Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Hydraulic road disc brakes from the home mechanics perspective?

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Hydraulic road disc brakes from the home mechanics perspective?

Old 02-15-16, 09:34 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 613

Bikes: Niner RLT 9 4 Star, Kona Splice, Nashbar Carbon road bike

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hydraulic road disc brakes from the home mechanics perspective?

I'm in the market for a new "adventure/gravel/light touring bike" and they all come with disc brakes, most options have hydraulic brakes. I do all my own wrenching/tuning/repair. I'm wondering how much of a extra hassle hydraulic road disc brakes would to maintain and repair in the long run. What extra tools would be needed to maintain them?

I have also seen cable actuated hydraulic disc brakes that look like they might be a easier option. Compatible with standard road shifters and brake cable and housing is easily replaceable. Would these or even quality mechanical disc brakes be a better option for the home mechanic?
KonaRider125 is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 09:56 AM
  #2  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,360 Times in 866 Posts
R-T-F-M, first. for the bike and the brakes You Buy.

in addition to the premium latest Gear, There is the TRP Hi Rd Cable to that Hydraulic caliper

and converters that use Hydraulic Hose from a dual Master that goes Under the stem .

Last edited by fietsbob; 02-15-16 at 10:01 AM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 09:58 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 8,688
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1074 Post(s)
Liked 295 Times in 222 Posts
Hydros are a different technology. As such they require different skills, and some different tools. If you have those, working with hydros are perhaps a bit more dribbly and messy than mechanical brakes, but not really outright harder.
I'm betting some years from now, someone who started riding with hydros would be as intimidated by rim brakes as some rim brake imprinted people are with hydros today.

It's true, not all hydros are created equal. With more and more "budget" models becoming available, the number of unsatisfied customers will probably increase. But I've been quite happy with mine.

Mechanical discs follow the same pattern. There is a spread in performance.
But I've seen a lot good said about Avid BB7.
dabac is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 10:29 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Tim_Iowa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Posts: 1,643

Bikes: 1997 Rivendell Road Standard 650b conversion (tourer), 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10 (gravel/tour), 2013 Foundry Auger disc (CX/gravel), 2016 Cannondale Fat CAAD 2 (MTB/winter), 2011 Cannondale Flash 29er Lefty (trail MTB)

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 167 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
You'll want to get a hydraulic bleed kit that is compatible with the brakes you buy, read the manual/tech docs, and you're pretty much set.

Bleeding is required less often than adjusting pads on mechanical disc brakes, but is more messy and a little more time consuming.
Tim_Iowa is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 10:49 AM
  #5  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Central Coast, California
Posts: 613

Bikes: Niner RLT 9 4 Star, Kona Splice, Nashbar Carbon road bike

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for the replies.

Would TRP HY RD brakes be a good option? I'm thinking ease of installing, replacing housing/cable.

TRP

Last edited by KonaRider125; 02-15-16 at 11:36 AM.
KonaRider125 is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 11:01 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
well biked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 7,496
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Liked 166 Times in 91 Posts
If you're using a drop bar/disc brake bike that's a singlespeed or uses shifters that aren't integrated with the brake levers (i.e. bar end shifters, etc) then TRP hylex brakes are absolutely awesome IME. I've got thousands of miles on them, and I rate them as good as really good mtb hydraulics. The TRP HY RD's are a poor substitute if you want hydraulic brakes ( I have experience with those, too), they feel and perform more like a mechanical disc than a hydraulic IMO. If you have a drop bar bike and want/need integrated shifters/brake levers and hydraulic brakes, the stuff from Shimano would be top choice IMO.
well biked is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 11:08 AM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
JonathanGennick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Munising, Michigan, USA
Posts: 4,131

Bikes: Priority 600, Priority Continuum, Devinci Dexter

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 685 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 55 Times in 37 Posts
Originally Posted by KonaRider125
I'm wondering how much of a extra hassle hydraulic road disc brakes would to maintain and repair in the long run.
Maybe I shouldn't speak, because I'm more of a mountain-bike person. Hydros can be a bit more hassle if you're a wrenching enthusiast who is tearing down and building up different sizes and types of frames. I'm always tinkering with bikes and frames, and it's nothing to run new cable and housing when I'm moving mechanical brakes to a different size frame. It's a little more tedious to replace hydro lines.

The first time you bleed brakes can be intimidating. And it can be a little bit annoying that every brand of brake seems to require some different adapter or screw size or something along those lines. And inevitably I have DOT fluid on hand when I want to bleed my mineral brakes, and mineral oil on hand when I want to bleed my DOT brakes.

Once you've bled a few times, you get the hang of it and it's not so bad.
JonathanGennick is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 11:10 AM
  #8  
Stevoo
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: So Cal
Posts: 220

Bikes: Road and mountain tandems, single bikes too.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
All my road bikes and mtn bikes are Shimano hydraulic.
I wrench on all my bikes.
Have owned cable disks before.
I would never go back to cable.
Hydraulic is very easy to maintain. They just work so darn good.
Quite maintenance free really.
Highly suggest thru axle too. Everything always lines up perfect so no rub. Love it. It is the other piece of the puzzle that makes disks so nice to live with.
stevoo is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 12:29 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 30,225

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1572 Post(s)
Liked 644 Times in 365 Posts
Originally Posted by JonathanGennick
The first time you bleed brakes can be intimidating. And it can be a little bit annoying that every brand of brake seems to require some different adapter or screw size or something along those lines. And inevitably I have DOT fluid on hand when I want to bleed my mineral brakes, and mineral oil on hand when I want to bleed my DOT brakes.

