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Add hydraulic disc brakes to Trek DS 8.3 2012

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Add hydraulic disc brakes to Trek DS 8.3 2012

Old 06-07-17, 01:33 PM
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hernejj
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Add hydraulic disc brakes to Trek DS 8.3 2012

I have a 2012 Trek Dual Sport 8.3 (archive.trekbikes.com/us/en/2012/Trek/8_3_ds_2012) and I would like to add hydraulic disc brakes to it.

Can I just replace my current Tektro Novela brake hardware with any hydraulic set that I like? Or are there certain things I need to check for compatibility?

Based on a quick search it looks like Shimano M675 would be a good set (planetcyclery.com/shimano-slx-m675-brake-set).
Does anyone have any advice for or against these brakes? I'm open to other suggestions but I'd like to stay around $100-$130 total if possible.

Thanks.
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Old 06-07-17, 02:43 PM
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Hose length for the rear brake, you may want to check to make sure it's long enough for your bike. That length I believe is more for smaller bikes. Otherwise, a nice deal! But might be overkill depending on your needs. If your only doing the trails and road riding, the lesser expensive Shimano's might be just as good.

Hose Length: 770mm Front/1300mm Rear
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Old 06-07-17, 03:53 PM
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There is really no good reason to go for hydraulics unless you're bombing down really steep hills on that bike. Mechanical discs work just as well and are MUCH easier to maintain.

Things to think about before going hydraulic.

Do you have the tools to bleed the brakes?
Do you know where you can buy the fluid for the brakes?
Do you know how to bleed the brakes? or Are you willing to pay someone else to bleed the brakes?
Are the mounting styles the same? Post mount vs. ????
Is the mounting hardware including spacers the same? (There are different sized spacers for different rotor diameters and different mounting styles.)

The brakes you posted are overkill. Even the low end shimano hydraulics work great if you want to go that route. Save yourself some money. And it's not a case of "more expensive = less maintenance." Some of my friends with $10,000+ mountain bikes have replaced, sent back, returned more sets of levers and calipers on their top of the line shimano hydraulics than anybody else I know.

Why don't you tell us WHY you want to go hydraulic and we'll work to fix the problem with your mechanical.
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Old 06-07-17, 08:15 PM
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hernejj
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
Do you have the tools to bleed the brakes?
Do you know where you can buy the fluid for the brakes?
Do you know how to bleed the brakes? or Are you willing to pay someone else to bleed the brakes?
All part of the learning process. I'm willing to learn if the benefits are worth it. Based on what I've read, I suspect they are.

Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
Are the mounting styles the same? Post mount vs. ????
Is the mounting hardware including spacers the same? (There are different sized spacers for different rotor diameters and different mounting styles.)
This is the stuff I really know nothing about. My Tektro Novellas mount via two holes on the fork as seen here:
bike-advisor.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/tektro-novela-mechanical-disc-brakes-2014-4.jpg

The Shimano M675's appear to attach using two bolts, but on a different axis...
media1.rosebikes.de/product/1850/1/8/1859616_2.czsqurcqea.jpg

I'm guessing I can just reuse the adapter that the Tektro's appear to be using, assuming my bike has it.

As for the spacing... how can I know if any new brake caliper will fit without buying it and trying it?

Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
The brakes you posted are overkill. Even the low end shimano hydraulics work great if you want to go that route. Save yourself some money.
Fair enough, happy to consider other options. Do you have any specific suggestions?

Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
Why don't you tell us WHY you want to go hydraulic and we'll work to fix the problem with your mechanical.
My issues with my Tektro Novellas are:
1. Extremely noisy. This is a common complain, I've tried different pads, and cleaning the rotors only helps for about a day,
2. I have small hands, and the reduced actuation distance and force of hydraulics appeals to me. These novella's are impossible to adjust to fit my hands without losing most of the available braking power.
3. I hate that mech disc calipers flex the rotor into a fixed pad. I read that hydraulics actuate the pads on both sides which increases effectiveness of braking, leads to more even pad wear and makes adjusting the brakes far easier.
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Old 06-07-17, 09:20 PM
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Originally Posted by hernejj View Post
My issues with my Tektro Novellas are:
1. Extremely noisy. This is a common complain, I've tried different pads, and cleaning the rotors only helps for about a day,
2. I have small hands, and the reduced actuation distance and force of hydraulics appeals to me. These novella's are impossible to adjust to fit my hands without losing most of the available braking power.
3. I hate that mech disc calipers flex the rotor into a fixed pad. I read that hydraulics actuate the pads on both sides which increases effectiveness of braking, leads to more even pad wear and makes adjusting the brakes far easier.
I have to be quick, so I can't answer all of your questions, but I will answer these.

1. Hydraulics squeeze the same pads onto the same rotor. They will be JUST as loud. If you want quiet, go rim brakes or hub brakes.
2. The only good point you make. Hydraulics will definitely reduce the needed lever pressure to stop and if you hands are small, could definitely help you. However, see the note below.
3. If the mech calipers are flexing the disc significantly, you've got it adjusted wrong, you need to turn in the adjustment on the other side to bring the fixed pad closer to the rotor.

Also of note, adjusting the "grab point/reach" of a hydraulic disc system is a royal pain in the ass unless you buy the top of the line versions that have those adjustments available to you via little Allen screws. And even if you get it right, you need to do those same adjustments ever time you bleed the system.

My guess is that your pads are ruined right now and your calipers are out of adjustment. Mechanical discs should have plenty of power to stop you with very little lever pressure. If you can't stop yourself by pulling the lever with 1 finger (even someone with small hands), something is wrong.
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Old 06-07-17, 10:26 PM
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The answer which everybody always wants to over complicate is YES they will work. The rear hose will probably be too long because they are generous but you can live with it as is till you need to bleed them anyway and then shorten the hose if you care. Shimano brakes are the easiest there are to bleed, the tools are super cheap, and they can go years before needing it. SLX are over kill but I wouldn't go much lower maybe Deore m615s but they really aren't much cheaper. The SLX have that very visible knob for adjusting reach while the Deore you have to use a hex wrench.
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Old 06-08-17, 06:51 AM
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[QUOTE=corrado33;19638893]
1. Hydraulics squeeze the same pads onto the same rotor. They will be JUST as loud. If you want quiet, go rim brakes or hub brakes.

Also of note, adjusting the "grab point/reach" of a hydraulic disc system is a royal pain in the ass unless you buy the top of the line versions that have those adjustments available to you via little Allen screws. And even if you get it right, you need to do those same adjustments ever time you bleed the system.
QUOTE]

Magura Multi Use make hydraulic RIM (as well as disc) brakes which are very powerful and quiet and have an easily-adjustable reach adjustment. You might have a look at them. I have the HS33s on one of my bikes and they are great. Highly recommended.
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Old 06-08-17, 06:57 AM
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If quiet is the important thing, drum brake hubs do that..

maybe new pads, have a bike shop do the work if you are not happy with the DIY results
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Old 06-08-17, 12:44 PM
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hernejj
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Originally Posted by Canker View Post
The answer which everybody always wants to over complicate is YES they will work. The rear hose will probably be too long because they are generous but you can live with it as is till you need to bleed them anyway and then shorten the hose if you care. Shimano brakes are the easiest there are to bleed, the tools are super cheap, and they can go years before needing it. SLX are over kill but I wouldn't go much lower maybe Deore m615s but they really aren't much cheaper. The SLX have that very visible knob for adjusting reach while the Deore you have to use a hex wrench.
Cool, I'm happy to have confirmation that, should I decide to go hydraulic, that the Shimano M675's should work. Also happy to know that adjustments are made easy .

Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
Magura Multi Use make hydraulic RIM (as well as disc) brakes which are very powerful and quiet and have an easily-adjustable reach adjustment. You might have a look at them. I have the HS33s on one of my bikes and they are great. Highly recommended.
Thank you for the pointer, I'll be sure to take a look at Magura offerings.
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