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Seatpost is tight fit on NOS? build Cinelli Super Corsa

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Seatpost is tight fit on NOS? build Cinelli Super Corsa

Old 03-10-17, 11:52 AM
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WolfRyder 
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Seatpost is tight fit on NOS? build Cinelli Super Corsa

I dropped a decent amount of coin on this and tried to ensure a good pack job. By paying extra for packing and communicating with the Seller the importance of a professional pack job. (See photos for what I got)-Pretty sure he just did a home job on it.

So there was some paint chip damage and the seatpost cavity was exposed.

The seatpost fit is a little tight for some reason. Could something have been damaged during shipping or disassembly?

I didn't want to scratch my post, but it is tight with another post also. Should I just hone it a little? It is NOS? build I think so there shouldn't be any crud in the cavity.

Whats the best tool for that?
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Old 03-10-17, 12:52 PM
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Geez, that's criminal. Would not have cost much more $ or time to do the job right. But...you've got what you've got. Use a set of calipers to check the internal sizing at several points around the circumference of the seat tube. My Cinelli's both had 27.2 seat posts, but yours may be different.

Look closely at the front point of the seat cluster, the one that sticks up in the air and rests against the seatpost when installed. It may be slightly bent-can't tell from your picture. If so, it can be gently straightened using a mallet and punch. If you don't have a punch, a small socket extention may work. Be careful and take your time. If you're not competely comfortable with the process, go to a professional.
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Old 03-10-17, 12:52 PM
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Couple of things: 1. Make sure you have the right diameter post--Cinelli has changed over the years using seat tubes of different wall thickness. 2. Once you have the right diameter post, try a cheapo or used post to tighten in the tube and make sure it does really fit correctly. An out of round seat lug may not be a big problem. You don't want to hear this, but lugged steel frames except for a very few have an almost unavoidable tendency to scratch seatposts. Either get a titanium post or get over it.
3. Use a grape hone in a hand held drill to polish the inside of the seat tube. It will NOT completely eliminate a tendency to scratch posts but will reduce it.
Hope some of this helps.
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Old 03-10-17, 01:01 PM
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Is it out of round?

I have a few 27.2 posts , they are not 27.200, there is some variation..

Got any Measuring tools ? like a Caliper that reads to the 4th decimal point?

you might clean up any burrs left from slotting the seat tube.. with some hand files..





...

Last edited by fietsbob; 03-10-17 at 01:05 PM.
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Old 03-10-17, 01:06 PM
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If it was built but never used(I guess that NOS, just in a built way), then there would be crud since it was built however many years ago and grease hardens with time.

Pretty bad pack job.
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Old 03-10-17, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by rccardr View Post
Geez, that's criminal. Would not have cost much more $ or time to do the job right. But...you've got what you've got. Use a set of calipers to check the internal sizing at several points around the circumference of the seat tube. My Cinelli's both had 27.2 seat posts, but yours may be different.

Look closely at the front point of the seat cluster, the one that sticks up in the air and rests against the seatpost when installed. It may be slightly bent-can't tell from your picture. If so, it can be gently straightened using a mallet and punch. If you don't have a punch, a small socket extention may work. Be careful and take your time. If you're not competely comfortable with the process, go to a professional.
Yeah I want to make sure the seat cluster isn't bent. Just eyeing it before it seemed alright, but not totally sure. I wouldn't feel comfortable taking mallet and punch to it myself, if it came to that.
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Old 03-10-17, 01:32 PM
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What about using one of these brake cylinder hones on it?
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Old 03-10-17, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Feldman View Post
You don't want to hear this, but lugged steel frames except for a very few have an almost unavoidable tendency to scratch seatposts. Either get a titanium post or get over it.
3. Use a grape hone in a hand held drill to polish the inside of the seat tube. It will NOT completely eliminate a tendency to scratch posts but will reduce it.
Not to hijack the thread or anything... But does anyone know of other methods to avoid scratching seatposts in lugged steel frames? I have a nice new frame that I'm building up with a nice new aluminum seatpost, and I'd rather not scratch the heck out of it. I tested a crappy old post in the frame and it came out battle scarred!
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Old 03-10-17, 03:53 PM
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Two things cause most scratches and they are inherent in the build of most lugged steel frames. One is the brazing gas relief hole drilled in the surface of the seat tube and facing back towards the post--there's no way to drill it except from the outside of the tube in before the seat tube/top tube joint is brazed, and meticulous cleaning of the inside of the tube will minimize scratching but probably not completely eliminate it. The other source is the slot in the back of the seat lug which is of course necessary for the lug to tighten the post in place. Again, it can be minimized but never totally eliminated. Some high end artisan built frames are finished so well that they don't scratch the post. Once in awhile, I see a bike (I'm a working bike mechanic) where the inside of the tube has been cleaned too zealously and the post has incurable slippage which is way worse than any scratch! Unless your bike is built by someone like Lyon, Sachs, or Bishop you will probably have a few post scratches. Please learn to get over it as except for super-premium workmanship, all the cures are worse than the disease.
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Old 03-10-17, 03:54 PM
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Originally Posted by WolfRyder View Post
What about using one of these brake cylinder hones on it?
Those are great when used in moderation. They don't fix everything, believe me.
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Old 03-10-17, 03:55 PM
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Another thing you all probably don't want to hear--European frames are much worse than US or Asian made frames for this problem. How do you keep from scratching a seatpost in an Italian frame? Put the post in an American or Japanese one! 40+ years as a working mechanic and almost 50 of riding have enlightened me--seatpost scratches are an emotional problem of the rider, not a mechanical problem of the bike.
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Old 03-10-17, 04:37 PM
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Nothing to add to the conversation, but that is a perfectly acceptable packing job, to me. I would have removed the bottle cages from the bike, but it doesn't look like they were damaged; there's a bit of foam that is usually placed around the rear brake caliper to protect it/the front rim from each other, but again, doesn't look like there is any damage. What you got, minus maybe a couple of pieces of foam/cardboard, is how upwards of 90% of the bikes on the market are shipped to shops...were you expecting the whole bike wrapped in pipe foam?

