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Anyone want to assist/guide me building a new rear wheel?

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Anyone want to assist/guide me building a new rear wheel?

Old 09-10-16, 01:39 PM
  #1  
bikerbobbbb
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Anyone want to assist/guide me building a new rear wheel?

This is a long term project. Probably a year or so to complete. Not quite a rush since the current rear wheel is working.

I've got a 32 spoke rear wheel. I want 36 spokes for more strength. I've already got the 36 spoke rim picked out I think. That leaves getting the hub, figuring out spoke measurements (I'm thinking double butted), a cassette (but I can copy the current cassette I've got hopefully)....

Should just be speccing out parts and assembling it.


The current rear wheel, 32 spoke, has worn spokes. They keep breaking every few months. I did get all new double butted spokes, but I'm thinking I can make the new 36 spoke wheel, have that ready and working, swap it in, and then redo the 32 spoke wheel with double butted spokes. That way I've always got a working bike (very important). I'm never taking my only working wheel, disassembling it, and hoping I can redo all the spokes, true it, etc. all well enough to be able to ride it right away again. So why not get the better wheel created and working, and then redo the old one as a spare, right?
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Old 09-10-16, 02:23 PM
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If you have a rim, you need to choose the hub. Typically there are rear hubs with 130 (road) and 135 mm (mountain) spacing. You need to figure out what the spacing of the frame is and chose a hub. Then chose the spoke crossing pattern and compute the spoke length using some calculator. Pick up the spokes, nipples and gradually start building. There is a tutorial by Sheldon Brown: Wheelbuilding
Be patient and take your time.
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Old 09-11-16, 08:09 PM
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Just buy a wheel. It will be cheaper than buying the parts and building one, it will be a better wheel than you will build yourself, it won't take a year, and you'll save us about 500 posts.
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Old 09-12-16, 02:42 PM
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Just do it. But first things first:

When riders start breaking spokes, the first thought is usually, "I need more spokes". Most of the time the spokes that are breaking are the ones with least tension. A 32 spoke wheel with nice even tension is going to be more reliable than a 36 spoke wheel with uneven spoke tensions. The trick to building reliable bicycle wheels is consistent spoke tensions. Make sure that you start with a straight round rim, build up the tension real gradually and you'll be fine.
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Old 09-13-16, 07:44 PM
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Either low tension, fatigued spokes, or your rim is too unstiff for your riding style/riding weight.

Having a backup wheel is a good plan. I like.

I'd pick 3x both sides for a 36 spoke build.
Double butted if you want, but nothing less than 1.8mm diameter. Db will decrease stiffness.
There are lots of Off Center rim options these days. Might as well get one. Since you are building for reliability.

Since you've never done this before, your order of operations are as follows:

1. Buy rim, hub, nipples, and tools.
2. After rim and hub arrive, check rim for flatness and roundness. If it checks out, measure ERD at a couple points on the rim and average to get a number. https://leonard.io/edd/howtomeasure
3. Measure hub dimensions. Flange diameter is to the spoke holes.

Now that you have some reliable data, you can calculate spoke length and order. Use spocalc or online calculators. Spoke Calculator for bicycle wheels | Prowheelbuilder.com
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Old 09-13-16, 08:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Jiggle View Post
2. After rim and hub arrive, check rim for flatness and roundness. If it checks out, measure ERD at a couple points on the rim and average to get a number. https://leonard.io/edd/howtomeasure
3. Measure hub dimensions. Flange diameter is to the spoke holes.

Now that you have some reliable data, you can calculate spoke length and order. Use spocalc or online calculators. Spoke Calculator for bicycle wheels | Prowheelbuilder.com

Why not just enter the rim and hub at Lenni, will give the same result as any other spoke calc
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Old 09-14-16, 08:11 AM
  #7  
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Take awheel building Class

There are Books in Print on wheel building , of course.

Once you buy them you can use them repeatedly as a reference , reminder.





Last edited by fietsbob; 02-27-17 at 11:40 AM.
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Old 09-14-16, 10:10 AM
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Old 09-14-16, 10:02 PM
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For a great and easy reference, I recommend Roger Musson's ebook. You can buy it for $15 or so and download it immediately. It also includes instructions on building a very good truing stand. I was able to get my hands on some material and some help from a friend and put it together for about $15 or so. It's extremely sturdy and perfect for home building/truing wheels.

