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Park CRC-1 Crown Race Cutter

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Park CRC-1 Crown Race Cutter

Old 05-19-17, 01:45 PM
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superstring
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Park CRC-1 Crown Race Cutter

Has anyone had any experience with this reaming/facing tool? It looks good but I can't find any reviews online. Thanks
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Old 05-19-17, 03:05 PM
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Originally Posted by superstring View Post
Has anyone had any experience with this reaming/facing tool? It looks good but I can't find any reviews online. Thanks
It works fine, used as directed. You won't see many reviews, because it's really only used by large repair shops or frame builders (but just like everything, there are people who have to own the tools...). If you have some strange head tube/integrated bearings, you'll likely need to buy different reamers than the tool comes with.

There isn't a ton of competition in the market...VAR (only recently, again), Cyclus, and Park are the only real current main producers of such tools.
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Old 05-19-17, 03:07 PM
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What are you trying to do? Reface the bottom or mill the size smaller? Or both?

Hand files can be used if the size needs to be reduced. I had a Japanese fork with 27mm JIS crown race seat but needed to use an ISO 26.4mm crown race. A coarse file was gently used, checking often with calipers until it was close. I switched to a fine file until the crown race popped on. It's not that big of a deal.

You could call around to shops and see of someone still has one. This work isn't done frequently however but you might be in luck if you found an older mechanic who built frames or custom frame shop. A frame builder here in Atlanta offered to do it for $20 but it was a 1.5 hour drive so I just did it myself.


-Tim-
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Old 05-19-17, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
What are you trying to do? Reface the bottom or mill the size smaller? Or both?

.......

You could call around to shops and see of someone still has one. This work isn't done frequently however but you might be in luck if you found an older mechanic who built frames or custom frame shop. A frame builder here in Atlanta offered to do it for $20 but it was a 1.5 hour drive so I just did it myself.


-Tim-
Thanks for the replies. I want to mill the collar size smaller AND face the seat. Yeah, I could get a LBS to do it but, after a few bad experiences, I'd rather do it myself. Good bike mechanics are few and far between it seems.

Besides a man can never have too many tools, no?

Last edited by superstring; 05-19-17 at 03:29 PM.
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Old 05-19-17, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by superstring View Post
Thanks for the replies. I want to mill the collar size smaller AND face the seat. Yeah, I could get a LBS to do it but, after a few bad experiences, I'd rather do it myself. Good bike mechanics are few and far between it seems.

Besides a man can never have too many tools, no?
That's an expensive one to buy for a single use.

You may want to ask a machine shop to do it for you. I want to say those guys are usually more trained than the typical bike mechanic.
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Old 05-19-17, 04:39 PM
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Originally Posted by superstring View Post
Thanks for the replies. I want to mill the collar size smaller AND face the seat. Yeah, I could get a LBS to do it but, after a few bad experiences, I'd rather do it myself. Good bike mechanics are few and far between it seems.

Besides a man can never have too many tools, no?
There are legitimate reasons to want to do it yourself.

The cutters/reamers are sharpened with a general edge or all purpose for most shops that can't afford to have specific cutters optimized for titanium, aluminum and steel. If you've got a nice bike you really don't want some $9/hr hack grabbing a tool that isn't optimized for your frame material nor is it even properly sharpened. I've never seen a shop mechanic use enough cutting fluid, because of the mess, and this leads to galling, tearing of the metal, and overheating. The reality is the important facing, cutting, or chasing jobs as a rule are always done in shops by bufoon mechanics with little experience and less training.

I say buy your own tools. Get them Nitride vapor coated they stay sharper longer (almost twice as long) and the cutting faces turn easier. A metal plater that specializes in coatings usually has a $150-200 minimum setup charge, but the actual piece rate for each die, cutter, reamer, tap can be as cheap as $5 each.

Good shops like Yellow Jersey have glistening Campagnolo frame tools that are professionally sharpened and Nitride coated.

