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Compressors and Accesories

Old 03-13-17, 12:30 PM
  #1  
TimothyH
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Compressors and Accesories

I really need one for general use in my garage apart from bikes but I'll soon need a compressor for tubeless tires and am hoping to have a discussion or get some feedback.
Models and brands? Which one's to avoid?

Accessories such as a presta head with gauge?

How do you have yours set up in the shop? Cable hung from the ceiling, etc?

Not looking to run a roofing business and don't need commercial duty. I'd like to keep the whole thing under $200.


-Tim-
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Old 03-13-17, 12:50 PM
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What do you want a compressor for (in addition to tires)? If you just need to inflate tires, Specialized sells a tank inflating tubeless tires for $55. It's cheap and more reliable than any compressor. Bontrager sells the Flashcharger pump, which is great for seating, and kinda crappy as a pump.

If you also want to inflate car tires, run power tools (nail guns), something with a ~5 gal tank is probably best. Figure spending ~$120 for a compressor then another $50 on accessories.
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Old 03-13-17, 01:17 PM
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I have a garage compressor for tools and inflating car tires. I originally used it for bikes and quickly learn how crappy it was at that task, bought a floor pump for the bikes and it works much easier and quicker. Compressor was too fast which made it very difficult to get the pressure I wanted.

Never messed with tubeless tires so it may have merit for seating, but would not use it for weekly top ups.
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Old 03-13-17, 01:46 PM
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Check Harbor Freight.
I use mine to keep the car tires topped off, and to power my nail guns.
For bike use, inflates tires(takes practice to not blow tires off rims, or pinch tubes), and I use a the air to blow off and dry chains after cleaning in OMS. And to blow off water after a wash.
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Old 03-13-17, 01:47 PM
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TimothyH:

As stated, what all do you want to use it for? A pancake model is fine for small jobs and filling tires but can quickly run out of air and runs and runs to keep up.. If you plan to use any sanders, nail guns, blowing off a chain, drying your bike, car tires, etc a double hotdog may be in order. Like computer hard drives, go for one that is a little bigger than you think you need. The extra air capacity and pressure will not go to waste. Oh, they are awesome for blowing out a garage!

I have a Porter Cable double hotdog that's going on 10 years old and still operates like new after two home renovations. I'd stick with a reputable brand and stay away from "bargain" compressors.

This one, and it's on sale at Home Depot for half off at $107. You can't beat that!! I paid almost $200 bucks for mine years ago as I recall.
Porter-Cable 4 Gal. Stack Tank Electric Air Compressor-PCFP02040 - The Home Depot

Also, Flexeel air hoses (100 footer) are sweet and a lot easier to handle (and lighter) than the red rubber air hoses...especially in cool/cold weather. I coil the hose on a hose rack on the wall in my garage.


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Last edited by drlogik; 03-13-17 at 01:59 PM.
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Old 03-13-17, 01:51 PM
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Topeak Joe Blow Booster.

Itll pump tube tires and set the bead for tubless tires. Long no kink hose, 1 head for all valves, and a solid base.
Nope, it isnt an air compressor, but it is a bike tire pump speficially for...pumping bike tires.
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Old 03-13-17, 02:11 PM
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I have an old 4 HP 25 Gal craftsman (devilbiss made) for the last 25 years. Don't know the CFM but it has run everything I've thrown with minimal recovery time. Can be wired 110v or 220v (have 220 in the garage). Mostly it runs the impact and blowing stuff out/off now days. To do bike tires I just set the regulator to what I want (normally 110 psi) and use a $1 presta adaptor. On the schrader tires I just use my air gauge and fill with small bursts. If I did it over again I would NOT get an oilless, it's very noisy, and I would get a vertical tank to take up less floor space.
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Old 03-13-17, 09:59 PM
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Originally Posted by drlogik View Post
This one, and it's on sale at Home Depot for half off at $107. You can't beat that!! I paid almost $200 bucks for mine years ago as I recall.
Porter-Cable 4 Gal. Stack Tank Electric Air Compressor-PCFP02040 - The Home Depot

Also, Flexeel air hoses (100 footer) are sweet and a lot easier to handle (and lighter) than the red rubber air hoses...especially in cool/cold weather. I coil the hose on a hose rack on the wall in my garage.


Thanks for this.

3.4 SCFM @ 90 psig and 4.9 @ 40 is pretty good. The $120 pancake compressors can't do that much.

The ability to use an air ratchet would be icing on the cake.

I might have to buy this.


-Tim-

Last edited by TimothyH; 03-13-17 at 10:05 PM.
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Old 03-14-17, 03:11 AM
  #9  
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I have a pancake Dewalt from Home Depot. I bought it to power nail guns--which it does a great job. It works fine for seating tubeless beads using a Schrader air chuck with a presta adaptor on the wheel's valve. It has to turn on and refill for airing off freshly rinsed bikes though (I use it to dry the chain links and around disc brakes, etc.) Blows off old mtb handlebar grips nicely using a rubber tipped nozzle. I forgot to look at Harbor Freight first and could've saved a few bucks.
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Old 03-14-17, 08:30 AM
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#2 thing to think about- How noisy is it! Especially if its in the same room you work in. I've had small compressors that make a tolerable hum to ear piercing BWWAAHHHHHH. Plug it in before you buy.