His explanation of the building process is very clear, and will help in avoiding some of the lacing pitfalls.

Oh, and I completely encourage you to build and maintain your own wheels. Once you get it figured out, the maintenance part will fade away as your wheels will just last and last. Just be patient with yourself, and give yourself lots of quiet time to really focus on the process. I like to carve out a couple of hours of quiet if I'm going to prep and put a wheel together. It may not take that long anymore, but not having to race against the clock is invaluable.

-Jeremy

Here is my obligatory picture of the truing stand.

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Old 09-15-16, 06:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Tunnelrat81 View Post
Oh, and I completely encourage you to build and maintain your own wheels. Once you get it figured out, the maintenance part will fade away as your wheels will just last and last. Just be patient with yourself, and give yourself lots of quiet time to really focus on the process. I like to carve out a couple of hours of quiet if I'm going to prep and put a wheel together. It may not take that long anymore, but not having to race against the clock is invaluable.
+1. And I love the trueing stand.
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Old 09-18-16, 04:35 PM
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rim, 36-spoke, would be what I've got now, Mavics cxp22 I think.... but the 36 spoke verion.
Hub could be the original one from the original wheel (I trashed it years ago though) or a different model hub. I don't have a preference as long as it works...
Cassette... Possibly the exact same cassette as I've got now. I doubt they're different between the slightly different hubs I got from old to newer rear wheel.
Spokes... double butted. I can use an online calculator to figure the exact length.


Looks like the next step would be the hub. I need to make the sure the new hub matches my bike frame correctly. When I first started posting, someone pointed out my hub is 5mm too narrow for my bike frame. How do I know what hub matches the frame? That would be the width... And there must be 36 spoke hubs (vs. 32 or something else) to match the new 36 spoke rim. And then the hub would need to match the cassette, but I think that would be standard.

Rim could be purchased now. I'm pretty sure I know what I want for that. The 32-spoke rim had decent enough reviews for what it is.

The hub would be the next thing to figure out....
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Old 09-21-16, 11:17 AM
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The hubs can be 135 ("mountain") or 130 ("road") mm. What is your bike make, model and year? You also can try measuring the frame width where the hub is with the rear wheel in it. Then let us know what it is.
If your cassette is Shimano compatible, freehubs for 8/9/10 speed are compatible. You can use a 7 speed cassette on an 8/9/10 speed freehub with a spacer.
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Old 09-21-16, 11:56 AM
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You can get a ruler at the 99 cent store for .99 and measure the rear width, can't you bikerbobbb?
Don't stretch this out for a year.
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Old 09-21-16, 12:12 PM
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If memory serves, OP is not exactly a featherweight, so a 7-speed-on-130mm or 8/9/10-speed-on-135mm hub with the extra spacer on the NDS would be a really good idea.
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Old 09-22-16, 04:31 PM
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Originally Posted by jyl View Post
Just buy a wheel. It will be cheaper than buying the parts and building one,
Only the first time. I can put a new rim on a $800 PowerTap wheel or $400 rear with a record hub for $50-$80.

it will be a better wheel than you will build yourself,
It won't unless you pay a competent builder.

it won't take a year
Wheel building only takes hours, even for the first one.
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Old 09-22-16, 04:58 PM
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Originally Posted by bikerbobbbb View Post
This is a long term project. Probably a year or so to complete. Not quite a rush since the current rear wheel is working.

I've got a 32 spoke rear wheel. I want 36 spokes for more strength. I've already got the 36 spoke rim picked out I think. That leaves getting the hub, figuring out spoke measurements (I'm thinking double butted), a cassette (but I can copy the current cassette I've got hopefully)....

Should just be speccing out parts and assembling it.


