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Park FR 1.2 or 1.3 for Centerlock disk brake rotors?

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Park FR 1.2 or 1.3 for Centerlock disk brake rotors?

Old 01-22-17, 09:32 PM
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robo
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Park FR 1.2 or 1.3 for Centerlock disk brake rotors?

Hi - I'm a bit confused about the tools needed to safely install/remove Shimano centerlock disc brake rotors.

I have a Park FR-1.2 freewheel remover in my tool drawer. I'd actually forgotten this and while at my local bike coop picked up a FR-1.3, which the guy at the cash register said would work to remove Centerlock rotors. But I can't find anything to cooroborate this on the Internet - it seems that the correct tool for the disc rotors is actually the Park FR-5 casette lockring tool.

Does anyone know if the FR-1.2 or 1.3 freewheel remover is usable for this purpose? I know "just try it" but I don't want to damage the rotor lockring by torquing on it with something that doesn't quite fit... Also, I don't want to open the package on the 1.3 if it's not going to be what I need!

Thanks
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Old 01-22-17, 11:05 PM
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The freewheel removers usually fit cassette lockrings (and by extension, centerlock lockrings) after they've been in use for a few years in a shop setting; unfortunately, the splines are much shallower on the FW remover versus the cassette lock ring tool. Typically, they won't even fit aluminum Shimano lockrings.

The splines are slightly smaller on the freewheel remover, so only use it with steel lockrings, if you decide to do it, I guess? For *****-and-giggles, I just tried to put my not-used-as-much-as-a-shop's freewheel tool through a centerlock lockring, and it won't even come close to fitting the bore.
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Old 01-23-17, 12:35 PM
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Thanks wschruba - that's the info I was looking for. Might as well get the right tool for the job.
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Old 01-23-17, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by robo View Post
Thanks wschruba - that's the info I was looking for. Might as well get the right tool for the job.
This is a good attitude to have--

"Buy once, cry once"

(not that I don't advocate making tools, but this just isn't one of those cases, unless you have a mill. And if you did, you're probably not worried about $7.)

If you can find it, I prefer the one without a guide pin, since the whole assembly can then be secured by a QR to prevent slipping, as with some [very old] cassette hubs or super tight lockrings. If not, a 4.5-5mm drift punch can be held with a pair of vise-grips, and an engineer's hammer used to drive the pin out from the rear (side with wrench flats) of the tool, resting it spline side down over the open jaws of a vise.

On the subject of useful modifications (and assuming you had access to a machine shop/tools), the center bore can be drilled out to the same thickness of the business end, and chucked in a lathe; the inside can then be turned down (or out, as the case may be) to provide clearance over a QR on the bike. Prior to the availability of such a tool from Abbey Bike Works/Park, that was the only avenue to a great time-saver in a shop/event setting.
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Old 01-23-17, 03:57 PM
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Interesting. I had no intention of modifying the tool though, as I have no expertise or equipment for doing so for a tool like that.

I do actually already own one with a center pin, but the wheel I need it for is a solid axle Shimano Alfine hub, so the pin is no good.
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Old 01-23-17, 04:10 PM
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In which case, any tool that is sold without the guide pin will have clearance over a solid axle without modification.
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