-SP
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Old 03-14-17, 08:34 AM
  #11  
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For just inflating tires, there is no reason to have a tank;

https://www.amazon.com/Decker-ASI300.../dp/B000IE0YIQ

Set pressure desired, connect, turn on.
It shuts off at pressure setting.
No waiting around for a tank to fill.
(You will need a presta adapter.)
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Old 03-14-17, 09:01 AM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by Shimagnolo View Post
For just inflating tires, there is no reason to have a tank;

https://www.amazon.com/Decker-ASI300.../dp/B000IE0YIQ

Set pressure desired, connect, turn on.
It shuts off at pressure setting.
No waiting around for a tank to fill.
(You will need a presta adapter.)
I was going to say this one https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005CMHUA4/ no idea if it's better than the Black & Decker but I've been using it since 2014. Filling up bike tires doesn't need all that much.
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Old 03-14-17, 09:05 AM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
I was going to say this one https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005CMHUA4/ no idea if it's better than the Black & Decker but I've been using it since 2014. Filling up bike tires doesn't need all that much.
First I've seen of this model.
Are the power cords and air hoses detachable?
My only complaint on the B&D is that both are very short, and not detachable, so putting longer ones on it is not a simple task.
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Old 03-14-17, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Shimagnolo View Post
First I've seen of this model.
Are the power cords and air hoses detachable?
My only complaint on the B&D is that both are very short, and not detachable, so putting longer ones on it is not a simple task.
Not detachable. But the hose is 2-3 feet and the power cord plenty long. I have 3 bikes in the hallway and one around the corner, and I can reach them all just fine.
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Old 03-14-17, 11:14 AM
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I've used this little Husky inflator from Home Depot for a couple of years. It is hard to over inflate a bike tire with it, and it is effortless. One caution however; the cylinder head gets very warm after a couple of tires.
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Old 03-14-17, 11:32 AM
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I've had various compressors over the years. Little pancake jobs are nice. They fit in the car trunk & can generally store enough air to inflate several tires. But, lets talk about hoses. I used to think the heavy, reinforced, expensive rubber hoses were the way to go. But, after a few years the things start to dry rot & crack. I've got a cheap, plastic, orange fluorescent hose my dad gave me about 35 years ago that's still going strong! I don't know what they're made of but, the lightweight plastic hoses last longer.
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Old 03-14-17, 12:30 PM
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I have a Campbell-Hausfeld 1-gallon "pancake" compressor I got at Walmart for about $60. I use it mostly for topping up car tires and air-blowing parts to dry them and it would be plenty strong to seat tubeless tires. I will reach 125 psi and has a regulator and delivery pressure gauge so you can set the pressure you want. The small air tank bleeds down quickly and it has to run a lot to keep up.

I bought it for it's small size and ease of storage and it's main negative is that it is NOISY. I run it in the garage or outside only.
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Old 03-14-17, 01:07 PM
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Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
I really need one for general use in my garage apart from bikes but I'll soon need a compressor for tubeless tires and am hoping to have a discussion or get some feedback.
Models and brands? Which one's to avoid?

Accessories such as a presta head with gauge?

How do you have yours set up in the shop? Cable hung from the ceiling, etc?

Not looking to run a roofing business and don't need commercial duty. I'd like to keep the whole thing under $200.


-Tim-
I've had a few different compressors over the years (used to be in construction). When I needed a small one for my home shop, one thing I really wanted was for it to be QUIET.

For that reason, I wanted an oil-lubed one, NOT an oil-less (which are really loud)

I went with this the Makita MAC700R:
Makita 2.6 Gal. 2 HP Portable Electrical Hot Dog Air Compressor-MAC700 - The Home Depot

WAY quieter than any small oil-less compressor I have heard (which can be pretty loud). Quiet enough to have a normal conversation while it is running. Due to the cast iron cylinder head, it is a bit heavy for the amount of air it moves, but since I am not dragging it to job sites, I don't really care.

I was actually very surprised at how well built this was for the money.

It is not going to keep up with air sanders and sprayers, but I use it for finish nailers, and I can use a framing nailer with it if I am not in a big rush. Also good for blowing dust off work-spaces and tools, and would be more than adequate for filling tires and setting tubeless beads.

Did I say it was pretty quiet?

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Old 03-14-17, 02:41 PM
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I have used a Craftsman 1.5HP 3 Gal for years. On bikes... It works great to take mountain bike grips off. I also use it to put in golf grips, although I have not done both sports at the same time.

John
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Old 03-15-17, 05:08 AM
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I frequently use my compressor. Makes airing up tires quick and easy. Freewheel removal is easy....one or two blips with the impact wrench and the free wheel is off. Also use it to blow dry washed parts. Have painted a bike with it and used it with low pressure for my airbrush for touch ups.