The current rear wheel, 32 spoke, has worn spokes. They keep breaking every few months. I did get all new double butted spokes, but I'm thinking I can make the new 36 spoke wheel, have that ready and working, swap it in, and then redo the 32 spoke wheel with double butted spokes. That way I've always got a working bike (very important). I'm never taking my only working wheel, disassembling it, and hoping I can redo all the spokes, true it, etc. all well enough to be able to ride it right away again. So why not get the better wheel created and working, and then redo the old one as a spare, right?
You don't necessarily need more spokes. You need stronger spokes. Most people reach for double butted spokes but those of us how are heavier and/or carry heavier loads should reach for a triple butted spoke (it wouldn't hurt the lighter guys to use triple butted spokes but that more of an uphill battle). This article from Wheel Fanyatak gives the reasons why. The one thing I don't agree with in the post is that using triple butted is the "equivalent to adding 10 spokes to the wheel". Four or even up to 8 spokes but not 10.

My rule of thumb is that it at least steps you up to the next spoke count. A 32 hole wheel built with triple butted spokes will be at least as strong as a 36 hole wheel built with double butted spokes. 36 hole wheels will be at least as strong as 40 hole wheels, etc.

These spokes are harder to find, however. And they tend have a premium price. Wheelsmith DH13 use a 2.3mm head with a 2.0mm body. Sapim Strongs are similar and Sapim Force, DT Alpine III and Pillar PSR use 2.2 to 2.3 mm heads with 1.8/2.0 bodies.

I've used DT Alpine IIIs for many, many wheels and they live up to the hype. I've also built a lot of wheels with the Pillars. Until recently the Pillars were cheaper from Bdop Cycling but Rose Bikes out of Germany is selling DT Alpine for the unheard of price of 0.45 euro per spoke. That's less then the wholesale price of the spokes in the US and almost too cheap to build with anything else. I suppose you could find some no name zinc plated spokes for less...but not by much.

If you are having spoke breakage issues, this is the best solution around. Although I don't need the strength on the front, I still build with triple butted spokes because the spoke fits in the hub tighter as explained in the Wheel Fanyatk article.

You might also want to consider Wheel Fanyatk splined spokes as well. They make tensioning much easier and they come in cool colors.
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Old 09-22-16, 05:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
Only the first time. I can put a new rim on a $800 PowerTap wheel or $400 rear with a record hub for $50-$80.



It won't unless you pay a competent builder.



Wheel building only takes hours, even for the first one.
Not for the OP. Read his prior threads.
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Old 09-22-16, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
.....

Wheel building only takes hours, even for the first one.
Not with this poster; look at his previous posts. I fully expect this to become at least a 40 post debacle, with no meaningful results.

YOU can make a wheel in a few hours, and I can, and probably MOST posters here, but I doubt he can pull it off in less than 6 months.
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Old 02-18-17, 04:19 PM
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Resurrecting my thread. I was going to make a new one, but found this old one.

https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-me...hed-right.html

The saga continues. My 32-spoke rim with a 5mm too narrow hub, still on standard spokes, is done. I bought double butted spokes but never got around to adding them.

I rely on my bike for transportation. That's why I'll build two wheels. And that's why I didn't put the double butted spokes on yet... I'll always need my bike in the morning, noon, evening, and night most days. There's maybe 4-6 hours it can be done.


The original wheel with the bike would break spokes. The bike shop gave me this current 32-spoke wheel when I asked about upgrading it to something stronger. That was about five years ago. Eventually spokes broke again. I got a cheap nipple wrench and tried to tighten spokes. That wore out nipples and didn't help truing. I discovered this site. Someone noticed my 32-spoke hub is 5mm too narrow. But I threw out the original wheel since I didn't think I'd need it. Living space is an issue. My previous plan was to build a 36-spoke wheel with the correct hub. My bike was working so I just never got to it, but I will now.

I'll keep the 32-spoke hub just to keep it, but it's 5mm to narrow for my bike so I have no use for it. Spokes are worn, so I'm done with those. 32-spoke rim has a nipple/spoke cracking through it, so that's done. Nipples might still be reusable but that's about it. Hub and nipples to keep.

I want to build two 36-spoke wheels though. I want one as backup. I can pop wheel 1 off and work on it at my leisure while wheel 2 is on the bike. The bike remains usable that way. If these two 36-spoke wheels are identical I don't have to worry about the gears being slightly off between a 32-spoke/5mm too narrow hub wheel vs. a 36-spoke/correct hub.

