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What's the longest lasting all-weather drivetrain lube?

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What's the longest lasting all-weather drivetrain lube?

Old 10-09-15, 07:50 AM
  #76  
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Are there lubes/grease that you use anywhere else on your bike (not the chain) that you recommend?
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Old 10-09-15, 08:48 AM
  #77  
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As I mentioned above, I used regular thin chain lube (triflow with the straw applicator, then when that ran out, free samples of WD40 chain lube) for derailleur pivots and cable housing. Whenever shifting gets at all sticky, I make sure the derailleurs pivot freely, and squeeze a bunch of drops into the cable housing to make sure the cable slides smoothly.

Inside parts like ball bearings get lubed with grease. For me Park blue stuff (ppl-1)
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Old 10-09-15, 08:55 AM
  #78  
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
If they took dead humans and squeezed them down to a pancake you would have a non invasive, never ending, non polluting source of oil for small stuff like bike lube.
shhhh, but I heard from a friend of a friend of a friend that the very effective chain lube, Soylent-L , has some sort of connection to this, but someone would have to infiltrate the factory to find out more about it.
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Old 10-09-15, 09:49 AM
  #79  
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Originally Posted by gsa103 View Post
To the OP:

A thicker lube like Chain-L will be ideal for your use. Do NOT spray the bike with WD-40 anywhere, ever. Your bike has disc brakes, and WD-40 is the enemy of discs.

After you finish lubing the chain, take a clean shop rag, spray with rubbing alcohol (isopropanol) and gently wipe down the rear brake rotor. This will remove any lube that may have gotten on the disc.
YES, I agree 100%. In my world, WD-40 is only used as a penetrating solvent/lubricant in parts removal, a 1st step degreaser/adhesive remover, or as a surface rust inhibitor. Anything more, is an atrocity (well, I may have left out a few other "good" uses, but that's pretty much it for me).

Makes me wonder how many people have sprayed WD-40 directly on their disks/calipers, because their brakes were "making this annoying squealing sound".

Do you have any suggestions on a super quick method to cover disk brakes during lubing?

[QUOTE=djb;18221170]
Originally Posted by NCSUMike View Post
Wow, thanks for the tips! And 9,000 miles on a chain is pretty darn impressive.
/QUOTE]

After 15,000km on a chain, I would want to see you measure the stretch using a ruler and see how many 16ths it has stretched. You can of course ride as much mileage as you want on a chain, but do realize that at a certain point, you are wearing the cassette and chainrings more than you want, and these bits cost much more to replace than a chain.

If it goes too long, then when you put a new chain on, it will skip on the cassette cogs as they have worn more due to the elongated chain. Same with chainrings.

following the general stretch rule using a ruler or measuring tape will get the most life out of your other bits, which in the end is cheaper than just letting a chain go a really long time.
True, chains are a lot cheaper than sprockets! I'll be checking my own chain at each overhaul for sure.

Originally Posted by djb View Post
your question here made me think of an old trick I used many years ago, so I brought this up in the mechanics forum. Take a peek, there are some good tips, my pipe cleaner one, and others by a guy named cny--good ones about coming up with stuff to put a barrier at points where bearings are, hubs, bottom of headset etc.
The pipecleaner thing would be good for your rear hub cassette area, just cuz you can easily put a section on and off in just a few seconds. The other tips all make sense, just any sort of barrier to gunge will be good.

do you have any interest to learn how to regrease your hubs? Would be good to do after a winter of gritty riding. Or even do before winter to make sure there is lots of grease in your hubs.\

Here is the link to the pipe cleaner trick etc

http://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-me...l#post18221002
Thanks again for starting that thread, very interesting! I'll have to keep pipe cleaners in the back of my mind for more odd jobs and fixes down the road.

I'm definitely going to have to learn how to do my own overhaul-level maintenance. It'd be therapeutic for me as well, as I love anything mechanical. I'll also have to invest in some essential tools, like drivetrain sockets/wrenches, and a chain whip wrench. In the end, it's hard to know whether or not I'll save any money vs. taking it to a LBS for serious maintenance. Time is also a factor as a grad student. For me, taking my bike to an LBS without a proper car rack (again, $$), and driving to and fro, also takes 1 to 1.5 hours, round trip. What would you do if you were in my shoes?
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Old 10-09-15, 09:52 AM
  #80  
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Originally Posted by NCSUMike View Post
YES, I agree 100%. In my world, WD-40 is only used as a penetrating solvent/lubricant in parts removal, a 1st step degreaser/adhesive remover, or as a surface rust inhibitor. Anything more, is an atrocity (well, I may have left out a few other "good" uses, but that's pretty much it for me).

