Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Wheel set suggestions for fast/heavy rider

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Wheel set suggestions for fast/heavy rider

Old 02-18-16, 12:18 PM
  #1  
NYMXer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,495

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Wheel set suggestions for fast/heavy rider

Hello all, I am reaching out to you for suggestions to replace my standard wheels on my road bike. Currently I am 215 pounds, just big build, not really fat, I ride with the "A" group and do long distance rides too.

My stock spokes are not holding up and frequently are loose and need tuning about 3 times last year in 5 months. I am searching for stronger and faster wheels. I figure if I am going to replace them for my weight, I should look for faster ones too. I need suggestions as to what wheels (I am thinking complete rim and hub assembly) for a 10 speed rear and where to buy them.

I would consider used too and if you PM me you e mail, I will write to you there. I only want to do this once, so quality is more important than a bargain wheel that I won't be happy with.

Thanks for letting me pick your brains.
NYMXer is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 12:48 PM
  #2  
Eric S.
Senior Member
 
Eric S.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 925

Bikes: '04 LeMond Buenos Aires, '82 Bianchi Nuova Racing, De Rosa SLX, Bridgestone MB-1, Guerciotti TSX, Torpado Aelle, LeMond Tourmalet 853, Bridgestone Radac

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 33 Posts
I weigh about the same as you and have had a couple sets of Vuelta Corsa HD (36 spoke) wheels for a few years; one set nearly 6 years. Both are holding up great. They are sometimes priced as low as $130/pair from Nashbar, sometimes coinciding with free shipping.
Eric S. is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 12:58 PM
  #3  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,310 Times in 823 Posts
Have Peter White in NH Peter White Cycles Home Page Custom build you a set of wheels for You ,

You can call him and discuss Your specific needs .

There is the skill in the building that is Unspoken. in just saying a parts list.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 01:02 PM
  #4  
Jarrett2
Senior Member
 
Jarrett2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: DFW
Posts: 4,126

Bikes: Steel 1x's

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 631 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
This guy solved all my Clyde-based wheel problems:

Joe Young Wheels
Jarrett2 is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 01:08 PM
  #5  
RoadLight
Senior Member
 
RoadLight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 195
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
Hello all, I am reaching out to you for suggestions to replace my standard wheels on my road bike. Currently I am 215 pounds, just big build, not really fat, I ride with the "A" group and do long distance rides too.

My stock spokes are not holding up and frequently are loose and need tuning about 3 times last year in 5 months. I am searching for stronger and faster wheels. I figure if I am going to replace them for my weight, I should look for faster ones too. I need suggestions as to what wheels (I am thinking complete rim and hub assembly) for a 10 speed rear and where to buy them. ...
Hi NYMXer,

It would help if you specify a price range and tire size range. Since I don't know if you can afford $1,500 or more for a nice set of composite wheels, I'll offer a modest-priced alloy suggestion. I'm tall and have a muscular build so I started at about 215 lbs at the beginning of the 2015 road season and was down to 195 lbs by the autumn. I put in 4,200 miles, including two centuries on my 2008 Team Fuji road bike (58 cm carbon frame and fork). Many of those miles were ridden on a set of Shimano Ultegra WH-6700 wheels. This is an older model that supports up to 10-speed. I switched them out at the end of the year for a pair of WH-6800 (the current model) which supports up to 11-speed and includes the necessary spacer so a 10-speed cassette will fit, also. For a non-aero wheel, they are surprisingly fast in the wind (I ride near Lake Michigan and often deal with wind). They seem to offer less wind resistance than most alloy wheels and they have bladed spokes (16 spokes on the front wheel and 20 spokes on the rear wheel).

I do all of my own maintenance and like the design of the Shimano Ultegra hubs very much. The WH-6800 have an innovative system for adjusting the bearings.

Another feature of these wheels which makes them very unique: They can accept either regular clincher tires with inner tubes or the newer tubeless clincher tires. Plus, the inside of their rims are smooth and sealed so no seam tape is required---not even for a tubeless tire. And the wheels include a pair of valve stems for tubeless use. I've been using 25 mm Continental Gatorskin tires (the handmade-in-Germany version that have a kevlar bead) along with their racing inner tubes. My wife has the same wheels and uses the same tires in 23 mm. I haven't been tempted to try tubeless yet because they usually weigh more (most folks don't know that) and I hate having to mess with sealant. Besides, I ride at high road pressures and never need to worry about pinch flats.