So.... Parts.
36-spoke rim. Those are/were available. That's doable.
Cassette -- Yes, I can reuse the one on my current wheel I think. That's salvagable then. So I only need to buy another cassette, identical to what I've got now. Current cassette has less than a year of wear on it.

Hub? I'm not sure on this one. Need help. The original hub for my bike isn't sold anymore. I threw out the original wheel with the original hub. I've got my bike specs in another thread or this one. I want to get one that will match my current cassette though (I think). I don't want to have to adjust gears/shifting later if possible.

Spokes... I probably need the hub in hand for that. I'll need to run through a formula to figure out what size spokes I need. I want double butted. I saw the arguments on here standard vs. double (and triple). Double butted sounded good. Either way, I need spokes but I don't know the measurement.

And then I have to actually put the thing together.... I've got the truing stand, etc. so I think I've got the tools. It's the ability that's not there. These will be the first wheels I've built.


So how do I find the right hub? I know what was on my bike originally if that would help. It would be a 36-spoke hub to match the 36-spoke rim. And then it should match the cassette... which involves something about the hub being free wheel or not I think. And the width of the hub... Somehow someone on one of my original threads knew my 32-spoke hub I got sold was 5mm too narrow.

Looks like it's the hub next... And I can dig out details -- my bike, original spec wheel/hub, the cassette I bought last year.
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Old 02-18-17, 04:26 PM
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So now you're going to have 2 inane threads going?
I'm out
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Old 02-18-17, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
So now you're going to have 2 inane threads going?
I'm out
Yes, a word to the wise.....
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Old 02-18-17, 05:22 PM
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Mavic cxp22
- rear, if there's a difference for just buying rims
- two
- 36 spoke
- double rimmed
- silver if possible I guess, black wouldn't be horrible.

Shimano CS-HG50 Sora 8 Speed Cassette - 11-32t (11-13-15-18-21-24-28-32)
https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...s.php?id=12017
$18
Item #: 12017-181727


Hub?
Someone mentions.... "Typically there are rear hubs with 130 (road) and 135 mm (mountain) spacing. You need to figure out what the spacing of the frame is and chose a hub."


Spokes I can figure out later, but double butted.
This is what I got before (probably the wrong side since these are for the 32-spoke/5mm too narrow hub)
https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...s.php?id=16560
Item #: 16560-37964
Description: DT Competition Spokes - 2.0 x 292 mm (Silver)
tem #: 16560-37962
Description: DT Competition Spokes - 2.0 x 290 mm (Silver)
And the nipples...
Item #: 16569-38183
Description: DT Swiss Brass Nipples - 2.0 x 12mm Silver Brass
I already bought an extra bottle of nipple lube/lock for that project.





I suppose I could walk more or actually drive my car and that would extend the time I have on the 32-spoke blown out rim before it fails.


General bike specs...
Raliegh Detour 4.5, wheel size 700c, frame size 23--, 24 speed
2009 Raleigh Detour 4.5 - BikePedia
Hubs Front: Joytech Alloy QR, Rear: Shimano RM30
Kicking myself for throwing out that hub.... The original rear wheel was 36-spoke. Oh well. It's $20-25 for a hub, and it's new.

So this must be the hub they don't make anymore. I researched previously.
Shimano RM30
https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-FH-RM...ct_top?ie=UTF8
Shimano FH-RM30 Rear Hub - 8-Speed, 36H x 135mm, Quick Release, Silver
8/9-speed Cassette
36-hole
Alloy
Bingo.... 135mm hub. I bet my 32-spoke hub is 130mm. Info matches the other poster. I must have a 130mm mountain bike hub.

So I'm looking for a 135mm hub, 8/9 speed....
And it would take my current cassette.... Shimano CS-HG50 Sora 8 Speed Cassette - 11-32t (11-13-15-18-21-24-28-32)
Rear hub too if that matters... If it takes a cassette, it would obvious it's rear hub I guess.
I'd be reusing my current skewers.
Freehub, freewheel, free-whatever... That part I'm not sure what it means. I just need to get this to match.

