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My New (Literally New) 2005 Bianchi Veloce

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My New (Literally New) 2005 Bianchi Veloce

Old 08-19-16, 05:00 AM
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UKFan4Sure 
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My New (Literally New) 2005 Bianchi Veloce

So the story goes I bought a 2005 Bianchi Veloce from the original owner's estate. I think it was one of those situations where the person bought it on a whim, rode it once, and then decided it wasn't their cup of tea. So it sat, and sat.

I am now bringing it back to life, knocking off the years of dust and dirt.

I have noticed the original chain lube is frozen in time; like new, but dusty and crusty. Any tips for getting the old lube off and getting it lubed back up?

Also, any other things I need to consider, like new tubes, tires? I mean PHYSICALLY, the Vittoria's Rubino Tech's look brand new, but should they be trusted?!

Thanks!!!


Last edited by UKFan4Sure; 08-19-16 at 05:07 AM.
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Old 08-19-16, 07:08 AM
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Great find.

Remove the chain and soak it in mineral spirits or kerosene to remove the old grease and dirt. You can use Simple Green or other water based cleaner but you have to be sure the chain is completely dry, inside and out, before reinstalling. Relube with the lube of your choice and reinstall with either Shimano's specific joining pin for a Shimano chain or a suitable width master link for any make chain. Do NOT reuse the pin you push out.

The grease in the hubs and headset bearings is at least 11 years old and may have dried out. I'd open them up and confirm the factory grease is still ok or relube if needed. The bottom bracket should be fine if it's a cartridge but should be checked if it's a cup-and-cone type.

The tires may be usable if the bike was stored in a cool, dark place away from electric motors but otherwise they are suspect. Probably worth replacing them if there is any question. The brake blocks are also suspect after all of this time.
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Old 08-19-16, 07:27 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Great find.

Relube with the lube of your choice and reinstall with either Shimano's specific joining pin for a Shimano chain or a suitable width master link for any make chain.
The bike is equipped with Campagnolo components. 10 speed chains are rejoined using Campagnolo's HD link, kind of pricy. I wouldn't remove the chain at all, I would wipe it down using a solvent soaked rag to remove surface dirt, let dry, and then lube the chain and wipe off any excess. If the bike wan't ridden, the chain doesn't have any dirt inside the links

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Old 08-19-16, 09:54 AM
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The chain already had a snap-type master link. I pulled it and stuck it in my ultrasonic cleaner with simple green. Worked well. I used a wax type chain lube
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Old 08-19-16, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Great find.

Remove the chain and soak it in mineral spirits or kerosene to remove the old grease and dirt. You can use Simple Green or other water based cleaner but you have to be sure the chain is completely dry, inside and out, before reinstalling. Relube with the lube of your choice and reinstall with either Shimano's specific joining pin for a Shimano chain or a suitable width master link for any make chain. Do NOT reuse the pin you push out.

The grease in the hubs and headset bearings is at least 11 years old and may have dried out. I'd open them up and confirm the factory grease is still ok or relube if needed. The bottom bracket should be fine if it's a cartridge but should be checked if it's a cup-and-cone type.

The tires may be usable if the bike was stored in a cool, dark place away from electric motors but otherwise they are suspect. Probably worth replacing them if there is any question. The brake blocks are also suspect after all of this time.
What in the world do electric motors do to tires? Ionize the air allowing faster aging of the rubber? Interesting.
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Old 08-19-16, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by UKFan4Sure View Post
What in the world do electric motors do to tires? Ionize the air allowing faster aging of the rubber? Interesting.
They generate small amounts of ozone that degrades the rubber.
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Old 08-19-16, 11:11 AM
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Nice bike!

Yes, ozone degrades tires, but it'd be obvious, like cracking and blistering of the rubber; so if they look brand new and the casing isn't frayed they're likely fine.

Cables are the other thing to check - might have gotten rusted or frayed at the anchor points.

And I'd make sure all the bolts are tight - starting with the stem at both ends.
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Old 08-19-16, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Remove the chain and soak it in mineral spirits or kerosene to remove the old grease and dirt... and reinstall with either Shimano's specific joining pin for a Shimano chain or a suitable width master link for any make chain. Do NOT reuse the pin you push out.
Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
The bike is equipped with Campagnolo components. 10 speed chains are rejoined using Campagnolo's HD link...
Originally Posted by UKFan4Sure View Post
The chain already had a snap-type master link...
Bianchi, at least in the USA, didn't necessarily use Campagnolo chains with Campy drivetrains or Shimano chains with Shimano drivetrains. My '06 Bianchi San Mateo has a Campagnolo Veloce groupset and was originally equipped with a KMC DX10SC chain. According to Bikepedia, some other Bianchis around the same time had SRAM chains on Shimano drivetrains. Whether it's SRAM, KMC, or whatever, UKFan's chain has a quick link and he's already figured things out, so problem solved.