These wheels are designed primarily for 23-25 mm wide tires. Because of your weight, you'll definitely want to stay with 25 mm like me. You could probably fit 28 mm tires on them, if your bike can accommodate it. But it wouldn't be as stable as it would be on a wider wheel.

Originally, Shimano marketed the WH-6800 at a suggested retail price of $699.99. But they appear to have lowered it to $399.99 or $494.99 (depending on which bike shop you ask). In the U.S. you can pick up a pair for $359.99 from Bike Tires Direct. Or, you can import them from Chain Reaction Cycles in Ireland for $269.99 (that's where I purchased mine and it cost me about $30 import duty to the U.S.).

In spite of the low spoke count (a feature intended to reduce air resistance), my wheels have stayed true. However, because I'm a heavier rider, I try to be careful with my road bike. I ride only on smoothly paved road and don't do stunts like bunny hops, wheelies and the like.

I highly recommend Shimano Ultegra WH-6800 as a good all-around wheel set for a medium price range.

Kind regards, RoadLight
RoadLight is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 01:09 PM
  #6  
FastJake
Constant tinkerer
 
FastJake's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 7,859
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
Liked 52 Times in 43 Posts
What wheels do you have now? You don't necessarily need heavier wheels, but probably need more spokes, especially on the rear wheel. Butted spokes can help compared to straight gauge. Finally, the quality of the build will make or break ANY wheelset.

I'd recommend something like a ~30mm deep aluminum rim (~460-520g). 32 spokes rear and 24 or 28 spokes front. With butted spokes and a good build that should be more than enough.

Genuine Shimano hubs are all I'll use anymore.

Originally Posted by Eric S. View Post
I weigh about the same as you and have had a couple sets of Vuelta Corsa HD (36 spoke) wheels for a few years; one set nearly 6 years. Both are holding up great. They are sometimes priced as low as $130/pair from Nashbar, sometimes coinciding with free shipping.
The price on those is tempting but holy crap are they heavy (1052g front 1395g rear!) I wouldn't want to use anything like that on a fast group ride.

Cheap no-name cartridge bearing hubs are another huge minus for me.
FastJake is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 01:26 PM
  #7  
Mr IGH
afraid of whales
 
Mr IGH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Front Range, CO
Posts: 4,306
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 347 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I weigh the same as OP, I've ridden Mavic Aksiums for the last five years. This year I upgraded to Shimano WH-RS81-C24-TL, tubeless ready, saves ~300gm overall. There's no need for high spoke count wheels, just get a set of low spoke count wheels from a reliable company. Easy to find for under $500.
Mr IGH is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 01:30 PM
  #8  
NYMXer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,495

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Thanks for the replies so far and I will answer some of the questions asked.

to Roadlight, I didn't list a price range because, well.... I was not sure and didn't want price to be the determining factor, but cheaper is better than more if they are comparable wheels, sort of speak. I would think $600 is a fair price but would spend a little more for a lot better deal. I ride on 25's and like them over a skinnier tire. I don't think I will go wider than 28's, ever. Weight, durability and speed are all part of the equation here and they are all equally important. I will look into your suggestion and appreciate the input, THANKS!

to FastJake, thanks on picking up on the weight and bearing details. I only want to do this once and maybe even transfer them to my next bike if I can, assuming that one day there will be a next bike, haha. Current wheels are Shimano R570 (maybe R510, hard to tell). As an A rider, speed is important to consider but I am still too new to this sport to make a knowledgeable decision on my own. The local bike shops are all over the place with their suggestions, so I figured I'd ask here.

Basically, looking for an affordable deal on strong, fast and light wheels.
NYMXer is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 01:48 PM
  #9  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,310 Times in 823 Posts
Get some at the Local Bike Shop or take your online Bargain to them to hand check them for final truing and tensioning.

The wheels will be machine made and tensioned , to get the low price . hand checking them is Important.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 01:53 PM
  #10  
NYMXer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,495

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Get some at the Local Bike Shop or take your online Bargain to them to hand check them for final truing and tensioning.

The wheels will be machine made and tensioned , to get the low price . hand checking them is Important.

I had a riding buddy explain that getting the wheels "equally torqued" is the single best thing he ever did to his wheels and that greatly improved the wheels ability to remain true. It does make a lot of sense, if all spokes are "pulling" equally, then that would be better than starting out with the wheel already destined to go out of true due to an uneven pull from a few spokes.
NYMXer is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 02:03 PM
  #11  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,310 Times in 823 Posts
Maintaining them with the occasional wheel truing checkup will Help as well ..
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 02:06 PM
  #12  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 12,425

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 97 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5159 Post(s)
Liked 2,453 Times in 1,433 Posts
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
Hello all, I am reaching out to you for suggestions to replace my standard wheels on my road bike. Currently I am 215 pounds, just big build, not really fat, I ride with the "A" group and do long distance rides too.

