Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Changing Out Old Chain. Lube ?

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Changing Out Old Chain. Lube ?

Old 05-13-17, 05:54 PM
  #1  
Scooty Puff Jr
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Scooty Puff Jr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: St. Petersburg, Fl
Posts: 935

Bikes: I'm a Flatbar Guy

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 355 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Changing Out Old Chain. Lube ?

2016 Fuji Crosstown 1.1, as of today 6507 miles.

Had a slow leak on a 60 mile ride today, second flat on the same Marathon Plus tire (another story), decided to just tear the bike down for the summer, since I needed to change the tube, and tune/clean it. Since I cleaned the cassette and pulled the triple chank gear side and cleaned it as well, figured since I have a new chain I might as well replace it.

I've heard to not to lube a new Shimano chain until it needs it, but should I put a light smear of lube on the cassette and crank, or just let the new chain transfer the lube ?
Scooty Puff Jr is offline  
Old 05-13-17, 06:13 PM
  #2  
Crankycrank
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 1,667
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 274 Post(s)
Liked 77 Times in 62 Posts
Put it on and ride. No need to do anything else. The factory lube is very good and will last a long time. The only problem some people have with the factory lube is it tends to attract dirt more than some other lubes.
Crankycrank is offline  
Old 05-13-17, 06:42 PM
  #3  
Scooty Puff Jr
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Scooty Puff Jr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: St. Petersburg, Fl
Posts: 935

Bikes: I'm a Flatbar Guy

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 355 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Crankycrank View Post
Put it on and ride. No need to do anything else. The factory lube is very good and will last a long time. The only problem some people have with the factory lube is it tends to attract dirt more than some other lubes.
That's what I was thinking, thanks. I use the "wet" lube anyways, gets very rainy here during the summer, so I always wipe the chain down after (most) every ride.
Scooty Puff Jr is offline  
Old 05-13-17, 07:16 PM
  #4  
mtnbke
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Boulder County, CO
Posts: 1,513

Bikes: '92 22" Cannondale M2000, '92 Cannondale R1000 Tandem, another modern Canndondale tandem, Two Holy Grail '86 Cannondale ST800s 27" (68.5cm) Touring bike w/Superbe Pro components and Phil Wood hubs. A bunch of other 27" ST frames & bikes.

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 107 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I'd always lube a new chain.

There are essentially two kinds of lubes:

Dry lube which is usually wax based and wet lube which is oil based. Factory lube can be adequate but what lube you should be using is a function of the conditions you ride in. In Colorado or Utah which is dry and dusty an oil based lube (like your factory lube) will just attract dirt and grime which will wear your cogs, chain and rings out quickly.

There is nothing magical about factory lube. If you want an oil based lube there are good ones that protect chains and components in wet environments. Generally the thicker the viscocity of the lube the more it acts as an attractant to dirt, dust grime but it also holds up better in rain and wet conditions.

You should never use a wax or Dry lube in wet and rainy conditions, instead use a wet or oil lube. You should never use a wet or oil lube in Fruita or Moab or even most of the Front Range of Colorado and the SW US. There just isn't enough moisture to warrant turning the drivetrain into a magnet for grime, grit and dirt.

In between a dry or clean wax lube and a heavy viscosity wet oil lube that rain won't wash off a chain is a thousand variances. Essentially everything in between is a compromise of sorts. Just as it's true that there is no single heat rangecspark plug for a two stroke engine that is "best" for all climates hot or cold, it is also true that there is no "best" lube for all conditions. Oil based for wet, but brings increased wear due to attracting grime and grit or wax based for dry, which doesn't quite lubricate the chain as well, initially but certainly much better than what a single ride can do to a new oiled chain in dusty, dirty and dry conditions.

I like White Lightning where I can't get Pedro's lubes.

Most cyclists don't but when running a dry lube on a road bike it's a good idea to carry a wet lube if you get caught in the rain. However, you want to clean the chain of the dirt magnet lube before the next ride.

An unlubricated chain is incredibly efficient. Chain drive is the most efficient manner of energy transference. Any friends you ride with that use belt drive are working harder to go slower in comparison. The lubrication is essentially a means to avoid wearing out cogs and rings prematurely or stretching chains unnecessarily,

If you live in a dusty, dirty and dry environment get that factory lube off and get a good amount of dry wax lube like White Lightning Clean Ride or Pedro's Slick Wax.

