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Flat bars to drop handle bars Giant Seek Hybrid

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Flat bars to drop handle bars Giant Seek Hybrid

Old 09-25-17, 03:14 AM
  #1  
pjfamilyguy
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Flat bars to drop handle bars Giant Seek Hybrid

Hi all,

I thought the above sounded simple but the more I look into it the more questions pop up.

For starters my hybrid bike says its a Giant seek 0 on the frame giant-bicycles.com/gb/seek-0-2012

But looking at what is on the bike it is closer too giant-bicycles.com/gb/seek-1-2012 as the frame is brush Ali and the gears are 9 x 3 even then some components don't match the seek 1 ?! grrr

What I can work out about the components is

Front and Rear mec is Deore (no more details than thank)
front and rear shifters are Alivo
Crankset is 3
Rear cassette is 9

I will counts the cogs soon (if that makes a difference) and if there are specific details I need to get please advise.
What I would like to do is replace the flat handle bars with some basic drop bars as that's a more comfortable position for me to ride in

From speaking to a college at work, itís not just a case of finding some matching shifters to replace the current ones and make sure they are 9 x 3 but also the "amount of pull by the shifter is important" and this pull is based on the spacing of the cassette and crankset. so I've no way of identifying them correctly. So Iím kinda stuck

I have to say currently the bike shifts beautifully, so any change has to match this.

Is this something for my LBS or something I can tinker with ? I am mechanically minded

As you can tell Iím a newbie so go easy on me !!

TIA

Paul
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Old 09-25-17, 10:42 AM
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If the derailleurs are nine speed deore, you probably are okay with shimano nine speed road shifters. You sometimes can find the compatibility looking through the service docs on shimano's site. They can be confusing at first but after a while you'll figure out the order to their chaos.

An email inquiry might work too. I had a question about a continental tire a week ago and sent them an email and got a very helpful response the same afternoon. Don't know how shimano is on email support.
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Old 09-25-17, 12:46 PM
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A Shimano right/rear drop bar shifter will work with your rear derailer and cassette.

But your front derailer will not play nice with a Shimano drop bar front shifter.

And what brakes do you have?
Regular v-brakes don't work well with regular drop brake levers.
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Old 09-25-17, 02:45 PM
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9 speed Bar end Shifters and regular drop bar brake levers . cables housing and tape,


might want a shorter stem with some up angle, for drop bars
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Old 09-25-17, 03:39 PM
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Hi Paul;

First - it is going to be expensive, what is your budget.

As noted above, bar end shifters are easier - then you do not have to replace your FD, and calipers.

These levers have the right pull for your current brakes: https://www.amazon.com/Tektro-RL520A.../dp/B002EWEF3U

Shifters: https://www.amazon.com/MicroShift-Do.../dp/B00CJXMF8Q

You'll also need the bars, likely a stem, and cables.

In San Jose, LBS labor would likely be in the $100- to $150- range - their overhead is really high here.
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Old 09-25-17, 05:49 PM
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I think you can go for an STI Sora. Shimano Sora ST-3500 STI Levers > Components > Brakes & Shifters > Road Levers | Jenson USA

Though possibly you might need to get an older series Shimano STI 9 speed lever.

I'd certainly make in inquiry to Shimano support to be certain before purchasing. I just went to STI after 35 plus years of down tube and stem shifters. I very much regret not changing to integrated brakes and shifters sooner.

New shifters should come with cables, housings and everything you need. My Shimano 105 5800's did.

Last edited by Iride01; 09-25-17 at 05:55 PM.
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Old 09-26-17, 01:36 AM
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So, the technical answer that the minimum parts are:
-9 speed Shimano or Microshift road shifters, with a triple front shifter
-9 speed triple road front derailleur, unless you go with bar end shifters
-Mechanical disc brakes with road cable pull (no hydraulic options if 9 speed, and 10 or 11 speed will require more parts)
-Handlebars

Labor from a shop would probably be in the range of $100Ė$200.

This is a bad idea for a number of reasons. Ideal bike geometry varies between flat and drop bars, so it may not fit or ride that well. It'll likely end up with an awkward hodgepodge of parts. And it'll cost a lotódrop bar shift levers are really expensive, and the fact is that original bike manufacturers buy parts way cheaper than you can. It would be a much better idea, and you'd get way more for your money, if you just sell your bike and buy one that's set up as you'd like it.
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Old 09-26-17, 03:56 AM
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wow thanks everyone for the replies its really appreciated and a lot to think about.

The bike has mechanical disc brakes on it.


Thanks again everyone.
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Old 09-26-17, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by cpach View Post
............... and the fact is that original bike manufacturers buy parts way cheaper than you can. It would be a much better idea, and you'd get way more for your money
I can agree with most everything else you posted. However, I think this can depend on whether the OP wants to stay in new frames or a true lightweight vintage bike. New frames cost more than some very nice lightweight frames of the past. As well the OP's ability to do all the work with out having to acquire too many new tools will play a part.

