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-   -   good starter tool set? (https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/1031986-good-starter-tool-set.html)

T Stew 09-26-15 06:26 AM

good starter tool set?
 
So I am about to begin a total tear down of a couple '88 schwinn bikes and upgrade with more modern & new stuff. First time doing this kind of work and I am learning everything as I go (as an aside, anyone recommend a good book on bike mechanics?). I realize I am going to be needing to buy some bike specific tools but since I have not done this before I really don't know what all I need yet. Would something like this be good for starters for $50?

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...9L._SX522_.jpg

Amazon has several more choices down to about $40 and a few $100+

I'll likely not be doing this very often, as I have many many hobbies and cycling is just but one. But I am a DIYer with an already well equipped shop so I like to do stuff myself and buy whatever tools I need. If there was a good reason I'd spend more for a better kit but is there? On atleast one of my frame will be total strip down to the frame and reassembly. Is there anything this kit doesn't include that I may need? I currently just have one of those 20-some function alien tools that I carry in my saddlebag. But of course I can't pull bottom brackets or remove freewheels with it. Probably should pick up a stand while I am at it too, was debating if I could fabricate something myself though, maybe even with just some ropes.

LifeCycles 09-26-15 06:48 AM


Originally Posted by T Stew (Post 18195523)
Would something like this be good for starters for $50?

It doesn't look like there is a freewheel tool in the kit. They look similar to but are different that cassette tools. You definitely should get one of those but you can buy that stand alone for not much money. It looks to be a halfway decent kit. Doing hubs can be tricky without an axle vise but I've done it before. Good books are the Park Tool Big Blue Book and Bicycling Magazine's Complete Guide to Bicycle Maintenance and Repair but honestly I have both and if you want to save money you can use YouTube for everything.

Be careful with the bottom bracket tool. It can be tough and you can damage the tool and the component. I recommend using that tool provided and a threaded bolt to hold the tool to the bottom bracket splines by threading the bolt through the tool and into the bottom bracket square taper. Then, since it looks like you are supposed to use that long allen tool to unthread the BB, used a big open ended wrench instead. It wil give you leverage and will put the fulcrum closer to the BB shell making the tool less likely to slip.

Stands make a world of difference but before I had one I would use the carrying rack on my truck and it worked fine.

Larry77 09-26-15 07:01 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I bought the "Bike Hand Tool Kit" on Amazon to have for a start and have replaced and added a few Park Tools for the tools I use the most. I've been really happy with the kit and I like the actual toolbox a lot. It's listed now for $139.

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=479487

Retro Grouch 09-26-15 11:37 AM

This is a frequently asked question. There are 3 common problems with tool kits like that:
1. The omission of tools that you will likely need for your bikes. Freewheel remover, bottom bracket tools and threaded headset wrench come immediately to mind. You'll also need a set of metric end wrenches, a set of metric allen keys, and a GOOD cable cutter.
2. They force you to buy several tools that you won't need for your bikes. I see a bottom bracket tool, cassette tool and chain whip that won't work on your bikes.
3. Some of the tools that are there are kind of cheesy. I'd put that chain breaker and spoke wrench in that category.

I'm a believer in buying just the tools that you need as you find that you need them. I'm also a believer in stepping up a notch from entry level tools.

Homebrew01 09-26-15 12:23 PM


Originally Posted by Retro Grouch (Post 18196028)
This is a frequently asked question. There are 3 common problems with tool kits like that:
1. The omission of tools that you will likely need for your bikes. Freewheel remover, bottom bracket tools and threaded headset wrench come immediately to mind. You'll also need a set of metric end wrenches, a set of metric allen keys, and a GOOD cable cutter.
2. They force you to buy several tools that you won't need for your bikes. I see a bottom bracket tool, cassette tool and chain whip that won't work on your bikes.
3. Some of the tools that are there are kind of cheesy. I'd put that chain breaker and spoke wrench in that category.

I'm a believer in buying just the tools that you need as you find that you need them. I'm also a believer in stepping up a notch from entry level tools.

I agree.

T Stew 09-26-15 08:41 PM


Originally Posted by Retro Grouch (Post 18196028)
This is a frequently asked question. There are 3 common problems with tool kits like that:
1. The omission of tools that you will likely need for your bikes. Freewheel remover, bottom bracket tools and threaded headset wrench come immediately to mind. You'll also need a set of metric end wrenches, a set of metric allen keys, and a GOOD cable cutter.
2. They force you to buy several tools that you won't need for your bikes. I see a bottom bracket tool, cassette tool and chain whip that won't work on your bikes.
3. Some of the tools that are there are kind of cheesy. I'd put that chain breaker and spoke wrench in that category.

I'm a believer in buying just the tools that you need as you find that you need them. I'm also a believer in stepping up a notch from entry level tools.

If its missing tools I'll likely need then I tend to agree that I should probably just pick up what I need, especially since I have all typical tools already, open end wrenches, screwdrivers, allen wrenches, etc. As far as bike specific tools I do already have a cheap spoke wrench and the Alien II tool which has many of these albeit in a pocket size.

I'll be needing all the tools here shortly since I plan on completely stripping one bike down to the bare frame but I just don't know what I'll need yet, so the simplicity of ordering a complete kit was appealing (but only if it was complete!). Some more research is in order I suppose. I'm also putting all modern components on so for those that differ from vintage to current, I suppose I'll need both.

But I suppose its worth asking, is there a more complete toolkit out there? Like what Larry posted? Or one of the even more expensive Park Tool kits? Or is buying the parts individually the way to go without doubt.

Retro Grouch 09-27-15 06:04 AM

3 tools that you'll probably find that you need:

1. Freewheel remover. It's a socket like device that mates with your spin-on freewheel. There are a gazillion different ones and you need to find the right one that fits your bike. There is no adequate work-around for this tool.
2. Threaded headset wrench. It's a thin open end wrench usually 34mm or 36 mm. You really need it to adjust threaded headsets but modern bikes seldom use threaded headsets so the wrenches have fallen out of style.
3. Bottom bracket tools. For old style cup and cone bottom brackets. Again there's lots of different ones and they aren't even the same for the left and right sides. This one, however, you can generally work around if you think about it for awhile.

All three are either on the archaic side and/or specific to particular bikes. That's why I doubt you'll find a package tool kit that contains all the bike specific tools that you'll need to overhaul your bikes.


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