I've always felt anyone passionate about bikes should have their own tools. Anyone who knows anything about bikes knows that there is almost never anyone who knows anything about bikes at the LBS, let alone wrenching on them.
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Old 05-19-17, 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by mtnbke View Post
There are legitimate reasons to want to do it yourself.

The cutters/reamers are sharpened with a general edge or all purpose for most shops that can't afford to have specific cutters optimized for titanium, aluminum and steel. If you've got a nice bike you really don't want some $9/hr hack grabbing a tool that isn't optimized for your frame material nor is it even properly sharpened. I've never seen a shop mechanic use enough cutting fluid, because of the mess, and this leads to galling, tearing of the metal, and overheating. The reality is the important facing, cutting, or chasing jobs as a rule are always done in shops by bufoon mechanics with little experience and less training.

I say buy your own tools. Get them Nitride vapor coated they stay sharper longer (almost twice as long) and the cutting faces turn easier. A metal plater that specializes in coatings usually has a $150-200 minimum setup charge, but the actual piece rate for each die, cutter, reamer, tap can be as cheap as $5 each.

Good shops like Yellow Jersey have glistening Campagnolo frame tools that are professionally sharpened and Nitride coated.

I've always felt anyone passionate about bikes should have their own tools. Anyone who knows anything about bikes knows that there is almost never anyone who knows anything about bikes at the LBS, let alone wrenching on them.
A man after my own heart!
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Old 05-19-17, 05:22 PM
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I'll add one detail. Don't try to cut a lot at one time. The chance of over cutting is greater with greater material removal. For crown race seats I file it down a bunch (or for 1" steerers run a 27.0 cutter) first. then cut with the size specific cutter second.


As to the Park cutters- They work well enough. But when you use others you'll see why park's don't have the reputation that some others have. I will say Parks are easy to find, are rather flexible in the cutters available and not too costly. Andy
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Old 05-19-17, 06:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
I'll add one detail. Don't try to cut a lot at one time. The chance of over cutting is greater with greater material removal. For crown race seats I file it down a bunch (or for 1" steerers run a 27.0 cutter) first. then cut with the size specific cutter second.


As to the Park cutters- They work well enough. But when you use others you'll see why park's don't have the reputation that some others have. I will say Parks are easy to find, are rather flexible in the cutters available and not too costly. Andy
Thanks, Andy. Yeah, I kinda figure the Park cutter isn't as high quality as, say, a VAR cutter but I can only justify so much expenditure (my wife comes into this ) and since I probably won't be using it much, it will probably do the trick.
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Old 05-19-17, 07:31 PM
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You might be able to find someone capable if you look around.

Here in Atlanta there are two mechanics, older guys who used to build frames from scratch. I know one of them and he actually recommended the other guy because he was closer. Capable people are out there.

Call around and you will know immediately. Most mechanics don't even know that a crown race seat can be cut. I had one mechanic accuse me of trying to do something jackass but eventually someone will point you in the right direction.

Again, you can always use a hand file and set of calipers. That's what I did on a 3Rensho replica fork. Getting through the chrome was the most difficult part but after that it was easy.

This is before it was cut.

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Old 07-09-18, 05:43 AM
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Originally Posted by superstring View Post
Has anyone had any experience with this reaming/facing tool? It looks good but I can't find any reviews online. Thanks
I recently purchased one because I had several frames/forks that were impossible to get the headsets adjusted properly. I had called several local bike shops and none of them had the capabilities of cutting a new seat on a fork crown.

The CRC-1 is very easy to use and does an excellent job. I already had the HTR-1 (head-tube reamer/facer) and this combination allowed me to prep the frame/fork making it easy to properly adjust the headsets on my Raleigh frames. I imagine a high-end shop who would invest in these tools, keep them sharp and employ a trained mechanic would charge $75.00-$100.00 to do this work.
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Old 07-09-18, 09:28 AM
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Hey, branko, thanks for the feedback. In the end I took my forks to a machinist and he refaced the crown seat using a lathe. I just couldn't justify the cost of the CRC-1 even though my motto is "a man can never have too many (nice) tools".
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Old 07-09-18, 10:23 AM
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One interesting feature with the Campagnolo crown race cutter is that it also has cutting surfaces inside the bore of the tool. I haven't seen that with other crown race cutters.

