without using any tire tools.
That's my 25c worth of input (inflation took care of the 2c part)!
zonatandem is offline  
Old 04-20-05, 05:53 PM
  #4  
will13476
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Central New York
Posts: 4

Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks guys for all your good advice. bye the bye, in 700X26c what does the "c" stand for?
Bill
p.s. Also, my bike has the "Body Geometry" seat. Well, my butt still get sore. Has anybody got a seat they like? How about The "Easy Rider" seat?

Last edited by will13476; 04-20-05 at 06:03 PM.
will13476 is offline  
Old 04-20-05, 07:19 PM
  #5  
lmzimmer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 198
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
brooks b17 leather saddles- still the best saddles for long term comfort
lmzimmer is offline  
Old 04-21-05, 08:35 AM
  #6  
KleinRider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: GA
Posts: 537

Bikes: '95 Klein Attitude and Quantum, '92 Trek 830

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by will13476
Thanks guys for all your good advice. bye the bye, in 700X26c what does the "c" stand for?
Bill
p.s. Also, my bike has the "Body Geometry" seat. Well, my butt still get sore. Has anybody got a seat they like? How about The "Easy Rider" seat?
Can't remember what the "c" stands for...

In regards to a seat; a common misconception is that the plusher a seat the more comfortable it is. While if you ride very seldomly, this can be true, most realize after awhile that a firmer seat is more comfortable the more you ride. Do some searching on seats and you'll come up with about a million threads (not really of course ), and you'll get a better feel for what you're looking for. Search in the forum that best describes your style of riding (road vs mountain vs commuting, etc).
KleinRider is offline  
Old 04-21-05, 01:44 PM
  #7  
fsor
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 587
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
There are letter designations applied to rim configurations, but they usually appear in conjunction with the bead diameter (eg. 650B, 700C, 650C etc.) I don't know if that is what the "c" means in this case....I suspect it does ie 700c rim. (yeah a 700 rim is actually a 622 so lets all get really confused!) Tire width is a bit blurry as well.....some mfg. 25 looks like anothers 23 and so forth. If you have time on your hands, go to sheldon browns dissertation.
fsor is offline  
Old 04-21-05, 05:22 PM
  #8  
will13476
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Central New York
Posts: 4

Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for all your good advice. I'll keep you posted.
Bill
will13476 is offline  
Old 04-24-05, 02:01 AM
  #9  
Moochers_Dad
a blend of wit and charm
 
Moochers_Dad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 885

Bikes: Serotta Fierte and a 1989 Centurian Prestige (plus, various others)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by will13476
Thanks guys for all your good advice. bye the bye, in 700X26c what does the "c" stand for?
It's just a tire size designation from long ago. It doesn't stand for anything. There used to be 700a, 700b, and 700d tires also.

Every now and then I see someone selling 700b tubes.
__________________
Moochers_Dad is offline  
Old 04-24-05, 02:06 AM
  #10  
operator
cab horn
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto
Posts: 28,353

Bikes: 1987 Bianchi Campione

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 23 Times in 17 Posts
Don't bother going lower than 700x25. 700x23s have a higher rolling resistance on all but the smoothest of roads (i.e glass).
operator is offline  
Old 04-24-05, 03:05 AM
  #11  
late
Senior Member
 
late's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 8,692
Mentioned: 120 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10468 Post(s)
Liked 611 Times in 466 Posts
https://www.rivbike.com/webalog/tires_tubes/10043.html
late is offline  
Old 02-21-19, 05:30 PM
  #12  
dsbrantjr
Senior Member
 
dsbrantjr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Roswell, GA
Posts: 8,150

Bikes: '93 Trek 750, '92 Schwinn Crisscross, '93 Mongoose Alta

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1369 Post(s)
Liked 905 Times in 630 Posts
The strength in a tire comes from the fabric plies inside, not the outer rubber. Minor surface checking/cracking of tire sidewalls or tread valleys is not necessarily reason to dump them. If the cracking is shallow enough that the fabric does not show I would probably ride them, if a careful inspection did not disclose any other faults.
dsbrantjr is offline  
Old 02-21-19, 06:06 PM
  #13  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,321 Times in 831 Posts
700 is a nominal wheel size category, rheres 600, 650, and so forth ..

