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Can you name this brake part?

Old 10-23-16, 01:05 PM
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VitoPaparazzi
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Can you name this brake part?

Can you identify the name of the part in the photo?
What is it called?
Is this a cantilever-lever-to-V-Brake adapter?

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Old 10-25-16, 05:15 AM
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dabac
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Originally Posted by VitoPaparazzi View Post
Can you identify the name of the part in the photo?
What is it called?

Maybe a pivoting cable stop.





Originally Posted by VitoPaparazzi View Post
Is this a cantilever-lever-to-V-Brake adapter?

No.


Cantis need a cable stop. Cable stops should sit as low as possible to limit the possibility of brake chatter due to fork flexing during braking. A traditional cable stop can't be fitted there and still leave room enough for the yoke/transverse cable. That gadget doubles as both cable stop and replaces the transverse cable with a link cable. A safer option since a transverse cable set-up at main cable failure might snag a knobbly tire and cause an OTB.
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Old 10-25-16, 06:24 AM
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Might be a LINK WIRE CARRIER
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Old 10-25-16, 06:54 AM
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Wilfred Laurier
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It is similar to a product marketed by Cannondale BITD called the 'Force 40'. IIRC, it was a mega PITA to set up and offered little-to-no improvement over a standard yoke/straddle cable or shimano-style link wire and tube assembly... except for, as mentioned above, requiring less room above the brake for frames where that is a limitation, such as full suspension or very small frames. Not going OTB in the event of a cable failure is also a plus, but that was extremely rare on properly maintained bikes.
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Old 10-25-16, 08:07 AM
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Originally Posted by VitoPaparazzi View Post
Can you identify the name of the part in the photo?
What is it called?
Is this a cantilever-lever-to-V-Brake adapter?

Hi VitoPaparazzi,

I believe those are "roller-cam" brakes which are very similar to cantilever brakes. I think the part you are asking about is called the "roller cam". (However, I'm not 100% sure.)

Kind regards, RoadLight
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Old 10-25-16, 08:13 AM
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Yeah nah, roller cam brakes are a whole other thing/s.
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Old 10-25-16, 08:16 AM
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Originally Posted by RoadLight View Post
Hi VitoPaparazzi,

I believe those are "roller-cam" brakes which are very similar to cantilever brakes. I think the part you are asking about is called the "roller cam". (However, I'm not 100% sure.)

Kind regards, RoadLight
No, it's not a roller cam. It simply a different way of handling the straddle cable on a cantilever brake.

Take a look here to see what a roller cam brake looks like
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Old 10-25-16, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier View Post
It is similar to a product marketed by Cannondale BITD called the 'Force 40'. IIRC, it was a mega PITA to set up and offered little-to-no improvement over a standard yoke/straddle cable or shimano-style link wire and tube assembly... except for, as mentioned above, requiring less room above the brake for frames where that is a limitation, such as full suspension or very small frames. Not going OTB in the event of a cable failure is also a plus, but that was extremely rare on properly maintained bikes.
This is the correct answer. Good job Wilfred! I'll add that it was an attempt to increase the "power" of a canti brake. But that increased the pad rub potential because, as we all know, when you increase the leverage you reduce something else. In this case the pad movement per lever movement took the hit. So to not have levers bottom out the pads are brought in closer to the rim. Lastly, to drive Wilfred's point about being a PITA to work with, you've added a third pivot with all it's friction (and changing friction with grime, remember where the rear is located- right in the line of fire above the rear tire). Some of these also had their own spring so now you had to balance three springs... I talked a number of customers into removing their Force 40s and go to conventional cable hanger stops. They all had far better rides even though on paper their brakes weren't "as powerful". Just one more example where mere numbers don't make the ride better. Andy.
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