Getting back to the original question... If the tires look good, I'd ride 'em. 11 years isn't that old. Lube the chain, give the bike a cursory inspection, ride, and enjoy!
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Old 08-19-16, 11:31 AM
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Even if the tires have minor sidewall checking and do not leak they are probably OK to ride; the strength if the tires is in the fabric plies, which do not degrade like the rubber does, and the inner tubes which are somewhat protected are what holds the air. Agree that the hub and headset bearings should be attended to; I would hit all of the other bearings and pivots with some lube as well. And check the brake pads, they tend to dry out and harden with time.
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Old 08-19-16, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
Bianchi, at least in the USA, didn't necessarily use Campagnolo chains with Campy drivetrains or Shimano chains with Shimano drivetrains. My '06 Bianchi San Mateo has a Campagnolo Veloce groupset and was originally equipped with a KMC DX10SC chain. According to Bikepedia, some other Bianchis around the same time had SRAM chains on Shimano drivetrains. Whether it's SRAM, KMC, or whatever, UKFan's chain has a quick link and he's already figured things out, so problem solved.

Getting back to the original question... If the tires look good, I'd ride 'em. 11 years isn't that old. Lube the chain, give the bike a cursory inspection, ride, and enjoy!
I just looked and this is a DX10. I think it says KMC-4F or AF, hard to tell
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Old 08-19-16, 12:28 PM
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The Campagnolo hubs and bottom bracket on this bike will have sealed cartridge bearings which aren't designed to be serviceable. Replace the hubs' bearings or the whole bottom bracket if they're rough; otherwise just keep pedaling.
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Old 08-19-16, 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post
The Campagnolo hubs and bottom bracket on this bike will have sealed cartridge bearings which aren't designed to be serviceable. Replace the hubs' bearings or the whole bottom bracket if they're rough; otherwise just keep pedaling.
Thanks!@
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Old 08-20-16, 05:24 AM
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Originally Posted by DiabloScott View Post
Nice bike!

Yes, ozone degrades tires, but it'd be obvious, like cracking and blistering of the rubber; so if they look brand new and the casing isn't frayed they're likely fine.

Cables are the other thing to check - might have gotten rusted or frayed at the anchor points.

And I'd make sure all the bolts are tight - starting with the stem at both ends.
Good tips! Thank you! I'll heed those.
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Old 08-20-16, 08:05 AM
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UKFan4Sure, Be prepared to buy new tires yet go ahead and ride the old ones. I had a similar situation a couple of years ago and to my surprise the old Conti GP tires performed quite well for a number of miles.

Otherwise check the bike over carefully.

Brad
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Old 08-20-16, 08:24 AM
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Nice time capsule!

Looks like you got the chain clean, good. New tires, tube and rim strap. Don't skimp there. When you have time I would systematically thoroughly clean and repack all of the bearings. I'd start with the wheel hubs, then BB, then headset, then jockey wheels. Pull the cables and clean them and re-grease with the lightest PTFE grease you have. If it were my bike, I'd get brand new Shimano Dura Ace cables all the way around. I did for my old Pinarello and wow did it make a huge difference! They felt brand new.

Very cool bike.

Last edited by drlogik; 08-20-16 at 08:37 AM.
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Old 08-21-16, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by drlogik View Post
Nice time capsule!

Looks like you got the chain clean, good. New tires, tube and rim strap. Don't skimp there. When you have time I would systematically thoroughly clean and repack all of the bearings. I'd start with the wheel hubs, then BB, then headset, then jockey wheels. Pull the cables and clean them and re-grease with the lightest PTFE grease you have. If it were my bike, I'd get brand new Shimano Dura Ace cables all the way around. I did for my old Pinarello and wow did it make a huge difference! They felt brand new.

Very cool bike.
Thanks. I was happy to get it, for sure. It is my first Campy bike and getting used to the thumb down shifter is interesting. I am finding that the Campy hoods are smaller than I'm used to and I don't like that. The Shimano are beefier and more significant in hand. The brake levers seem a bit on the cheap side, but the brakes work extremely well, none-the-less. But boy does this system shift well. I have found so far that the 30 chain ring on this triple isn't needed, and that for most runs except fast downhill, the middle one works for most rolling hills. At this point, I'm not sure how often I'll be riding it, but I love the feel and smoothness of this steel frame. Running down the road, this bike is nearly silent. I have a Specialized Secteur that has a very good riding position for this old man's 54 year old body. Given a long ride, it's coming off the hanger every time. I may convert it to 105's at some point, but for now, the Tiagra groupo works well. I recently did an 83 mile day with it and it performed flawlessly.
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Old 08-21-16, 07:34 PM
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Originally Posted by drlogik View Post
Nice time capsule!

Looks like you got the chain clean, good. New tires, tube and rim strap. Don't skimp there. When you have time I would systematically thoroughly clean and repack all of the bearings. I'd start with the wheel hubs, then BB, then headset, then jockey wheels. Pull the cables and clean them and re-grease with the lightest PTFE grease you have. If it were my bike, I'd get brand new Shimano Dura Ace cables all the way around. I did for my old Pinarello and wow did it make a huge difference! They felt brand new.

Very cool bike.
I like the Gator Hardshell tires simply because I don't like servicing flats in the field. I know they are a bit heavy, but any tire is a better tire than I am a rider. In other words, if I was saving weight, my OWN spare tire would be the place to look first!

The bike was stored in a climate controlled garage it's entire life, it had just gotten a bit of dirt and dust on it and the chain grease had gotten old. I used my ultrasonic cleaner with some Simple Green to remove the old junk. I used White Lightning Easy Lube to put back on it. I have put about 26 miles on it now, so I've put it through a few paces. It has performed flawlessly, but I did run the chain off the front of the sprocket once. I may have to adjust that outer derailleur stop a bit. The last thing I want to do is scratch up the crankset. It's so purdy...
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