A,B, C is a relative combination to arrive at that Diameter ... larger rim - skinnier tire, smaller rim - fatter tire..
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-21-19, 10:37 PM
  #14  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 22,833

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2681 Post(s)
Liked 1,394 Times in 866 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
700 is a nominal wheel size category, rheres 600, 650, and so forth ..

A,B, C is a relative combination to arrive at that Diameter ... larger rim - skinnier tire, smaller rim - fatter tire..
All of which should be considered deprecated now that we have ETRTO designations to use. An ETRTO nn-xxx tire has a width of "nn" and a bead seat diameter of "xxx" where the bead seat diameter is what determines what will fit on your rim, while the "nn" is limited by the clearance on your frame.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 02-21-19, 11:54 PM
  #15  
AnkleWork
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Llano Estacado
Posts: 3,702

Bikes: old clunker

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 102 Times in 80 Posts
Fourteen years.



Let's hope everyone's riding season returns soon.
AnkleWork is offline  
Old 02-22-19, 12:09 AM
  #16  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 26,040
Mentioned: 209 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14383 Post(s)
Liked 2,399 Times in 1,787 Posts
Originally Posted by AnkleWork View Post
Fourteen years.
Some people have lots of patience waiting for an answer to their question.

I wonder if the tread has worn out on those tires yet, or if the OP had just set the bike aside waiting for the right answer to come along...
CliffordK is offline  
Old 02-22-19, 11:14 AM
  #17  
DiabloScott
It's MY mountain
 
DiabloScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Mt.Diablo
Posts: 9,305

Bikes: Klein, Merckx, Trek

Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3018 Post(s)
Liked 1,037 Times in 594 Posts
Originally Posted by AnkleWork View Post
Fourteen years.
Usually these zombies are re-animated by newbs, but Jr. has 6000 posts.
DiabloScott is offline  
Old 02-22-19, 11:29 AM
  #18  
Bigbandito
Circus bear
 
Bigbandito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 75

Bikes: 2018 Fuji Absolute 2.3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by DiabloScott View Post
Usually these zombies are re-animated by newbs, but Jr. has 6000 posts.
He wants to be able to post pictures.
Bigbandito is offline  
Old 02-22-19, 11:40 AM
  #19  
Marcus_Ti 
FLIR Kitten to 0.05C
 
Marcus_Ti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 5,331

Bikes: Roadie: Seven Axiom Race Ti w/Chorus 11s. CX/Adventure: Carver Gravel Grinder w/ Di2

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2347 Post(s)
Liked 399 Times in 250 Posts
Originally Posted by will13476 View Post
Thanks guys for all your good advice. bye the bye, in 700X26c what does the "c" stand for?
Bill
p.s. Also, my bike has the "Body Geometry" seat. Well, my butt still get sore. Has anybody got a seat they like? How about The "Easy Rider" seat?
"C" as to differentiate from the other rim standards like "A", "B", "D", "E" and so on...that are all extinct at this point, but the nomenclature stuck.

TL;DR...the theory back then was that you could have a "700A" and "700C" for example that would have different wheel external rim diameters (ERD), but the circumference of the tire would work out the same by using a larger/smaller size tire. By keeping the circumferece the same, you could in theory use lots of different sized tires/wheels on the same bike without screwing up the toe-overlap or BB height (much).


Which sounds great...until you ruin a tire on the TdF in the middle of nowhere in 1920, and your wheels are 700B, and the only bike parts shop sells 700C tires. Eventually the world settled on 700C as the primary standard.

