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Best brakes for high speeds

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Best brakes for high speeds

Old 10-08-15, 09:10 PM
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T6R
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Best brakes for high speeds

hi guys, I have a motorized bicycle. I know this is usually taboo on pedal bike forums, but i'm looking at upgrading my brakes to make it safer. Once the project is complete i'm anticipating top speeds of between 55-65mph. This bike will be for closed courses. I won't ever reach those speeds, but it should accelerate very quickly and i need a set of brakes that i won't have to re-adjust after every corner. Are there any very high end disc break pads that you guys can recommend? Currently i'm running a front disc and rear vbrake on it and i have to re-adjust/replace the vbrake pads every few rides and its pretty much stock right now. So with that said, what would you guys reccomend for high end pads? thanks.
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Old 10-08-15, 09:22 PM
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I suggest that you take your search to motorized fields. Bicycle solutions are focused on far less energy/speed/inertia. Even our events which see these speeds are separated by days of maintenance. However motorcycles/go karts see these efforts far more often. Maybe it's time you move on to mechanisms which mimic your efforts. Andy.
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Old 10-08-15, 10:19 PM
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The key in braking isn't the pads but the "swept area" on the rotor, and it's ability to absorb and/or radiate heat to the surrounding air.

The pads won't make that much difference, except that since the rotor is going to hot, you want to seek out pads with a higher melting point.

In calculating how much brake you need, you need to factor the vehicle weight, and the amount of speed you intend to drop, and how often you'll be braking, or how much time the rotors will have to cool off between braking intervals.

OTOH - you may be in luck. If this is truly a closed course vehicle, the braking needs may be extremely low, mainly some scrubbing of speed as you enter turns, then a final stop after coasting down at the end.

I can't advise on the specifics since I don't know them, but be honest with yourself. If it's a closed course bike, keep it there, or make sure you have adequate bakes for street use.
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Old 10-08-15, 10:34 PM
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It might help by posting specific models of brakes/rims you are actually using...
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Old 10-08-15, 10:48 PM
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OP: Recommend search for e-bikes. Lots of folks chatting about them and they have a good following. Much is available in terms of brakes you could adopt to your bike. In the end it might be easier to just buy one of them there things. You could do worse than starting here;

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss...ke%2Caps%2C157
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Old 10-09-15, 12:18 AM
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Shimano Ice-tech (sp?) seems to be favourably received.
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Old 10-09-15, 04:29 AM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
The key in braking isn't the pads but the "swept area" on the rotor, and it's ability to absorb and/or radiate heat to the surrounding air.
This would imply fitting the largest diameter rotor possible, on both front and rear. Also suggest a two-piston caliper design, which may self-adjust better than the single-piston plus fixed-pad variety. What have you got now?

Something like the Kool-Stop "Sintered brake compound with copper plated back plate" or "Electric bike compound" pads at Kool Stop International - High Performance Bicycle Brake Pads Since 1977 may handle the heat better than organic or semi-metallic pads.
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Old 10-09-15, 03:40 PM
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I have some pretty low end stuff on it right now. I'm not actually even sure what the model of the disc break on it is. it came on an older low end mongoose bike so i was looking to overhaul the entire braking system. I can fit a maximum of a 180mm rotor on the back. At the moment i'm much more concerned about rear stopping power as i am front stopping power. I know most of your stopping power is in the front, but i don't really want to go over my handle bars. my friends and i use an abandoned parking low on the weekends to do our own little race course setup, but we were getting complaints about noise levels from our bikes so we opted to use something a bit quieter. we're currently running 4 stroke motorized bycicles, but we need some more stopping power. had to make some of the corners much wider because they're like driving tanks around a corner. I wanted to overhaul my entire brake setup. I do have to use attachements to get the brake on the rear because i don't have tabs on my frame. with that said, would i be better off using Hydraulic ones?
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Old 10-09-15, 03:57 PM
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Originally Posted by T6R View Post
. . . At the moment i'm much more concerned about rear stopping power as i am front stopping power. I know most of your stopping power is in the front, but i don't really want to go over my handle bars. . .
Considering your usage, there simply is no solution.
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Old 10-09-15, 05:42 PM
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork View Post
Considering your usage, there simply is no solution.
You don't really have to say anything at all if you can't contribute anything to the conversation. Kind of a waste of both my time and your time.
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Old 10-09-15, 06:02 PM
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Perhaps AnkleWork's comment was a bit harsh but I share what I think are his thoughts. You use the lowest end components in the bike industry. You then add far more power and forces then they were ever designed to handle. Then you also reject over 100 years of experience by rejection a front brake. You have had reasonable suggestions from getting better bike industry components to trying the field of motorized options (which is really what you're running). It's not a hard leap to understand why some of us are shaking our heads.