My stock spokes are not holding up and frequently are loose and need tuning about 3 times last year in 5 months. I am searching for stronger and faster wheels. I figure if I am going to replace them for my weight, I should look for faster ones too. I need suggestions as to what wheels (I am thinking complete rim and hub assembly) for a 10 speed rear and where to buy them.
As mentioned, Peter White. Has an incredible reputation and you can call to talk about what to use.
https://www.universalcycles.com/wheelkit.php you can choose from thousands of combinations of rim, hub, and spokes. Hand built and good prices considering the customization. This doesnt answer the 'what should i use' question, but does give you an option for where to buy.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 02:25 PM
  #13  
ypsetihw
Senior Member
 
ypsetihw's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 1,109

Bikes: s-1

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 221 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I am about the same size as you and I am on Shimano RS10 stock wheels and have never had any issues. The rear needs trued but I've put over 1000 miles on them before that happened. if you don't go hammering curbs or potholes or loading up panniers, you really shouldn't need uber wheels on your road bike, you're not really THAT big.

also, when people talk about "fast" wheels, they are usually either talking about either lighter or more aero. if you are building heavy duty rims with a higher spoke count, it definitely will NOT be lighter. aero is subjective, but unless you are doing solo TT efforts, my guess is that it will make negligible difference.

if you want to ride faster, do sprint intervals. the idea that a wheelset will make you magically faster is marketing to get you to drop $1000 on stuff.

if you want to gear up and have money burning a hold in your pocket, then by all means get after it. with that said, I agree with Eric S. - you can get plenty a decent rim set on Nashbar for under $300, less if you hit a sale. the Vuelta HDs are very well rated and really cheap.
ypsetihw is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 03:01 PM
  #14  
RoadLight
Senior Member
 
RoadLight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 195
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by ypsetihw View Post
... but unless you are doing solo TT efforts, my guess is that it will make negligible difference.

if you want to ride faster, do sprint intervals. the idea that a wheelset will make you magically faster is marketing to get you to drop $1000 on stuff. ...
Hi ypsetihw,

Why "guess" and be wrong? There is plenty of hard data to prove your statement about "negligible difference" is false. The wheels you use can most certainly have a significant difference beyond specialties like "solo TT efforts". I'm like the OP, I like to ride fast, too. My daily training circuit is a 35 mile loop, often with quite a bit of wind. Wheels sure make a big difference on my ride and it's no solo TT!!! And why do you think it takes "magic" to make $1000 wheels faster? It's mostly science conducted in wind tunnels. There's a great American company in Oregon, Knight Composites, who publishes their wind tunnel data showing their aero composite wheels next to many of the other top brands. No "magic" there---just good engineering and diligent testing.

And why try to move the discussion to training ("sprint intervals")? The topic under discussion here is wheels. If you want to discuss what has the greatest effect on performance, then start your own topic on that subject. I doubt the OP thinks that wheels are the most important factor---but he needs to buy new ones and he's asking for advice so let's help him by staying on the subject and not telling him to buy cheap wheels and exercise more!

Originally Posted by ypsetihw View Post
... if you want to gear up and have money burning a hold in your pocket, then by all means get after it. with that said, I agree with Eric S. - you can get plenty a decent rim set on Nashbar for under $300, less if you hit a sale. the Vuelta HDs are very well rated and really cheap.
What a negative attitude! Why would you think the OP wants to burn money? Or, why would the OP waste money if he spends more than you would on his wheels? Sure, a wise shopper can get some good wheels for under $300. I suggested as much. But that doesn't make it a waste of money to spend more if the wheels chosen provide value for their price. There's no doubt that there is expensive junk for sale in the bicycle industry. But there's also some great bikes and bike parts that are expensive. The fact that some of the top gear is out of my price range doesn't make me assume that it's a con. I do my research and learn the facts. Perhaps you should start doing that, too.