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Old 07-09-18, 10:51 AM
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chrome plated , I'd expect to charge extra, as they shorten the time the tool is sharp..
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Old 07-09-18, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
One interesting feature with the Campagnolo crown race cutter is that it also has cutting surfaces inside the bore of the tool. I haven't seen that with other crown race cutters.

I think they are all like this, otherwise they wouldn't work!
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Old 07-09-18, 02:32 PM
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Originally Posted by superstring View Post
I think they are all like this, otherwise they wouldn't work!
Nope. I have the Park tool, and the cutters are on the face only. The main purpose of the tool is for milling the crown race seat, but it will work to reduce the diameter of the shoulder, even without the internal teeth.
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Old 07-09-18, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Dan Burkhart View Post
Nope. I have the Park tool, and the cutters are on the face only. The main purpose of the tool is for milling the crown race seat, but it will work to reduce the diameter of the shoulder, even without the internal teeth.
How does it "work to reduce the diameter of the shoulder" without the internal teeth? (Park does say that "The CRC-1 is a professional quality machining tool for milling both the outer edge and lower surfaces of the crown race seat")
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Old 07-09-18, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by superstring View Post
How does it "work to reduce the diameter of the shoulder" without the internal teeth? (Park does say that "The CRC-1 is a professional quality machining tool for milling both the outer edge and lower surfaces of the crown race seat")
It cuts it's way down one revolution at a time. It does work. I've taken JIS crown races down to ISO spec this way.
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Old 07-09-18, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Dan Burkhart View Post
It cuts it's way down one revolution at a time. It does work. I've taken JIS crown races down to ISO spec this way.
Sure, but how does it do it without internal teeth? Are you saying it reduces the diameter by pressure alone?
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Old 07-09-18, 03:20 PM
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Originally Posted by superstring View Post
Sure, but how does it do it without internal teeth? Are you saying it reduces the diameter by pressure alone?
I haven't tried it but it looks like the inner most portion of the facing cutter would do the work.
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Old 07-09-18, 03:20 PM
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Originally Posted by superstring View Post
Sure, but how does it do it without internal teeth? Are you saying it reduces the diameter by pressure alone?
No. The teeth are the full width of the face of the cutter, so the inner tip of the cutter teeth will cut away the excess sort of like feeding a tool across a rotating work piece in a lathe, only here you have multiple cutting teeth on a rotating tool and the work piece is stationary.
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Old 07-09-18, 03:23 PM
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For the price of the park tool you could have a nice custom fork built.

There are several reputable frame builders in BC that might be willing to do it. ( face and size the fork )

Last edited by wsteve464; 07-09-18 at 03:54 PM. Reason: clarification
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Old 07-09-18, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by superstring View Post
Sure, but how does it do it without internal teeth? Are you saying it reduces the diameter by pressure alone?
Keep in mind that there are three cutters with different diameters supplied with the tool, 26.5 mm, 27.1 mm and 30.1 mm.
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Old 07-09-18, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Dan Burkhart View Post
No. The teeth are the full width of the face of the cutter, so the inner tip of the cutter teeth will cut away the excess sort of like feeding a tool across a rotating work piece in a lathe, only here you have multiple cutting teeth on a rotating tool and the work piece is stationary.
So it does have internal teeth, if I understand what you're saying. (If you're suggesting that it only has teeth on the bottom (ie the seat cutter) then, once again, how does it cut the" shoulder"?)
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Old 07-09-18, 03:27 PM
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Originally Posted by wsteve464 View Post
For the price of the park tool you could have a nice custom fork built.

There are several reputable frame builders in BC that might be willing to do it.
Hi, wsteve, I've already addressed this in a previous post.
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