Hubwise, it should match the hub tool I already bought too ideally....
Here's the rear hub tool I bought before. This fits my current 32-spoke rear wheel hub/cassette. I had to get this in order to remove the cassette to get at the spokes.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Park Tool Cassette/Rotor Lockring Removal Tool - FR-5/FR-5G
no pin
"Fits Shimano®, SRAM®, SunRace®, SunTour®, Chris King® and other cassette lockrings."
This is $7.25 though. If I get two new hubs for two new 36-spoke rear wheels, if I have to buy a new hub tool and they're under $10, fine. That's not a big deal. The FR-5 one I've got now will have served it's purpose.
??? Is this lockring removal tool just for the cassette? Or does it relate to the hub too? ie I could have "any" hub, but it's the cassette that determine the lockring tool?


I've got a Shimano cassette now...
The original hub was Shimano....
So I'm probably looking for a Shimano hub.

A shimano hub?
135mm, for road bikes
rear
8/9 speed
36-hole
Very similar to the Shimano FH-RM30 that they don't make anymore. Unless I can actually find a Shimano FH-RM30, and two of those.

I wonder why they stopped making them. They would have replaced it with something... exactly the same?


On to look for Shimano hubs...
SHIMANO ? Cycling, Fishing, Rowing
Site's fudge up.... Got a bad certificate warning. Said to continue anyway. Takes me to Amazon instead. That's under bicycles, US from shimano.com

I'd also want to watch for bike parts on Amazon being shipping out of Japan or China. I got burned on that before with small parts taking forever to arrive or getting lost in shipping. Didn't matter since it was a reflector though.

Maybe universal?
https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...p?category=730
Road bike hubs, rear...
Phew... pricey.
Found the Shimano ones...
Shimano 135mm Rear Hubs
There's a disc hub. I don't know what that is, but I'd guess it's for disc brakes...
Is this my new hub?
https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...0&category=573
Shimano FH-F700 Capreo Rear Hub
Maybe not... "Requires the use of the Shimano CS-HG70 Capreo Cassette"
No it's 32 holes.
Not much selection there unless I'm searching the wrong way.

I would have thought a hub is pretty generic. Maybe 2-3 different standard models for hubs, made by different manufacturers.

Maybe Amazon?
"shimano rear hub 36h 135mm"
More here....
"Freehub" is what I don't know. Not sure what it means exactly.


I could measure my bike forks on back....
And if I orderd the hubs, I could pop my current cassette off and check that it actually fits...

This might match..
https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-XT-T7...+hub+36h+135mm
Shimano XT T780 Rear Hub - 8/10-Speed, 36H, QR, Black
$66.91
black
Ouch on the price though. I thought they'd be cheaper since it's one part. I think the whole wheel when I got the 32-spoke one was around $90 pre-built.


https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-T610-...+hub+36h+135mm
Shimano T610 Hub Rr Shi Fh-t610 Deore 36 8-10scas Sl Bulk
not much info though
$44


I found a couple like this.
https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-XT-M7...+hub+36h+135mm
but they say Shimano 9/10/SRAMF/R so I'm thinking it's wrong since I want an 8 speed cassette.
Otherwise, this one doesn't look bad. It's $55.


Random google search.... "shimano rear hub 135mm 36 hole"

https://www.bike-discount.de/en/buy/...Fc66wAodaakBLw
Shimano
LX Rear Hub FH-T670 36h black
which brings me back to this one again.
https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-T670-...ywords=FH-T670
Shimano T670 Hub Rr Shi Fh-t670 Dlx 36 8-10scas Sl Bulk
$40


Why would Shimano stop making the original hub I had?
And why keep making parts, changing them, etc...? I see parts available from non-manufacturer sites that must be the older, discontinued parts if they're not on the manufacturer's site anymore.



Now Shimano's site works...
https://bike.shimano.com
https://bike.shimano.com/content/sac...rear-hubs.html
Just one option?
https://bike.shimano.com/content/sac...fh-2400-s.html
Claris Rear Freehub (8/9-speed)
Can't quite tell from the specs...
PRODUCT SPECS
Model Number FH-2400
Series Claris
Axle Type QR
Over Locknut 130mm
Axle Length 141mm
Spoke Holes 32/36H
Contact Sealing Yes

Back to Amazon "shimano FH-2400 36h 135mm"

Maybe I found it... Is this my new hub?
Black...
https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-2400-...2400+36h+135mm
Shimano 2400 Hub Rr Shi Fh-2400 Claris 36h 8-10scas Bk Bulk
$22
- black

Or silver...
https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-2400-...2400+36h+135mm
Shimano 2400 Hub Rr Shi Fh-2400 Claris 36h 8-10scas Sl Bulk
$22
- silver


So what's the difference between this Claris line (more current?) and the Deore ones (more expensive)?