Remember the right chain cleaning and lubrication regimen in dry, dusty and dirty conditions is cleaning and living the chain THREE TIMES more often than you would in wet conditions. The reason isn't that the chain stays cleaner, as the cleaner chain would require less frequent cleanings not more frequent. The reason is that Wax lubes for dry and dirty conditions don't lady as long as heavy viscocity wet lubes. A wet lube is still adequately lubricating a dirty chain when you clean it and reapply, it doesn't break down or wash away, the problem is the maintenance interval is defined by the dirt, grime and grit that have been attracted to the oil.

Wax lubes wear out quickly but leave a clean chain, they need to be reapplied almost every ride or every 50 miles. Wet oil lubes last seemingly forever but will attract so much grit & grime that the drivetrain needs cleaned every 150 miles.

Anyone serious about Randonneuring explores lube drip systems that reapply lubrication to the chain constantly for those legendary 600k brevets. Like Pedro's Enduro wet lube or White Lightening Wet Ride.

Any other hybrid lube other than a dry wax lube or a wet oil lube is a compromise and do nothing well and really never be ideal for most conditions. Other than in a velodrome there is ALWAYS grit, grime and dust and dirt on every road ride and especially mountain rides. Usually the determining factor is whether it is wet or not. I avoid hybrid lubes they are almost always wrong for the application and cleaning/lubing intervals.
mtnbke is offline  
Old 05-13-17, 07:43 PM
  #5  
Scooty Puff Jr
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Scooty Puff Jr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: St. Petersburg, Fl
Posts: 935

Bikes: I'm a Flatbar Guy

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 355 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Wow, that was quite a read, thanks.
Scooty Puff Jr is offline  
Old 05-13-17, 08:25 PM
  #6  
Scooty Puff Jr
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Scooty Puff Jr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: St. Petersburg, Fl
Posts: 935

Bikes: I'm a Flatbar Guy

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 355 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Damn, I forgot how well the Alivio shifted, replaced it with the HG93 chain, makes a entry level groupset feel a little better.

Scooty Puff Jr is offline  
Old 05-13-17, 09:56 PM
  #7  
Scooty Puff Jr
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Scooty Puff Jr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: St. Petersburg, Fl
Posts: 935

Bikes: I'm a Flatbar Guy

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 355 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Ha ! What was I thinking ? New chain shifted great on the stand, but not so well on the test ride around the block. Just ordered a new cassette, new chain and old cassette just don't get along. This is what happens when beer and bike maintenance cross paths.
Scooty Puff Jr is offline  
Old 05-13-17, 10:53 PM
  #8  
operator
cab horn
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto
Posts: 28,354

Bikes: 1987 Bianchi Campione

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by mtnbke View Post
I'd always lube a new chain.

There are essentially two kinds of lubes:

Dry lube which is usually wax based and wet lube which is oil based. Factory lube can be adequate but what lube you should be using is a function of the conditions you ride in. In Colorado or Utah which is dry and dusty an oil based lube (like your factory lube) will just attract dirt and grime which will wear your cogs, chain and rings out quickly.

There is nothing magical about factory lube. If you want an oil based lube there are good ones that protect chains and components in wet environments. Generally the thicker the viscocity of the lube the more it acts as an attractant to dirt, dust grime but it also holds up better in rain and wet conditions.

You should never use a wax or Dry lube in wet and rainy conditions, instead use a wet or oil lube. You should never use a wet or oil lube in Fruita or Moab or even most of the Front Range of Colorado and the SW US. There just isn't enough moisture to warrant turning the drivetrain into a magnet for grime, grit and dirt.

In between a dry or clean wax lube and a heavy viscosity wet oil lube that rain won't wash off a chain is a thousand variances. Essentially everything in between is a compromise of sorts. Just as it's true that there is no single heat rangecspark plug for a two stroke engine that is "best" for all climates hot or cold, it is also true that there is no "best" lube for all conditions. Oil based for wet, but brings increased wear due to attracting grime and grit or wax based for dry, which doesn't quite lubricate the chain as well, initially but certainly much better than what a single ride can do to a new oiled chain in dusty, dirty and dry conditions.

I like White Lightning where I can't get Pedro's lubes.

Most cyclists don't but when running a dry lube on a road bike it's a good idea to carry a wet lube if you get caught in the rain. However, you want to clean the chain of the dirt magnet lube before the next ride.

