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Reliable 7-speed freewheel?

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Reliable 7-speed freewheel?

Old 10-07-15, 01:11 PM
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philbob57
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Reliable 7-speed freewheel?

I'm about 90% certain that I'll have my bike's rear triangle coldset to 126mm so I can use a 7-spd freewheel. I've just about settled on a Shimano TZ21 (IIRC), 14-28, which give me a pretty close-geared range from under 40 GI - over 100 GI.

Another thread refers to this freewheel as 'low end'. Are there better ones out there? All I see are things by Falcon or Sunrace, and I figure if Shimano puts its name on something, it may be good enough.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 10-07-15, 01:23 PM
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I have that exact freewheel on a couple of bikes and they have been worry free. Not light, but I don't care.
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Old 10-07-15, 01:26 PM
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I had a problem with the spacing on a Shimano TZ-21 14-28 7 speed freewheel - the 5th cog (3rd lowest teeth count) was offset slightly, enough that with an indexed shifter it would not work without a great deal of noise. The other six cogs lined up fine. Thus I could set it up for one cog or six cogs......

It was replaced with a Sunrace 13-28, which worked great.
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Old 10-07-15, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by philbob57 View Post
I'm about 90% certain that I'll have my bike's rear triangle coldset to 126mm so I can use a 7-spd freewheel.
Get it cold set to 128. Then if you decide to go "modern" you can just slip a 130mm wheel in there without any problem.
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Old 10-07-15, 02:30 PM
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Pretty much all freewheels made these days are basic grade or cheap. As there's no OEM business for high end freewheels it's no wonder that none are made by Shimano, SRAM or Campy. But there are still stashes of old but unused stock for the having through EBay and other privet sale offerings. But I wouldn't try too hard. The difference between a basic grade and a high end isn't too much. I've seen Dura Ace and Sachs freewheels have bearing and wobbliness issues before.

Also I'd spread the frame all the way to 130 and just respace the axle's LH side to fit. besides the future forward compatibility you'll have a less dished wheel. Andy.
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Old 10-07-15, 02:34 PM
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when Sachs-Malliard Aris freewheels were made they were very good ..

but SRAM did not want that division when they Bought out Sachs, so ther were tossed over the transom..
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Old 10-07-15, 04:18 PM
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I think new Shimano freewheels are very good, better than most of the old ones.
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Old 10-07-15, 05:52 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
when Sachs-Malliard Aris freewheels were made they were very good ..

but SRAM did not want that division when they Bought out Sachs, so ther were tossed over the transom..
Well, yes and no. The material grade was good and the wear rate also good (but this suffered when they went to 1.8mm thick cog stock). And I do/did like the shift at any point tooth design (meaning the lack of specific shift points around the cogs). But I have seen more then a couple of tight cores which didn't spin well and those which wobbled on more then one hub. IME the best attributes are that one could create custom ranges (keeping the 2mm and 1.8mm cogs separate of each other and their specific bodies) and that they let one run a freewheel in the early days of campy made Sachs brifters. Andy.
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Old 10-07-15, 05:56 PM
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I never left friction shifting so my criteria are not needing hyperglide induced ghost shifting .



The improvement in durability is just not in the business plans

when the gadgeteering is what gets you noticed in the Press.

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Old 10-07-15, 06:08 PM
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Shimano's aren't very glamorous, but they're reliable and last long enough for the price.

If you're going to the effort of cold-setting the frame to 126mm, why not build your next rear wheel around a good used 7-speed cassette hub? They're easy to find cheap, and the cassettes are in strong production by Shimano, SRAM, IRD, and a host of others.
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Old 10-07-15, 06:20 PM
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FB- Not sure how to reply. But here goes.

Agreed that improved durability isn't the future of a business. Although users will be unhappy if they were to find out that less durability were the plan. But that's not why the thinner cog stock was used in later versions of the Sachs freewheels. It was to improve chain noise and smoothen the meshing. Being not a shift gated design any ghost shifting isn't the result of hyperglide (or any other ***glide thingy) but of not trimming the shift lever. User error or shift lever friction creepage.

Also agree that "gadgeteering" gets the press. But at some point a company needs to maintain sales or go out of business. If this company can't convince (marketing) the buyers that their classic/traditional/old ways are better then the new stuff this company suffers.

I'm a pretty big retro grouch. The bike I rode around town for 35 miles today is a steel frame and forked, 9 speed, single pivoted caliper with quill stem thing. But it does have cassetted cartridge bearing hubs, Ergo (although run through a Shift Mate) levered machine. At least it uses 36 spokes per wheel still. In today's world with careful consideration we can pick and choose a lot of specs. Some just won't be around as long in the future. Andy.
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Old 10-07-15, 06:52 PM
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OP - I made the same search you're making and found a few used freewheels that would work. But they didn't have the range I was looking for. I ended up buying the TZ21 for my 1985 Gazelle and have been very pleased with its performance. While it may be a few ounces heavier than some freewheels, it is extremely smooth shifting.
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Old 10-07-15, 07:05 PM
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I just put an HG-37 on a bike to replace the old 6 speed Shimano 600. It shifts fine using a 6 speed derailler and 8 speed Claris brifters. Quality seems to be just fine
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