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How tight should cassette be?

Old 05-15-05, 02:09 PM
  #1  
shane45
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How tight should cassette be?

I took my rear wheel off my bike for an unrelated reason, but noticed that my 9-speed cassette has some movement on the hub. How tight should it be? Should there be any "rocking" movement at all, or should it be rock solid to the hub?

(The "rocking" movement is not severe, but certainly noticeable by sight and feel.)
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Old 05-15-05, 02:21 PM
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I tighten it pretty darn tight. There's these little "teeph" that make it go clickety (like the sound of a ratchet). I turn it past this and make it tight enough to NOT MOVE. This does not require much force. Try it, you'll see. Just give a good nudge. Tight. Not too tight. You'll need a tool for the cassette. You only need a chain whip for loosening or removing. Hope this helps, dawg.
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Old 05-15-05, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by shane45
I took my rear wheel off my bike for an unrelated reason, but noticed that my 9-speed cassette has some movement on the hub. How tight should it be? Should there be any "rocking" movement at all, or should it be rock solid to the hub?

(The "rocking" movement is not severe, but certainly noticeable by sight and feel.)
Hmmmm.

First of all, the torque spec on that cassette lockring is around 30 ft/lbs. That's a bunch! Nobody whose not using a torque wrench gets close to that spec. Frankly, I think that it's a little overkill, but that's the spec. Honestly, I doubt that's your problem.

With 8-speed stuff, sometimes it's necessary to fit a 1mm spacer behind the biggest cog but that's not usually an issue with 9-speed. Is it possible you could have an old freehub body that requires the spacer?
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Old 05-15-05, 02:46 PM
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It could also be some play in the freehub itself, instead of the cogs. It's usually only noticeable on cheaper hubs.

If the freehub is loose, fixing it is difficult. Luckily, I don't think a small amount of freehub play impacts shifting the way loose cogs can.
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Old 05-15-05, 03:20 PM
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Torque spec on Ultegra 9 speed cassette is 40NM, not ft-lbs. NM is way different than ft-lbs.

PJ
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Old 05-15-05, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by pjbaz
Torque spec on Ultegra 9 speed cassette is 40NM, not ft-lbs. NM is way different than ft-lbs.

PJ
Why don't you take the time to look it up NM vs. ft/lbs then post back and tell us what you found.
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Old 05-15-05, 03:41 PM
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40NM is 30ft-lbs.
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Old 05-15-05, 03:44 PM
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Well 29.502486 to science geeks
That was too funny retro grouch.
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Old 05-15-05, 03:46 PM
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1 Nm = 1.356 ft-lb

40 Nm = 29.5 ft-lbs

Seems you're right, RG.
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Old 05-15-05, 03:49 PM
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So, a simple rule of thumb would be to take the ft-lbs spec and add another third of it to get Nm.
Or to go from Nm to ft-lbs, simply subtract a quarter.
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Old 05-15-05, 07:02 PM
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Just a slight correction: 1 NM. = .7375 ft-lb.
40 x 1.356 = 54.24 ft-lbs. LOL
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Old 05-16-05, 02:26 AM
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Ah yes, I got it backwards. I calculated the conversion factor for one direction but used it the other...
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Old 05-16-05, 09:16 AM
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Thanks for posting the info CdCf. I meant what you knew. Sometimes I just get lazy because my torque wrench has Newton Meters on one side and foot pounds on the other side.
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