Makes me wonder how many people have sprayed WD-40 directly on their disks/calipers, because their brakes were "making this annoying squealing sound".
WD-40 also produces a line of bicycle lubricants: WD-40 BIKE | A comprehensive line of bicycle care products developed for cyclists and mechanics
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Old 10-09-15, 11:55 AM
  #81  
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Originally Posted by NCSUMike View Post
I'm definitely going to have to learn how to do my own overhaul-level maintenance. It'd be therapeutic for me as well, as I love anything mechanical. I'll also have to invest in some essential tools, like drivetrain sockets/wrenches, and a chain whip wrench. In the end, it's hard to know whether or not I'll save any money vs. taking it to a LBS for serious maintenance. Time is also a factor as a grad student. For me, taking my bike to an LBS without a proper car rack (again, $$), and driving to and fro, also takes 1 to 1.5 hours, round trip. What would you do if you were in my shoes?
when I was in your shoes, I just bought the most inexpensive tools I needed at the time, they still work fine, as I figured in the long run its a lot less money than getting someone else to do the job, and as I was getting into touring, I wanted to know myself how to do stuff, and to know it was done properly, and also just to be more familiar with the mechanics of my bike.

two cone wrenches
chain whip to help remove cassette
doohickey thingee to actually remove cassette
an adjustable wrench or two
some bearing grease

thinks thats pretty much it, I used to do the job myself and then ask my local bike store mechanics to check out my job to see if I did a good job of adjusting the cones and tightening down the locknut.
cone wrenches etc probably cost $50 or a bit more, but if biking is something you will do for years, you'll use them and cone wrenches, chain whip and a cassette tool (shimano) dont really go out of style

check out places like REI or Nashbar for perhaps more economical tools

nearly all my friends have no interest in looking at hubs, just ignore them, but knowing there is a good amount of grease inthem and are properly adjusted (Ive seen new bikes with overtightened cones in hubs, a mid range bike my wife bought a bunch of years ago, figure its done by a machine or people just banging them out) is a real plus if you are interested in the mechanical side of things.

yes, there are a ton of youtube vids probably on loose ball hub regreasing, but its good to get someone to show you the proper adjustment , and to get a real physical feel for what you are doing.

bike co-ops would be a great resource, both for tools and knowledgeable help. Id go over your hubs now if you can at a co-op ,pre winter riding, and then in spring again. It aint rocket science, pretty simple but getting hands on tips from someone face to face would always be nice.

have fun if interested.

I would add that if you ignore your hubs, you risk messing them up , especially wiht winter riding, and that will cost you money. more than buying tools and learning it yourself.
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Old 10-09-15, 01:35 PM
  #82  
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Originally Posted by NCSUMike View Post
Makes me wonder how many people have sprayed WD-40 directly on their disks/calipers, because their brakes were "making this annoying squealing sound".

Do you have any suggestions on a super quick method to cover disk brakes during lubing?
Far too many, its a re-occuring topic on mtbr.

For a quick lube, I wouldn't bother with covering the disc. You might be able to insert some paper in the spokes, but if you're using a thicker lube its not needed. The simplest solution is usually removing the wheel (if using a stand for example).
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Old 10-09-15, 06:34 PM
  #83  
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What's the longest lasting all-weather drivetrain lube?

A clean chain. Take the time to clean it, once in a while, and it will make any lube look good.
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Old 10-09-15, 06:41 PM
  #84  
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Chainsaw oil is okay for use in bike chain?
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Old 10-09-15, 06:50 PM
  #85  
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Originally Posted by bobbyl1966 View Post
Chainsaw oil is okay for use in bike chain?
Yes, as was posted by a number of people on this thread.
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Old 10-09-15, 07:17 PM
  #86  
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i not reaf the posts good thank you for the answer
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Old 10-09-15, 08:10 PM
  #87  
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I'm definitely going to have to learn how to do my own overhaul-level maintenance. It'd be therapeutic for me as well, as I love anything mechanical. I'll also have to invest in some essential tools, like drivetrain sockets/wrenches, and a chain whip wrench. In the end, it's hard to know whether or not I'll save any money vs. taking it to a LBS for serious maintenance. Time is also a factor as a grad student. For me, taking my bike to an LBS without a proper car rack (again, $$), and driving to and fro, also takes 1 to 1.5 hours, round trip. What would you do if you were in my shoes?
Does NCSU have a bike co-op? They would definitely have tools to borrow, and either staff to show you how to do stuff, or classes.