An unlubricated chain is incredibly efficient. Chain drive is the most efficient manner of energy transference. Any friends you ride with that use belt drive are working harder to go slower in comparison. The lubrication is essentially a means to avoid wearing out cogs and rings prematurely or stretching chains unnecessarily,

If you live in a dusty, dirty and dry environment get that factory lube off and get a good amount of dry wax lube like White Lightning Clean Ride or Pedro's Slick Wax.

Remember the right chain cleaning and lubrication regimen in dry, dusty and dirty conditions is cleaning and living the chain THREE TIMES more often than you would in wet conditions. The reason isn't that the chain stays cleaner, as the cleaner chain would require less frequent cleanings not more frequent. The reason is that Wax lubes for dry and dirty conditions don't lady as long as heavy viscocity wet lubes. A wet lube is still adequately lubricating a dirty chain when you clean it and reapply, it doesn't break down or wash away, the problem is the maintenance interval is defined by the dirt, grime and grit that have been attracted to the oil.

Wax lubes wear out quickly but leave a clean chain, they need to be reapplied almost every ride or every 50 miles. Wet oil lubes last seemingly forever but will attract so much grit & grime that the drivetrain needs cleaned every 150 miles.

Anyone serious about Randonneuring explores lube drip systems that reapply lubrication to the chain constantly for those legendary 600k brevets. Like Pedro's Enduro wet lube or White Lightening Wet Ride.

Any other hybrid lube other than a dry wax lube or a wet oil lube is a compromise and do nothing well and really never be ideal for most conditions. Other than in a velodrome there is ALWAYS grit, grime and dust and dirt on every road ride and especially mountain rides. Usually the determining factor is whether it is wet or not. I avoid hybrid lubes they are almost always wrong for the application and cleaning/lubing intervals.
Listen to this person and you waste gigantic amounts of time doing **** all.

Put chain on and ride bike.
operator is offline  
Old 05-14-17, 07:21 AM
  #9  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 21,517

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2165 Post(s)
Liked 533 Times in 367 Posts
Just to be clear: oil and grease do not attract dirt; they collect dirt. If you ride in dirty conditions, an oily or greasy chain will get dirty more quickly than if you used a dry lube. If you ride in clean conditions, even an oily or greasy chain will stay clean. Take your riding conditions into consideration when choosing a chain lube.

Last edited by JohnDThompson; 05-14-17 at 07:25 AM.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 05-14-17, 09:26 AM
  #10  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 42,522

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 194 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7314 Post(s)
Liked 903 Times in 572 Posts
the surfaces that need the lubrication , are inside the chain,

Inside the rollers , and around the pins..

so wipe off the excess.. from the outside..
fietsbob is offline  
Old 05-14-17, 09:27 AM
  #11  
mtnbke
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Boulder County, CO
Posts: 1,513

Bikes: '92 22" Cannondale M2000, '92 Cannondale R1000 Tandem, another modern Canndondale tandem, Two Holy Grail '86 Cannondale ST800s 27" (68.5cm) Touring bike w/Superbe Pro components and Phil Wood hubs. A bunch of other 27" ST frames & bikes.

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 107 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Anyone who wants to maximize the life of their drivetrain, an old cool guy trick is to buy four chains when the drivetrain is new. You rotate the chains about every 500 miles. It's important to label the chains off the bike to keep them straight.

Aside from dirt and grit/grime what destroys a drivetrain is a stretched chain wearing cogs/rings.

It's why you can't let a chain stretch and then just put on a new chain and ride without everything shifting all crappy. The stretched chain wears the cogs and rings to match. Chains (even Campy) are cheap compared to new rings and cassettes. You'll get x4 more life out of your drivetrain by rotating four chains.

Ride 500 miles on A chain switch to chain B
Ride 500 miles on B chain switch to chain C
Ride 500 miles on C chain switch to chain D
Ride 500 miles on D chain

Then start over.

With 10 speed it's better to use 300 mile intervals
11 speed use 200 mile intervals
mtnbke is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Ayo_23
General Cycling Discussion
13
05-10-19 05:06 AM
shine2000
Bicycle Mechanics
6
11-09-18 10:33 AM
suncruiser
Bicycle Mechanics
14
12-07-16 12:46 PM
undisputed83
Commuting
25
05-14-10 11:34 AM
WorldIRC
Bicycle Mechanics
6
04-15-10 02:04 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.