Vintage frames were delivered in terrible condition, compared to frames now. It was both expected, and normal, to have to chase/face the bottom bracket, face/ream the head tube, hone/ream the seat tube to specifications, and align the derailleur hanger (if present).
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Old 03-10-17, 06:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Feldman View Post
Two things cause most scratches and they are inherent in the build of most lugged steel frames. One is the brazing gas relief hole drilled in the surface of the seat tube and facing back towards the post--there's no way to drill it except from the outside of the tube in before the seat tube/top tube joint is brazed, and meticulous cleaning of the inside of the tube will minimize scratching but probably not completely eliminate it. The other source is the slot in the back of the seat lug which is of course necessary for the lug to tighten the post in place. Again, it can be minimized but never totally eliminated. Some high end artisan built frames are finished so well that they don't scratch the post. Once in awhile, I see a bike (I'm a working bike mechanic) where the inside of the tube has been cleaned too zealously and the post has incurable slippage which is way worse than any scratch! Unless your bike is built by someone like Lyon, Sachs, or Bishop you will probably have a few post scratches. Please learn to get over it as except for super-premium workmanship, all the cures are worse than the disease.
Thats all good info I appreciate it, I do see a lot of scratched Italian seatposts thats for sure.
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Old 03-10-17, 06:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Feldman View Post
Those are great when used in moderation. They don't fix everything, believe me.
Ok I just want to make sure I don't take off too much of anything when I hone it.
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Old 03-10-17, 07:04 PM
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Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
Nothing to add to the conversation, but that is a perfectly acceptable packing job, to me. .were you expecting the whole bike wrapped in pipe foam?
.
I totally disagree and have had bikes shipped to me before. This was worst job on my most expensive bike, and yes absolutely, I was expecting the Frameset (not whole bike) to be wrapped in pipe foam. Thats what I paid for.

Best pack job i got is last one pictured, and bike isn't even worth half of the Cinelli. Everything was wrong with this job, surprised the damage wasn't worse. Handle bars were in wrong position. The after thought bubblewrap and poorly placed sliding thin cardboard strips did nothing. All kinds of play within the box as well.

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...ike-101-a.html
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Old 03-10-17, 07:06 PM
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I used an adjustable reamer, I was shaving out 0.1mm of wall thickness to make my 27.0 RB1 take a 27.2 seat post ,

working slowly with cutting oil the seat tube bore was smooth when I was Done,

and as I had the post in hand, and test fitting till it 'just' fit, it now fits with very little distortion. tightening the Bolt.

worked with the frame in the repair stand so pointing the open end downward.. chips stuck in the oil & didn't go down the seat tube..


Bring your bike , to my LBS i can maybe do the work you need, for you..



...

Last edited by fietsbob; 03-11-17 at 11:03 AM.
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Old 03-10-17, 07:27 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
I used an adjustable reamer, I was shaving out 0.1mm of wall thickness to make my 27.0 RB1 take a 27.2 seat post ,

working slowly with cutting oil the seat tube bore was smooth when I was Done,

and as I had the post in hand, and test fitting till it 'just' fit, it now fits with very little distortion. tightening the Bolt.

worked with the frame in the repair stand so pointing the open end downward.. chips stuck in the oil & didn't go down the seat tube..




...
Yeah I'm not looking to ream anything on this jobee, (hoping it is just a minor fix) and want the size of seatpost cavity to stay the same.

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Old 03-10-17, 08:49 PM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
If it was built but never used(I guess that NOS, just in a built way), then there would be crud since it was built however many years ago and grease hardens with time.
I am hoping it is that and I can just hone it a little and be done with it.
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Old 03-10-17, 09:39 PM
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Originally Posted by WolfRyder View Post
I am hoping it is that and I can just hone it a little and be done with it.
A reamer is arguably better than a hone because it will only remove material from the "high" spots, while a hone will remove material indiscriminately.
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Old 03-10-17, 10:00 PM
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I don't want to remove any material on inside of cavity if possible. I want to go conservative first. What is least invasive technique to rub/clean slightly scrape, out the cavity and see if the post will fit ok? This does look like a NOS build, so maybe a slight working of post cavity is normal to break it in.
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Old 03-11-17, 12:39 AM
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If it was me, I'd carefully eyeball inside the cluster, paying particular attention to how parallel the slot is, and whether the point at the front is bent, and take a small 6" steel ruler and drag it around the inner circumference, feeling for any high spots.

I'd lightly run a rat-tail around it, and follow with a bit of emery cloth around my finger, working to take the corners off the slot and breather hole.
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Old 03-11-17, 10:14 AM
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Work a half round file around the inside of the seat tube. It will only remove protrusions and not the ID unless you really work at it. You can feel and see the spots it rides on.
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Old 03-11-17, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Slash5 View Post
Work a half round file around the inside of the seat tube. It will only remove protrusions and not the ID unless you really work at it. You can feel and see the spots it rides on.

Ever used a file in your life?




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Old 03-11-17, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Ever used a file in your life?
Yep, once or twice.
Try filing the inside of a smooth chrome moly tube with one finger to provide pressure and let me know how you make out.
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Old 03-11-17, 11:15 AM
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Don't over due this whole operation with files, brake cylinder hones, reamers,,, what not.
Start out with emery clothe by hand. Please, no power tools.
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