Last edited by Marcus_Ti; 02-22-19 at 11:44 AM.
Marcus_Ti is offline  
Old 02-22-19, 11:51 AM
  #20  
AnkleWork
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Llano Estacado
Posts: 3,702

Bikes: old clunker

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 684 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 102 Times in 80 Posts
Originally Posted by Marcus_Ti View Post
Originally Posted by will13476 View Post
. . .
"C" as to differentiate from the other rim standards like "A", "B", "D", "E" and so on...that are all extinct at this point, but the nomenclature stuck.

TL;DR...the theory back then was that you could have a "700A" and "700C" for example that would have different wheel external rim diameters (ERD), but the circumference of the tire would work out the same by using a larger/smaller size tire. By keeping the circumferece the same, you could in theory use lots of different sized tires/wheels on the same bike without screwing up the toe-overlap or BB height (much).


Which sounds great...until you ruin a tire on the TdF in the middle of nowhere in 1920, and your wheels are 700B, and the only bike parts shop sells 700C tires. Eventually the world settled on 700C as the primary standard.
Somehow, I don't think will13476 is still reading this forum.
AnkleWork is offline  
Old 02-23-19, 10:48 AM
  #21  
nfmisso
Nigel
 
nfmisso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 2,991

Bikes: 1980s and 1990s steel: CyclePro, Nishiki, Schwinn, SR, Trek........

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 383 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by Marcus_Ti View Post
"C" as to differentiate from the other rim standards like "A", "B", "D", "E" and so on...that are all extinct at this point, but the nomenclature stuck.

TL;DR...the theory back then was that you could have a "700A" and "700C" for example that would have different wheel external rim diameters (ERD), but the circumference of the tire would work out the same by using a larger/smaller size tire. By keeping the circumferece the same, you could in theory use lots of different sized tires/wheels on the same bike without screwing up the toe-overlap or BB height (much).


Which sounds great...until you ruin a tire on the TdF in the middle of nowhere in 1920, and your wheels are 700B, and the only bike parts shop sells 700C tires. Eventually the world settled on 700C as the primary standard.
Originally, all the "700" had an outer tire diameter of 700mm, similar with 650, 600 etc. The A, B, C, D was for different tire widths, and referenced a rim bead seat diameter (BSD) too - all different.

designation width/tire height BSD
700A 30 640
700B 33 635
700C 39 622
700D 56.5 587
650A 30 590
650B 33 584
650C 39 571
650D 56.5 537

The 700c references a 622 BSD rim now, and otherwise had become meaningless.
nfmisso is offline  
Old 02-23-19, 11:21 AM
  #22  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 26,040
Mentioned: 209 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14383 Post(s)
Liked 2,399 Times in 1,787 Posts
Originally Posted by nfmisso View Post
Originally, all the "700" had an outer tire diameter of 700mm, similar with 650, 600 etc. The A, B, C, D was for different tire widths, and referenced a rim bead seat diameter (BSD) too - all different.

designation width/tire height BSD
700A 30 640
700B 33 635
700C 39 622
700D 56.5 587
650A 30 590
650B 33 584
650C 39 571
650D 56.5 537

The 700c references a 622 BSD rim now, and otherwise had become meaningless.
Unfortunately many people confuse the C designation with either cc or cm (both very different).

The 700/650/etc is roughly an outer diameter of the tire in mm (thus initially multiple rim sizes for different tire widths)

650b and 650c are still very commonly used. Maybe even 650A.

However, I presume that 650b would have originally been a narrower tire than 650c, but not is almost universally a wider tire now (and bigger overall diameter).
CliffordK is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Pilot321
Bicycle Mechanics
19
05-30-19 01:36 PM
biketocamp
Road Cycling
23
04-15-17 01:42 PM
B1KE
Road Cycling
25
05-26-15 05:48 PM
Caymem
Road Cycling
4
08-17-11 04:26 PM
uoft23
Bicycle Mechanics
9
08-12-11 09:05 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.