Regards, RoadLight
RoadLight is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 03:43 PM
  #15  
ypsetihw
Senior Member
 
ypsetihw's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 1,109

Bikes: s-1

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 221 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by RoadLight View Post
Hi ypsetihw,

Why "guess" and be wrong? There is plenty of hard data to prove your statement about "negligible difference" is false. The wheels you use can most certainly have a significant difference beyond specialties like "solo TT efforts". I'm like the OP, I like to ride fast, too. My daily training circuit is a 35 mile loop, often with quite a bit of wind. Wheels sure make a big difference on my ride and it's no solo TT!!! And why do you think it takes "magic" to make $1000 wheels faster? It's mostly science conducted in wind tunnels. There's a great American company in Oregon, Knight Composites, who publishes their wind tunnel data showing their aero composite wheels next to many of the other top brands. No "magic" there---just good engineering and diligent testing.

And why try to move the discussion to training ("sprint intervals")? The topic under discussion here is wheels. If you want to discuss what has the greatest effect on performance, then start your own topic on that subject. I doubt the OP thinks that wheels are the most important factor---but he needs to buy new ones and he's asking for advice so let's help him by staying on the subject and not telling him to buy cheap wheels and exercise more!



What a negative attitude! Why would you think the OP wants to burn money? Or, why would the OP waste money if he spends more than you would on his wheels? Sure, a wise shopper can get some good wheels for under $300. I suggested as much. But that doesn't make it a waste of money to spend more if the wheels chosen provide value for their price. There's no doubt that there is expensive junk for sale in the bicycle industry. But there's also some great bikes and bike parts that are expensive. The fact that some of the top gear is out of my price range doesn't make me assume that it's a con. I do my research and learn the facts. Perhaps you should start doing that, too.

Regards, RoadLight
I'd say a few percent is negligible, and at his weight and build, which is very similar to mine, I'm guessing he can improve his power/weight ratio more by shedding a few lbs than by buying a $1000 wheelset. If you are drafting in a group ride, aero wheels will not make a noticeable difference. If it's your "daily training circuit" then your effort is more like that of a solo TT, as I stated, in which case you might notice it. With that said, if it's windy, then aero wheels will NOT help in a crosswind, so I stand by what I said. Yes, many many bike parts are overpriced and I will stand by that all day every day. For every article you can find about "wheelsets being the best upgrade" you can find an article that says "ride up grades, not upgrades."

I do a lot of research and riding too, and I have learned that I cannot buy speed. I also know there is a large industry invested in making you think that you can. I'm not negative, I'm trying to reassure him that he can get something that will be built well and last for less money than he thinks he needs to spend.

The OP was asking about "fast wheels" for a big guy, and the reality is that almost any reasonable name brand wheelset off the shelf should be suitable for a 215lb rider. He's not that big. And the idea that a wheelset will make you instantly faster is BOOOOOOOOOGUS.

I knew this was gonna cause some blowback, but that was quick boys! Good job!
ypsetihw is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 03:49 PM
  #16  
FastJake
Constant tinkerer
 
FastJake's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 7,859
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
Liked 52 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
to FastJake, thanks on picking up on the weight and bearing details. I only want to do this once and maybe even transfer them to my next bike if I can, assuming that one day there will be a next bike, haha. Current wheels are Shimano R570 (maybe R510, hard to tell).
They're probably the RS10. A quick search reveals lots of complaints about broken spokes for this wheelset. While the components are fine, I think it's a machine built set and therefore doesn't have the proper tensioning and stress relieving that a hand built set should have.

If you want the cheapest solution and your rims aren't anywhere near worn out I'd have your current set completely rebuilt with all new spokes and nipples by a competent builder. Once this is done they should be strong enough to hold up to your weight.

If you are sick of these wheels and just want a new set, see my post above. I don't have any specific recommendations since I built all my wheels myself. But I like Velocity, Kinlin, Mavic, and Sun rims since they're usually inexpensive and I've had good luck with all of them.

Personally I prefer conventionally built wheels with standard components over "wheel systems" like the Mavic Ksyrium and so many others. When a spoke, nipple, or hub part fails on a "wheel system" it can be difficult, expensive, or impossible to get it replaced.
FastJake is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 03:55 PM
  #17  
dr_lha
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 4,843

Bikes: 2016 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross v5, 2015 Ritchey Road Logic, 1998 Specialized Rockhopper, 2017 Raleigh Grand Prix

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 374 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
Thanks for the replies so far and I will answer some of the questions asked.

to Roadlight, I didn't list a price range because, well.... I was not sure and didn't want price to be the determining factor, but cheaper is better than more if they are comparable wheels, sort of speak. I would think $600 is a fair price but would spend a little more for a lot better deal.
I think if you're looking the the $600 range, the best wheels you can get are these:

November Bicycles: Race smart. - Nimbus Ti Select
dr_lha is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 05:26 PM
  #18  
NYMXer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,495

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
There certainly is lot's of good info here, thanks to all. There are also some assumptions that I'm not sure how they came about but for sure, I don't have "money to burn" and naturally will not expect new wheels to make me "magically faster". What I was saying is that I am looking for a strong, lightweight and fast set of wheels for up to $600. naturally, if I can get an almost equal set for $300, why would I spend more than that?