I'm getting burned out for searching. I've got more info than before though. It's more effort to track down a hub than I thought.
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Old 02-18-17, 05:35 PM
  #23  
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2011 Mavic CXP 22 700c Road Bike Rim 36H Black | Bikewagon.com
2011 Mavic CXP 22 700c Road Bike Rim 36H Black
$30
Condition: New OEM
SKU: 239-226-11924836
UPC: 080694086269
... but not in stock.


Mavic Road Rims 700C - CXP22 Black at Raleigh
MAV081 is 36h, black


Stumbled across this...
https://www.bikerumor.com/2011/12/07...eavier-riders/
I suppose I could get different rims. This page mentioned eyelets.
"But depending on how hard the guys ride, even our strongest wheel systems will have a finite lifespan."
So if the wheels/rims are consumable... I just keep building new wheels every... five years or so when the rims wear out?

Still Mavic, but these have eyelets...
Mavic 2012 A319 Alloy Rim - 700c, 36H, Black MSW
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Old 02-18-17, 06:01 PM
  #24  
bikerbobbbb
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Univeral, rims
https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...p?category=856
700c, Mavic
https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...p?category=858

I could just stick with Mavic but get a different model if the cxp22 one isn't available... plus I could get eyelets then so it's even stronger.

https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...2&category=858
- double eyelets
$80 though. Ouch.

Tire width would be a concern, to match what I've got now, or have it be a little wider. My current 32-spoke Mavic cxp22 always seems a little narrow for my tires.


Silver would match the front rim. Everything on my bike's been going black though. Probably doesn't matter if front and back rims are mismatched silver and black.


Hey, hey... Specs on the Mavic cxp22
https://www.tech-mavic.com/tech-mavic...ucts/2_109.pdf
- Says single eyelet. I don't think mine actually have eyelets.


https://shop.mavic.com/en-us/road-an...hlon/rims.html

https://shop.mavic.com/en-us/cxp-pro-j23800.html
CXP PRO
36h
$85
Recommended tire widths: 19 to 28 mm
-- not sure how that compares to what I've got now.... I want fatter tires for sure.


https://shop.mavic.com/en-us/a-319-j24500.html
Silver 36 holes
Recommended tire widths: 28 to 47 mm
Double Eyelet
A 319
$54.95
This feels on the right track, working from Mavics site...

https://shop.mavic.com/en-us/open-elite-j24300.html
OPEN ELITE
Recommended tire widths: 19 to 28 mm
Single eyelet
Silver 36 holes


https://shop.mavic.com/en-us/a-719-j24400.html
A 719
$84.95
Double Eyelet
Recommended tire widths: 28 to 47 mm
ilver 36 holes
Double Eyelet
Recommended tire widths: 19 to 28 mm still narrow?
??? says Black 32 holes in the description but the top has 36 holes.





https://shop.mavic.com/en-us/open-pro-c-j24200.html
OPEN PRO C
$79.95
S


https://shop.mavic.com/en-us/open-pro-t-j24100.html
32h


That would be...
Mavic
double walled
36 hole
double eyelet
black or silver


hm...
mavic a719 36h

https://www.amazon.com/Mavic-2016-Cl...mavic+a719+36h
Mavic 2016 A 719 Clincher Road Bicycle Rim (Black - 36H)
$79.13 + $3.99 shipping


If I'm spending that much on rims, and not sticking with cxp22, I could look at other brands. This just happened to come up on Amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/DT-Swiss-TK54...rds=mavic+a719
DT Swiss TK540 Rim - 36H, 700C/29er, Black
$73.09
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Old 02-18-17, 07:49 PM
  #25  
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J....F'ing Chri.....
Just buy something and be done with it.
https://www.rei.com/product/770555/d...00c-rear-wheel
https://www.rei.com/product/770557/d...0c-front-wheel
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