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Rigid Fork Upgrade on older Trek 6700

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Rigid Fork Upgrade on older Trek 6700

Old 06-05-16, 04:10 PM
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Blurry
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Rigid Fork Upgrade on older Trek 6700

Hello Everyone, my fork has "always" caused me some trouble. I have contemplated doing some maintenance but in the end I just want to replace it with a rigid for as it is the most cost effective option and supports my future goals of adding disc capability.

WHAT I AM TRYING TO DO
First off I want to get my bike working so I can get out on trails with a friend for the summer (I only have a working road bike and another commuter). Looking to "cheaply" replace the fork with a rigid fork that ideally accepts both V and disc brakes.

ULTIMATE LONG TERM GOAL
Convert this to a winter bike for next year and upgrade the V brakes to disc along with a few other tweaks. I don't plan on selling it.

MY BIKE MECHANICS SKILL LEVEL
Enthusiastic beginner

WHAT I AM CONSIDERING (But not entirely sure if they fit or are ideal)

• Surly Troll Fork $110
Surly Troll Fork (on the higher end pricewise for me)
Surly Troll Fork > Components > Forks & Suspension > Rigid Mountain Forks | Jenson USA

• Nashbar Rigid 26-in. Mountain Bike Fork $50
https://www.amazon.com/Nashbar-Rigid-...surly+fork#Ask

OR any other suggestions that you may have. I am in Canada and I am also not opposed to used.

Here are my forks measurements and some info. If there is anything else you need please ask.

The bike is an older Trek 6700 purchased sometime around 2005-2006 and if I recall correctly it was a last year model as well.

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Old 06-06-16, 02:12 AM
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dabac
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Youre sorta missing the most important measurement if you want the ride characteristics to change as little as possible - the axle-to-crown measurement with you on the bike.
But with 110 mm of exposed upper fork leg, I'd guess at 100 mm travel. So measure ATC now, subtract 25-30 mm and go shopping for a fork of that length.
(Rake is important too, but different lengths are easier to get than different rakes IME)
Steerer tube length shouldn't be a concern when buying new, but might be hugely important when buying used.
100 mm "axle width" or over-locknut-distance is by far the most common. And while options are around, 9 mm q/r axles are also very common.
Looks like 1 1/8" diameter steerer.
I'd shop by dimensions rather than brand. Although Surly does have a good rep.
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Old 06-07-16, 12:19 PM
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Blurry
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Thanks so much dabac!!! I am laughing at myself a bit here for not doing that measurement. It figures that I would go a bit OCD in the wrong direction. Thanks again.
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Old 06-07-16, 12:28 PM
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Wilfred Laurier
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Either of the forks listed should be fine. Both are 'suspension corrected' - they have a length that is supposed to emulate a suspension fork. The manufacturers didn't have your fork to measure when they designed theirs, though, so there will be minor differences... and this will most probably be absolutely no problem. THe minor differences will create a very minor difference in handling that you will get used to in about five minutes of riding, and forget about it forever after. It used to be SOP to replace short non-suspension-corrected forks with suspension forks that were 2 to 3 inches longer, and while it didn't always work out perfectly, the bikes were just about always rideable, and the difference between your Rockshox and the forks you linked will be a lot less different than what we used to tolerate.
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Old 06-07-16, 01:08 PM
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I would get the Nashbar fork. If you have a co-op near you, you can do the work yourself. I just helped a woman replace a fork on Sunday. It took less than 15 minutes.
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Old 06-09-16, 04:39 PM
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Blurry
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Thanks Wilfred Laurier and techsensei.

Wilfred, I appreciate the candid nature of your response, it also offers a great perspective too.

techsensei, I do have a co-op near me, that is a good idea that I never considered exploring.
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