Roadlight and FastJake have a good understanding of what I am seeking here with this thread. My conditioning is good and I have (finally), a decent bike but the wheels are the weak link that needs attention before the spring season starts. I understand that I am the engine and will make the bike faster through conditioning but the bike does have some input with my output (haha, see what I did there).

Looks like I have been given some homework to research and decide what will become my next bike investment. Geez, no one warned me how expensive cycling can be! It's still cheaper than a gym set and lots more fun!
NYMXer is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 05:36 PM
  #19  
dtrain
L-I-V-I-N
 
dtrain's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Stafford, OR
Posts: 4,801
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That's my weight range (on a good day). I have two sets of handbuilt 28f/32r wheels with wider rims. One is r45 hubs + Pacenti SL23 rims. Slightly older and cheaper set is DT350 hubs and HED Belgium C2. I'm not sure the r45s would be worth full retail (luckily I paid less), but otherwise I'm happy with both sets.

+ 1 on the November Ti set. I'd also love to plug Jude at Sugar Wheelworks in Portland. She's really great to work with, but might be a little over your budget. A kit from Bdop or BHS could work too if you have a local builder/wrench.
__________________
"The older you do get, the more rules they're gonna try to get you to follow. You just gotta keep livin', man, L-I-V-I-N." - Wooderson

'14 carbon Synapse - '12 CAAD 10 5 - '99 Gary Fisher Big Sur
dtrain is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 06:12 PM
  #20  
dr_lha
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 4,843

Bikes: 2016 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross v5, 2015 Ritchey Road Logic, 1998 Specialized Rockhopper, 2017 Raleigh Grand Prix

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 374 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 9 Posts
I don't think $300 will get you wheels that are comparable to those Novembers. However this is a really great wheelset for just under $300.

H Plus Son Archetype Wheelset Shimano Ultegra 6800 hubs 32h [74762] - $289.00 Velomine.com : Worldwide Bicycle Shop, fixed gear track bike wheelsets campagnolo super record vintage bike

i have a set of the cheaper 105 hub ones on my cross bike and weight more than you and they're still true after 1500 miles of riding on them.
dr_lha is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 06:24 PM
  #21  
ypsetihw
Senior Member
 
ypsetihw's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 1,109

Bikes: s-1

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 221 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
I am looking for a strong, lightweight and fast set of wheels for up to $600. naturally, if I can get an almost equal set for $300, why would I spend more than that?
Hey man I didn't mean to turn on the flamethrower or get everyone all worked up. I'm in the same boat as you. I'm at about 210 right now but when I got my bike I was bigger than you, and I got what I could afford and I ended up on a decent aluminum frame with carbon forks, 105 drivetrain, and RS10 wheels, just like you. I have done a TON of research into wheelsets, because I believed all the hype. But that's all it is, hype and advertising. If you are at the edge of your performance threshold, then light/aero wheels are something to consider. But hey, we're Clydes, right?!

Honestly, I got a bigger performance and comfort gain and less stress on the rim by fitting a wider tire (I currently run 25mm front and 28mm rear) and proper tire pressures. I run a Conti Ultra gatorskin up front and picked up a Conti GrandSport Race 28 for the rear for $25 on ebay. ****** deal if you ask me. If you want aero at your size, get some tight fitting kit and work on your drop bar position. It will make infinitely more aero impact than a set of rims. If you want lighter weight, lose some weight! You are talking about a couple hundred grams over 95 kilos!!! You could take a crap and lose more weight than that wheelset! Just think about that for a second . . . Just plain not worth the money.

You are not too big to ride standard wheels, just watch where you're going. Get some good tires (as wide as will fit), and keep working on the diet and your training. If you want to buy stuff, then buy stuff, but if you want to be fast, you have to ride fast. You can't buy that.