I just bought a Schwinn Paramount frameset. I bought all new Shimano 105 5800 components, hubs, brakes, shifters, cassette, crankset and BB. All other components where brand new too as well I had to get a couple new tools. I came in about the same as my son's brand new Trek Emonda ALR with Shimano Tiagra 10 speed.

I could purchase another lighter frameset for less than half what I paid for the Paramount, but I wanted the Schwinn.
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Old 09-26-17, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by pjfamilyguy View Post
I will counts the cogs soon (if that makes a difference) and if there are specific details I need to get please advise.
What I would like to do is replace the flat handle bars with some basic drop bars as that's a more comfortable position for me to ride in
One major consideration is the bike size. Drop bars move your hands 2-3cm farther forward than a flat bar. So if the bike is on the small side, you're generally good for a conversion. If the bike is already too large, drop bars will make that worse.

The simplest solution is to buy a set of Shimano 9-speed brifters and a new triple road front derailleur.
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Old 09-26-17, 02:08 PM
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Originally Posted by pjfamilyguy View Post
The bike has mechanical disc brakes on it.
That is a problem with brifters. If you want brifters, you will need to replace the brakes with road disc brakes. I did this for mine, but I had V-brakes which I replaced with mini-V brakes ($30 a pair), Yet another drop bar conversion.

As @fietsbob and @nfmisso said, the cheapest option is to go with the bar end shifters and Tektro RL520 levers. This way you can keep the current derailleurs and brakes. With brifters you will have to change the front derailleur and brakes. Rear derailleur is OK either way.
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Old 09-26-17, 11:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
I can agree with most everything else you posted. However, I think this can depend on whether the OP wants to stay in new frames or a true lightweight vintage bike. New frames cost more than some very nice lightweight frames of the past. As well the OP's ability to do all the work with out having to acquire too many new tools will play a part.

I just bought a Schwinn Paramount frameset. I bought all new Shimano 105 5800 components, hubs, brakes, shifters, cassette, crankset and BB. All other components where brand new too as well I had to get a couple new tools. I came in about the same as my son's brand new Trek Emonda ALR with Shimano Tiagra 10 speed.

I could purchase another lighter frameset for less than half what I paid for the Paramount, but I wanted the Schwinn.
Yeah, your project sounds awesome. The op in contrast has an inexpensive flat bar hybrid with disc brakes. The situations do not invite comparison.
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Old 09-27-17, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by cpach View Post
Ideal bike geometry varies between flat and drop bars, so it may not fit or ride that well.
This is a deciding consideration for me. I only do road bikes so MTB's and hybrids are not something I know much about. I always assumed that the frame geometries were the same between hybrids and road bikes.

I also didn't notice that the bike had cantilever brakes as someone else pointed out. So that complicates things considerably. Or is that not correct, the one I just googled had disc's.

Originally Posted by cpach View Post
The op in contrast has an inexpensive flat bar hybrid with disc brakes. The situations do not invite comparison.
Inexpensive is the key here. If the frame is appropriate geometry and weight, then not having to buy a frame does let you build a better bike than you can buy. But only if you can do all your own building and are willing to scour the internet and be patient for deals.

But if the OP's frame geometry is wrong, and especially if the current bike weighs more than 24 pounds or so, I'd pass on major upgrades. (The 24 pounds is my limit, If others have a different limit, I've no issue with that.)

Last edited by Iride01; 09-27-17 at 09:48 AM.
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Old 09-27-17, 10:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
This is a deciding consideration for me. I only do road bikes so MTB's and hybrids are not something I know much about. I always assumed that the frame geometries were the same between hybrids and road bikes.

I also didn't notice that the bike had cantilever brakes as someone else pointed out. So that complicates things considerably. Or is that not correct, the one I just googled had disc's.

Inexpensive is the key here. If the frame is appropriate geometry and weight, then not having to buy a frame does let you build a better bike than you can buy. But only if you can do all your own building and are willing to scour the internet and be patient for deals.

But if the OP's frame geometry is wrong, and especially if the current bike weighs more than 24 pounds or so, I'd pass on major upgrades. (The 24 pounds is my limit, If others have a different limit, I've no issue with that.)
Occasionally companies will build hybrids with pretty much road frames (for example, MY2017 Trek FX 6s were Domane S frames, in MY2018 they built a unique frame for the carbon FX bikes), but typically hybrids have longish chainstays (often in a road-touring-ish range of 44-48 cm), slacker slightly slacker headtube angles, taller head tubes, and often many riders are fitted to bikes with much longer effective top tubes.
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Old 08-21-19, 01:09 AM
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I have done this transformation to my Giant Seek 3 using Microshift brifters and a standart dropbar and new cables and cable housings. I rode it for like 2 years and then returned to flat bars again. I realized that I was not a dropbar person, or maybe it was the wrong bike to do this kind of thing. But here it is:


Last edited by Newspaper_Nick; 09-18-19 at 04:49 AM.
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