djb gives good advice, I would say only that when it comes to cone wrenches, having to be so thin, cheap is probably worthless. You'll get only a few uses out of them before they're mangled.
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Old 10-09-15, 10:33 PM
  #88  
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Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Does NCSU have a bike co-op? They would definitely have tools to borrow, and either staff to show you how to do stuff, or classes.

djb gives good advice, I would say only that when it comes to cone wrenches, having to be so thin, cheap is probably worthless. You'll get only a few uses out of them before they're mangled.
if they are made out of cardboard or aluminum foil maybe, but my non descript ones I bought 25 years ago have stood up fine, so don't really understand your comment.

They dont get a lot of torque put onto them, really only when you hold one cone tight while with a wrench you undo the lock nut, and then when tighten the lock nut down again afterwards. Since I've had a table vice, I do the fiddly cone adjustment stuff with the wheel vertical on my work bench, then put the wheel horizontally on my vise, with the vise clamped onto the locknut of the side that I dont loosen, then hold cone wrench in place and tighten the lock nut. We're not talking head gasket torques here, and heck, my run of the mill cone wrenches have even survived being used by my wife to take off pedals (why I usually try to remember to hide them under a bunch of other bike stuff so this doesnt happen).
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Old 10-09-15, 10:58 PM
  #89  
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I've been using Boeshield T-9 from the dropper bottle. It seems to be doing its job. After reading all of the praise for Chain-L, I might try it next.
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Old 10-10-15, 07:17 AM
  #90  
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Originally Posted by djb View Post
if they are made out of cardboard or aluminum foil maybe, but my non descript ones I bought 25 years ago have stood up fine, so don't really understand your comment.

They dont get a lot of torque put onto them, really only when you hold one cone tight while with a wrench you undo the lock nut, and then when tighten the lock nut down again afterwards. Since I've had a table vice, I do the fiddly cone adjustment stuff with the wheel vertical on my work bench, then put the wheel horizontally on my vise, with the vise clamped onto the locknut of the side that I dont loosen, then hold cone wrench in place and tighten the lock nut. We're not talking head gasket torques here, and heck, my run of the mill cone wrenches have even survived being used by my wife to take off pedals (why I usually try to remember to hide them under a bunch of other bike stuff so this doesnt happen).
Hmm, maybe you got lucky, maybe your techniques are as gentle as possible, but I know that the cone wrenches that came with my Nashbar Essential kit are Essentially made of tin foil.
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Old 10-10-15, 07:31 AM
  #91  
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I have no idea what brand mine are, I bought them years and years ago like I said, especially at a time when I would have looked for the least expensive ones, but they are solid steel and dont seem that different than the cheaper ones I see at MEC here in Canada, a REI-like store.

Cycling : Maintenance and Repair : Bike Tools : Cone Wrenches - Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC). Free Shipping Available.

$11.75 each now, and probably fairly similar in equivalent money and quality to the ones I bought 25 years ago or more.
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Old 10-10-15, 06:26 PM
  #92  
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Another vote for Chain-L - great stuff!
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Old 10-17-15, 10:00 AM
  #93  
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I tried using paraffin for the first time this season and liked it. I wrote a short article about the experience here.
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Old 10-19-15, 10:18 AM
  #94  
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I'm a boiled whale blubber kind of guy but it's getting harder to find these days.....So mostly it's Mobil 1 and solvent mix .....If I'm bored I'll heat it up and melt in some paraffin to make it less sticky.....It's good for a couple hundred miles or so.....I go through 2-3 chains a year,doesn't matter if I use an extra chain every year.
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Old 10-26-15, 05:23 PM
  #95  
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chainsaw oil is okay for bike chain?
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Old 10-26-15, 05:28 PM
  #96  
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Originally Posted by bobbyl1966 View Post
i not reaf the posts good thank you for the answer
reaf it again?
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Old 10-26-15, 05:59 PM
  #97  
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Originally Posted by bobbyl1966 View Post
chainsaw oil is okay for bike chain?
I have seen more than one person say they used chainsaw oil and it worked fine for them, some thinned it with some kind of solvent that would aid penetration then evaporate.
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Old 10-26-15, 07:16 PM
  #98  
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i found chainsaw oil in one yard sale and i deside to try in my chain.
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