There is a popular saying: cheap, light, strong - pick two. For a good wheelset, $600 is cheap. Light and strong isn't cheap. Cheap and strong isn't light. Light and cheap isn't strong. Gotta compromise somewhere. I would say go spend $30 (my shop will tension and true rims for $15 each) and get someone to fix up the wheels you have. Put some good rubber on, and as I said before, GO DO SPRINTS :-)

I also do the A-rides with my club, and even take extended pulls at the front. I regularly ride 30+ miles and did a couple metric and imperial centuries last summer. I thought that meant I was fast, until I did a couple races last summer. It did not go so well. You know what I did? I bought a trainer, lost some weight, and started doing intervals on the regular. I started lifting weights and mentally preparing and made a winter bike so I could train year round. You know what I didn't do? Buy a fancy "fast" wheelset. I'll let you know how it goes when Crit season starts.
ypsetihw is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 07:02 PM
  #22  
NYMXer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,495

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
ypsetihw, I'm sure you mean very well in your responses, but they tend to come across condescending in nature with a twist of arrogance. I don't think that you mean to come across that way, but at least, for me... that's how I read it. Why you continue to think I am looking to get faster through new wheels is beyond me when the only person who ever said that is you.

So, again, I need stronger wheels. I do not abuse my bike, jump it or anything of the sort. I do ride fast and aggressive including downhills and turns. I have a tendency to climb a gear or two taller than most other riders because I have the power to do so. On the flats is where I am weakest, or let's say, not superior to other cyclists because I can not pull away from them like I can on the climbs or descents. So.... if I am going to spend money on stronger wheels, I might as well get ones that are lighter than some others and roll better due to superior bearings. Is that too much to ask for?

The "fancy, fast wheels" was never a phrase from my keyboard, just yours and I find it debauching in nature and uncalled for. I'm not sure what you are out to prove here, all I am looking for is some honest advice, what are you looking for?
NYMXer is offline  
Old 02-18-16, 09:02 PM
  #23  
FastJake
Constant tinkerer
 
FastJake's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 7,859
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
Liked 52 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
I'm sure you mean very well in your responses, but they tend to come across condescending in nature with a twist of arrogance.
IMHO it's better to ignore those people who miss the point of the thread, are argumentative, and don't offer any help towards the original question. I could debate many of his points but would rather not get the thread that far off track.
Originally Posted by dr_lha View Post
I think if you're looking the the $600 range, the best wheels you can get are these: November Bicycles: Race smart. - Nimbus Ti Select
These look sweet. Pretty much exactly what I'd recommend. I'm a huge fan of Shimano hubs but I hear White Industries makes some pretty good stuff too...
FastJake is offline  
Old 02-19-16, 05:05 AM
  #24  
acorn54
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 351
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
i'll add two more cents. from your original post nymxer, i see you ride in the A class group. i personally don't, but imo you have to take the advice of experienced road racers. i am certainly not in your catergory, i ride, what is a jalopy by your standards,(a fuji Absolute model with a steel frame.). it seems you need to be weight conscious, as well as getting wheels that aerodynamically, give a minimum of wind resistance, in addition to being strong.
i just thought i'd add this to the conversation, as it is my take on the qualities that would be of most importance in your case, for shopping around for wheels.
acorn54 is offline  
Old 02-19-16, 07:06 AM
  #25  
NYMXer
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,495

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by acorn54 View Post
i'll add two more cents. from your original post nymxer, i see you ride in the A class group. i personally don't, but imo you have to take the advice of experienced road racers. i am certainly not in your catergory, i ride, what is a jalopy by your standards,(a fuji Absolute model with a steel frame.). it seems you need to be weight conscious, as well as getting wheels that aerodynamically, give a minimum of wind resistance, in addition to being strong.
i just thought i'd add this to the conversation, as it is my take on the qualities that would be of most importance in your case, for shopping around for wheels.
If you were to meet me, you would notice that I am pretty fit and lean at 215 pounds and don't have much, if any weight to lose. As far as bikes go, I don't think I've ever used the term "jalopy" before and am not a cyclist snob.

So, forgive me but I just don't know where you got those ideas from and felt the need to express them here. I mean, I sit here, for the life of me and wonder if reading and comprehension have been eliminated from our schools?

If I am missing something and am mistaken, then let me apologize now but every time I read your post, you imply things from your own mind and not from anything that I've said. I am not weight conscious, not looking for magic wheels that will make me suddenly faster and certainly don't look down my nose at slower cyclist. I've never said that I wanted aero wheels, just "faster", as in quality bearings and lighter weight. If that turns out to be an aero wheel set, even better, but I never used that term in this, or any other post!
NYMXer is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.