Once you've bled a few times, you get the hang of it and it's not so bad.
Which came first?

To talk about hydraulic brakes in general before buying them is confusing and intimidating. To learn about hydraulic brakes you pretty much have to have one in front of you to look at and mess with. Once you've done it twice, they are no big deal. It's still a simple machine.

Bottom line: You can't learn about them before buying and you're afraid to buy until you learn.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 01:13 PM
  #10  
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 10,282

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Krampus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 3,535 Times in 2,622 Posts
Originally Posted by well biked
If you're using a drop bar/disc brake bike that's a singlespeed or uses shifters that aren't integrated with the brake levers (i.e. bar end shifters, etc) then TRP hylex brakes are absolutely awesome IME. I've got thousands of miles on them, and I rate them as good as really good mtb hydraulics. The TRP HY RD's are a poor substitute if you want hydraulic brakes ( I have experience with those, too), they feel and perform more like a mechanical disc than a hydraulic IMO. If you have a drop bar bike and want/need integrated shifters/brake levers and hydraulic brakes, the stuff from Shimano would be top choice IMO.
+1

I have only heard good things about the TRP HY RD, and as far as hydraulics go, I have heard TONS of complaints about avid hydraulics, and the most common solution to avid noise problems is to buy shimano
RubeRad is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 02:06 PM
  #11  
Full Member
 
ratell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 438
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 27 Posts
Originally Posted by KonaRider125
Thanks for the replies.

Would TRP HY RD brakes be a good option? I'm thinking ease of installing, replacing housing/cable.

TRP
I have been very happy with the hy rd's. I can't imagine needing more brake, so not sure how full hydraulic would be worth it. Of course I've never used full hydraulic...
ratell is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 02:22 PM
  #12  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,360 Times in 866 Posts
I leave the mechanical BB7 that are on there, since they work And are paid for.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 02:38 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 496

Bikes: Volagi Viaje (rando/gravel/tour), Cannondale Slice 4 (tri/TT), Motobecane Fantom PLUS X9 (plus tires MTB)

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I do most of my own bike maintenance and some upgrades/rebuilds.
My main commuter/road bike has a Shimano hydraulic road group. So far my experience has been these are actually LOWER maintenance than other brakes, because they're self-adjusting. Even if you have to change the pads, they drop right in and immediately self-adjust.
I did look at the manual for the brake bleeding procedure and it looks like a mid-level hassle at worst... but so far I haven't had any need to do it.
alathIN is offline  
Old 02-15-16, 03:05 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Tim_Iowa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Posts: 1,643

Bikes: 1997 Rivendell Road Standard 650b conversion (tourer), 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10 (gravel/tour), 2013 Foundry Auger disc (CX/gravel), 2016 Cannondale Fat CAAD 2 (MTB/winter), 2011 Cannondale Flash 29er Lefty (trail MTB)

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 167 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by KonaRider125
Thanks for the replies.

Would TRP HY RD brakes be a good option? I'm thinking ease of installing, replacing housing/cable.

TRP
I really like the Shimano XT-M785 hydraulic brakes on my fat bike. Very powerful, but easy to modulate.

My 'cross bike has Avid BB7R mechanical calipers and SRAM road brifters. The BB7R's stop OK, but only if the pads are VERY close to the rotor. If the pads are further away, I can't seem to squeeze the lever enough to get good braking force.
So, I have to mess with the brake pad adjustment dials a lot to keep the pads as close as possible without rubbing. The Shimano hydraulics work great without rubbing after one setup.

I bought a set of TRP HY RD brakes for this bike, hoping to get something in-between mechanical and hydraulic brake power. The guy I bought them from included some compressionless cable housing, which he says are key to getting the most out of the HY/RDs (the same housing would probably improve my BB7Rs as well).

I haven't installed the HY/RDs yet; I'll report once I do.
Tim_Iowa is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 03:43 AM
  #15  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 67

Bikes: Bikes are just like shoes, make sure you have the right ones for the right occasion

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Depends on what you like doing. I've adapted a Hope Evo/V4 to use on my Tandem with Campag Ergo levers. I designed and custom milled a new cam for the cylinder (mounted under the stem) so there is a very short direct cable run, with the long run to the back brake via hydraulic. Makes a huge difference to feel and performance.
As far as maintenance, bleed the brakes every 2 years, and replace the pads when they wear out. Hydraulic brakes are self adjusting for wear
fastbike is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
oupoot
Bicycle Mechanics
9
06-22-17 12:07 AM
Truckin75
Fifty Plus (50+)
45
06-05-17 11:03 AM
cyber.snow
Touring
75
04-17-17 11:38 AM
Joshyy
Mountain Biking
4
05-23-15 10:00 PM
swamptandem
Tandem Cycling
116
01-12-13 12:30 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.