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Can you recommend a small pump?

Old 07-27-17, 02:43 AM
  #1  
Arthur Peabody
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Can you recommend a small pump?

I've had 3 and they haven't performed as advertised. The most pressure any of them ever achieved was 60 psi, which is acceptable until I get home. I broke the last 2 eventually; my current pump I can't get more than 40 psi with anymore. I carry it in a pannier; 18 inches is the longest I'll try. I don't want a frame pump.
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Old 07-27-17, 03:32 AM
  #2  
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https://www.specialized.com/us/en/eq...ad-pump/117290
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Old 07-27-17, 04:33 AM
  #3  
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I've used a Topeak "Road Morph" for several years. It's small but performs sort of like a floor pump. I've pumped tires to 115 PSI with relatively little effort. It had a gauge, which is very convenient.
Steve
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Old 07-27-17, 05:31 AM
  #4  
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The laws of physics can't be broken no matter who makes the pump. Essentially, inflating a tire is a pressure/volume proposition.

You need to push enough volume into your tire to obtain the required pressure. The bigger the pump, the more volume you get with each stroke.

Pressure depends on how hard you can push and the cross section area of your pump. If your pump has a 1 sq/in section and you can push with 50 lbs of force, the most pressure you can get will be 50 psi. If your pump only has a 1/2 sq/in cross section, you will be able to get 100 psi but it will take longer because you are getting less volume with each stroke.

Here's the bottomline: When you slice a pie, for every big slice you have to have a little slice. There is no way around that regardless of what the marketing guys say. Great big pumps will inflate your tire faster (if you can push it). Skinny pumps, for the same operator, will produce higher pressures. Floor pumps are better because they allow you to push downward with the weight of your torso. Pumps that have a hose are better because you're less likely to tear off your valve stem. Dinky little mini pumps store more compactly on your bike but don't measure up well in other ways.
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Old 07-27-17, 06:01 AM
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The Topeak road Morph G is a great little pump, it has a hose for convenient valve access, no-tools conversion between Schrader and Presta, makes good pressure and has an accurate-enough gauge.
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Old 07-27-17, 08:46 AM
  #6  
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The Topeak Road Morph G is a great portable pump. If you find that its 13.8" length is too long for your liking, there's a 10.4" version called the Mini Morph. It works just as well, but because of the shorter length, it takes more strokes to fill the tire. Other than the length, I believe the only other difference between the two pumps is that the Road Morph has a pressure gauge.

I've got a Mini Morph and have no problem going over 90 PSI.
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Old 07-27-17, 09:00 AM
  #7  
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I use a regular floor pump and then when out of the road, I bring a Topeak Pocket Rocket Mini Pump. I have had no problems getting tires over 100psi with this, but it does take patience due to the low volume of air it pushes due to the small, compact design.
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Old 07-27-17, 09:06 AM
  #8  
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Lezyne Micro Floor Drive. I love the threaded chuck and air-bleed valve. Also available with an in-line gauge.
https://www.amazon.com/Lezyne-Micro-.../dp/B0065ZMWMI

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Old 07-27-17, 12:05 PM
  #9  
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I have the Lezyne pump also. It has worked well for over 5 years. You can stand on it by flipping down the metal foot rest and pump away from a comfortable stance made possible by the length of rubber hose. It is not a minimalist pump weighing 150 grams but who's counting.
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Old 07-27-17, 01:54 PM
  #10  
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I have the Lezyne and hated it for the few times I used it, however I have an older version so maybe they improved the chuck since then. On mine, the rotating collar that threads onto the Presta valve jams under pressure so the only way to get it back off is to spin the entire pump and hose, which is really awkward on such a large pump. Also the groove in the handle where the hose seats can be really uncomfortable bordering on painful if you have thin gloves and are pumping to high pressure. I do like that the handle is centered over the piston though. I never feel like I have a good grip on the Road Morph's handle, which folds out to one side.

Bontrager has a pump that's kind of like a deluxe Road Morph, with a metal footpeg that hopefully is more durable (I once tore the foot peg off a Turbo Morph, which is a fat version of the Road Morph designed for higher volume tires).
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Old 07-27-17, 03:04 PM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by Metaluna View Post
I have the Lezyne and hated it for the few times I used it, however I have an older version so maybe they improved the chuck since then. On mine, the rotating collar that threads onto the Presta valve jams under pressure so the only way to get it back off is to spin the entire pump and hose, which is really awkward on such a large pump. Also the groove in the handle where the hose seats can be really uncomfortable bordering on painful if you have thin gloves and are pumping to high pressure. I do like that the handle is centered over the piston though. I never feel like I have a good grip on the Road Morph's handle, which folds out to one side.