Would I go out and spend $200-$300 for one? No. But for $20 (less than the cost of a floor pump) at a yard sale last year it is well worth the money
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Old 03-15-17, 09:39 AM
  #21  
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I have a 5hp Craftsman compressor in my garage. It's the biggest thing I can run without 220v, as I have no 220v in my garage. (I still need 220v for my welder and plasma cutter, but since those are occasional use, I run a monster extension chord from the house.)


But even with a compressor this size, it just barely cuts it for automotive air tools. It will run everything fine, but with certain tools that use a lot of air, it can't keep up the way a big stand-up style compressor can. This is never an issue for an impact gun, air ratchet, air-saw, pneumatic hammer, paint sprayer, or a nailer. But if you try to use an air sander, die grinder, pneumatic cut-off tool, air nibbler, or other tool that demands a lot of air, you'll be waiting more than working. And a compressor the size of mine is quite loud, constant running will not make you happy while you work.


None of this stuff is particularly needed for bicycles, but if you plan to do a lot of automotive stuff, I'd say go big. If you have 220v, go for it. Like I said, a 5hp compressor will run everything, but it's not enough for constant use with certain tools.


Another tip, to get the most from your compressor, is to get Milton "V" type fittings. They flow more air, and the female end can accept standard air fittings OR the V type. This will greatly help tools like air-impacts or ratchets. It will give them much more power. I had a Snap-on 3/8" impact that barely ran before I switched to the V type fittings; now it's perfect. For some others, like a die grinder, it may run too fast for your liking. But I use the V fittings on about 2/3ds of my air tools.


Also, a garage compressor set up is really not complete without some plumbing, (3/4" copper is good). You'll need a good regulator and water separator. Some folks add an automatic oiler to protect their air tools, I just oil my tools manually, (you don't want this if you'll ever run a spray gun). A hose reel is a great addition, Cox and Hannay make the best. But most important, is you need "drops" to allow any condensed water to collect and be drained. Since you need to drain the tank on your compressor on a regular basis, there are also devices that do this automatically.


Finally, keep in mind that these days, most pro mechanics are switching from air tools to battery tools for most power tools. While the battery tools are heavier, they are more convenient, and they are getting more powerful and lighter every year. The big downside of the battery tools is that good ones are hugely expensive. The rechargeable replacements for the tools that draw huge air, (like die grinders,) will do the same for battery life, but a chorded electric tool is also an option. But on the plus side, since so many mechanics are switching to these battery tools, there are plenty of lightly used high end air tools on eBay.
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Old 03-15-17, 10:01 AM
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Thread creep here...

For those of you talking about filling tires, that's not what this is about.

My primary need is a compressor to install tubeless tires. This requires a very high volume, high pressure shot of air to "blow" the tire onto the bead seat. This procedure is specific to tubeless tires and has nothing to do with topping off or inflating tires. I have a hand pump for that.

While I appreciate the detailed comments, I don't need 5HP, 220volt or copper plumbing. Again, I'd like to keep everything under $200.


-Tim-

Last edited by TimothyH; 03-15-17 at 10:13 AM.
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Old 03-15-17, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
Thread creep here...

For those of you talking about filling tires, that's not what this is about.

My primary need is a compressor to install tubeless tires. This requires a very high volume, high pressure shot of air to "blow" the tire onto the bead seat. This procedure is specific to tubeless tires and has nothing to do with topping off or inflating tires. I have a hand pump for that.
Are you talking about automotive type tires?
I have a cheap 100psi 2gal compressor that I have used to mount tubeless tires on my motorcycle.
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Old 03-15-17, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
Thread creep here...

For those of you talking about filling tires, that's not what this is about.

My primary need is a compressor to install tubeless tires. This requires a very high volume, high pressure shot of air to "blow" the tire onto the bead seat. This procedure is specific to tubeless tires and has nothing to do with topping off or inflating tires. I have a hand pump for that.

While I appreciate the detailed comments, I don't need 5HP, 220volt or copper plumbing. Again, I'd like to keep everything under $200.


-Tim-

Your original post said: "I really need one for general use in my garage apart from bikes" which is why I tried to educate you on what a real compressor can and can not do. The exact compressor I have in my garage is no longer sold by Craftsman, but could easily be purchased for well under $200 second hand. I think it was about $350 new, but I bought mine used for $100 on Craig's List, and it's lasted about 10 years so far. Compressors come up all the time of Craig's List. It's also about the minimum needed for successfully running automotive air tools, which is what comes to my mind when thinking about "general use" of a compressor. I would imagine you could get away with less if your minimum criteria is simply to seat a tubeless tire and inflate things; how much less I could not say.
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Old 03-15-17, 12:01 PM
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Just for reference, my compressor looks something like this, but is 5hp and runs on 110v:





Sears sold tons of these, so it's not that hard to find one used.
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