There have been other examples of out of the box Ops and their threads on this forum. Most are met with some skepticism and question. Very few take what we offer and turn out something of results and "value". As a life long LBS guy I can get pretty cynical with some of the plans/requests/questions/wants I get. Prove us wrong please and report back with your improvements and the results you see. Andy.
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Old 10-09-15, 06:49 PM
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So, you have a motorized bicycle and ride it on a closed course (indoors?) in big circles at high speeds over and over again? Sounds like a lot of fun...
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Old 10-09-15, 06:53 PM
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Originally Posted by T6R View Post
You don't really have to say anything at all if you can't contribute anything to the conversation. Kind of a waste of both my time and your time.
Most people consider simple truths to be, as you say, "a waste of time." You have good reason to hate truth.
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Old 10-09-15, 09:23 PM
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You are building a motorcycle, not a bicycle, so you need to use motorcycle components or as close to them as you can get.

I would look at forks and brakes from small motorcycles or scooters, and see if you can adapt those to your machine.

If you are determined to stick with bicycle components, I would try to double up the front discs (one on each fork leg), use the largest diameter and heaviest discs possible, provide extra cooling through air scoops or heat sinks or additional fluid reservoirs.

I would learn how to use the front brake because, frankly, no successful racer relies on the rear brake. Learning to brake is part of learning to race.

I would also start using top quality stuff, not the lowest end components. And I would learn to weld and fabricate.

Finally, you will probably find more concrete suggestions over in the e-bike forum.
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Old 10-09-15, 10:18 PM
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You might try tracking this down: Gatorbrake Eight Piston Hydraulic Disc Brakes with Carbon Fiber Rotors
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Old 10-09-15, 11:17 PM
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With normal off the shelf stuff, something like the Saint brakes from Shimano are probably the best thing you can get right now and fit the biggest rotors your bike can take but...

If you are going to try to reach those speeds, you REALLY need to get comfortable with your front brake, you can use it at 50+ mph without issue as long as you know what you are doing. Road cyclists do it all the time.

You also should look into upgrading the frame to something designed around a disc rear brake.
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Old 10-10-15, 10:28 PM
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Originally Posted by dwmckee View Post
So, you have a motorized bicycle and ride it on a closed course (indoors?) in big circles at high speeds over and over again? Sounds like a lot of fun...
Outdoors, and closed course meaning we're not taking them on the road to race them. We did the same thing with our street bikes but made too much noise. Its not a circle track, its a small track made using cones and the islands built into the parking lot. so lots of left and right turns, straight-aways and lots of tight turns.

In Replay to the comment about road bike riders sing front brakes all the time, i know. I use mine often because the rear brake isn't enough to slow the bike down.
Andrew Stewert, i came to a forum for suggestions on parts that are made for bicycles. I never said i wouldn't take suggestions.

We're all using frames with built in gas tanks because they fit our needs a little more. I did take a look at some of the different parts that were suggested and i'm going to go with a double disc in the front, and the saint brakes look good. i think we will go with those. I don't know a whole lot of the parts that are out there because i am fairly new to building bikes( i built all 6 of them myself since my friends didn't know how to do it) and i wanted some help. I'm a computer nerd, i build high end desktops, and read every hardware article i see. but i've never treated someone who knows less than i do who might have strange ideas with disrespect or outright rude behaviors. some people just don't like things that are different. Thats fine, but you don't have to act like tools.
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Old 10-11-15, 06:55 PM
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Sorry about that. It does sound quite a bit more interesting now that you have elaborated on some details. Gas powered then?
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Old 10-12-15, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by chriskmurray View Post
With normal off the shelf stuff, something like the Saint brakes from Shimano are probably the best thing you can get right now and fit the biggest rotors your bike can take but...

If you are going to try to reach those speeds, you REALLY need to get comfortable with your front brake, you can use it at 50+ mph without issue as long as you know what you are doing. Road cyclists do it all the time.

You also should look into upgrading the frame to something designed around a disc rear brake.
This. Shimano Saint/Zee disc brakes. Designed for downhill usage. 203mm rotors if possible. The brakes will also have good modulation to prevent over-the-bars.
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