Bontrager has a pump that's kind of like a deluxe Road Morph, with a metal footpeg that hopefully is more durable (I once tore the foot peg off a Turbo Morph, which is a fat version of the Road Morph designed for higher volume tires).
I know Lezyne did release an updated chuck within the last couple of years, so perhaps that problem was fixed.
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Old 07-27-17, 03:56 PM
  #12  
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[QUOTE=ecnewell;19748628]Lezyne Micro Floor Drive. I love the threaded chuck and air-bleed valve. Also available with an in-line gauge. QUOTE]

+1 on Lezyne. I have the one with gauge and it is always there in my backpack. I even take it along for travel when I hope that I will get a bike to ride at the other end. I had Topeak Morph too and Lezyne beats it in terms of durability and consistency in use. You have to get used to, though, the screwing and unscrewing of the chuck.
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Old 07-27-17, 05:26 PM
  #13  
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Love my Road Morph

Originally Posted by sweeks View Post
I've used a Topeak "Road Morph" for several years. It's small but performs sort of like a floor pump. I've pumped tires to 115 PSI with relatively little effort. It had a gauge, which is very convenient.
Steve
Yeah, terrific pump.
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Old 07-27-17, 05:32 PM
  #14  
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Here's a tiny ultralight for emergencies

Originally Posted by Arthur Peabody View Post
I've had 3 and they haven't performed as advertised. The most pressure any of them ever achieved was 60 psi, which is acceptable until I get home. I broke the last 2 eventually; my current pump I can't get more than 40 psi with anymore. I carry it in a pannier; 18 inches is the longest I'll try. I don't want a frame pump.
I tour with my topeak road morph but do my Urban commute with this tiny, ultralight carbon fiber pump that is said to be the lightest in the world. It's enough to get enough air in a newly installed spare tube to get me home, but you have to pump a million pumps. Get this only for ultralight, tiny size emergency purposes. Barbierie Nana. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001N2M9XK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_awdb_RBNEzbGJQWPT2
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Old 07-27-17, 06:18 PM
  #15  
AndreyT
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I use BikeSmart SteadyFlate 2, which is a long-ish compact pump with an extendable hose, symmetrical T-handle and can be placed on the ground for pumping. It works fine for me for getting to 100 psi of pressure. However, this is a small-diameter pump, which means that it takes a lot of pumping to reach the pressure.

Recently I tried Topeak Road Morph and, being a "fatter" pump, it definitely pumps faster. And its in-line gauge is also nice to have. But, again, it is a larger diameter pump and therefore is not as compact as my SteadyFlate.
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Old 07-27-17, 09:47 PM
  #16  
Jeff Wills
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Another vote for the Road Morph pump. I have 3- one on each regularly-ridden bike. I also have standard floor pump in the garage for pre-ride inflation checks.
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Old 07-27-17, 10:28 PM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
The laws of physics can't be broken no matter who makes the pump. Essentially, inflating a tire is a pressure/volume proposition.

You need to push enough volume into your tire to obtain the required pressure. The bigger the pump, the more volume you get with each stroke.

Pressure depends on how hard you can push and the cross section area of your pump. If your pump has a 1 sq/in section and you can push with 50 lbs of force, the most pressure you can get will be 50 psi. If your pump only has a 1/2 sq/in cross section, you will be able to get 100 psi but it will take longer because you are getting less volume with each stroke.

Here's the bottomline: When you slice a pie, for every big slice you have to have a little slice. There is no way around that regardless of what the marketing guys say. Great big pumps will inflate your tire faster (if you can push it). Skinny pumps, for the same operator, will produce higher pressures. Floor pumps are better because they allow you to push downward with the weight of your torso. Pumps that have a hose are better because you're less likely to tear off your valve stem. Dinky little mini pumps store more compactly on your bike but don't measure up well in other ways.
Yes!

For that reason, Imo, get a long slim pump like a Zefal HPX size 1 or size 2.
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Old 07-27-17, 11:38 PM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by sweeks View Post
I've used a Topeak "Road Morph" for several years. It's small but performs sort of like a floor pump. I've pumped tires to 115 PSI with relatively little effort. It had a gauge, which is very convenient.
Steve
I've recommended this pump for years.

When you need a pump anything else is a toy.
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Old 07-28-17, 07:27 AM
  #19  
sweeks
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Originally Posted by velocentrik View Post
I've recommended this pump for years.

When you need a pump anything else is a toy.
Amen. But an inadequate pump is not a toy; toys are supposed to be fun to play with, not dispense misery!

Steve
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Old 07-28-17, 08:10 AM
  #20  
banerjek
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I've used the Road Morph on my workhorse commuter for many years, but it's big, heavy, and it's not something you want to throw in a pannier.

For something that goes in a pannier, the Lezyne Road Drive is a better way to go -- I use this on my race bike and 'bents. Much smaller/lighter and very easy to pump up to any pressure.
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Old 07-28-17, 08:50 AM
  #21  
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if you ever want to bail on the pump idea, I've been enjoying this tiny Genuine Innovations Air Chuck Elite CO2 Inflator
Attached Images
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Old 07-28-17, 09:13 AM
  #22  
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I have half a dozen "pocket" or "mini" pumps and the only one that remotely gets a tire up to pressure within an acceptable number of pumps is the Silca Pocket Impero. Their new Tattico mini pump (less expensive )may be good too but I have not tried it.

Unless you absolutely positively have to have a mini pump, the Zefal HP frame pump is awesome, durable and relatively light. It also has the advantage that it will get a tire up to your desired pressure fairly quickly. I used my 25 year old model to pump my tires daily and it won't die. I can get my tires to 100 psi without too many pumps. Try that with any mini pump, it ain't gonna happen. Plus, the Zefal HP is inexpensive and doesn't weigh that much more than a mini pump...in the scheme of things. If you're weight conscious, lose one pound off your body and buy the Zefal. You won't notice it while riding.


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