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Minimum tools required when out riding?

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Minimum tools required when out riding?

Old 10-29-17, 04:38 AM
  #26  
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One of the cycling greats, I think it was Eddie Mercx, was a chronic fiddler with his bike to the point of making changes during a race - I've seen footage and there he was, loosening and adjusting the saddle while the peleton parted to give him some space.
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Old 10-29-17, 05:27 AM
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Originally Posted by taz777 View Post
Just out of interest, has anyone ever had to use their multitool whilst out riding in order to effect an emergency repair?

I can understand that tyre levers, pumps and tubes get used quite regularly, but I’ve been wondering what would need tightening up when riding.
Back when I used to carry one (before I lost it), I used a multitool chain breaker to help a stranded cyclist.

I replaced broken shift cables two times (my only complaint about the brifters I've been using for twenty years).

I used the spoke wrench to compensate for a broken spoke, to get me to a big wrench or vise.
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Old 10-29-17, 06:39 AM
  #28  
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The question is: "How often do you puncture?" If you can handle fixing your own punctures, you are at least 90% (probably much higher) covered. If you do an average amount of preventive maintenance on your bike, everything else (baring crash damage) is really rare.

I'm guessing the UK is out of the dreaded goathead thorn zone. Unless you have some other local factor that causes frequent punctures, I'm going to say that planning to fix one puncture will suffice. Whenever I've had two flat tires on the same ride, the second one has always been my own fault. Multi tools are a story unto themselves. Try tightening a water bottle cage with one. They have their place but the more functions they have, the bulkier they get and the more limited they can become.

That said, I'm going to say that the minimum is one spare inner tube and something to inflate it with. You can use a quick realize lever as a tire lever if necessary. I got along for years using CO2 and no back up pump. That's all that I carried for years and never once had to walk home or call for a ride.

On the other hand, what did I save myself? Today I carry a bit more "stuff". I stopped using CO2 when I discovered that 1 16 gram cartridge was not going to fill my bigger recumbent tires to operating pressure and I'm too cheap to use 2 cartridges. Since I'm already riding a 40 lb. recumbent trike, the extra weight of a multi tool or a couple of extra inner tubes seems pretty puny. My biggest issue today is how much volume of tools and spares I want to contend with. I'm not going to win any races today, but I didn't win any while carrying my minimal kit either. Carrying a little more "stuff" hasn't cost me anything.
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Old 10-29-17, 01:52 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by europa View Post
Having a gauge is definitely worth the extra because you can pump the tyre to the right pressure. Using your fingers to squeeze the tyre is only guessing and being on the side of the road is no reason for guess work if you've got an alternative.
I can't imagine in the rare chance one flats that precise tire pressure for the remainder of the ride matters all that much. That can be adjusted once home. If you often flat, that's another matter to address.
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Old 10-29-17, 02:03 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by taz777 View Post
I'm just about to order the Topeak Mini Morph. Is the 'G' version (i.e. the one with the gauge) much bulkier and worth the extra? It's only a little more cash and I haven't placed the order yet.
The gauge is *extremely* convenient. You only have to attach the pump once. Also, the little tab that folds down makes this pump function like a floor pump. Getting up to high pressures (>100 PSI) is much easier than pumps held with 2 hands.
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Old 10-29-17, 02:34 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by sweeks View Post
The gauge is *extremely* convenient. You only have to attach the pump once. Also, the little tab that folds down makes this pump function like a floor pump. Getting up to high pressures (>100 PSI) is much easier than pumps held with 2 hands.
Steve
Okay, thanks. I'll order it during the week. Can it be mounted under the bottle cage?
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Old 10-29-17, 03:37 PM
  #32  
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Absolute minimum for me is 1 spare tube and pump, but I also carry 2 tire levers. Never had to walk home so far - but I keep my bikes well adjusted and do preventive maintenance.
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Old 10-29-17, 03:39 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by europa View Post
One of the cycling greats, I think it was Eddie Mercx, was a chronic fiddler with his bike to the point of making changes during a race - I've seen footage and there he was, loosening and adjusting the saddle while the peleton parted to give him some space.
Some say he adjusted his saddle height to alleviate chronic back pain from a nasty track fall years before.
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Old 10-29-17, 03:45 PM
  #34  
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Since you say "just out riding" why are you so concerned about a minimum. Take a few more things that may get you home without walking.
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Old 10-29-17, 05:38 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by taz777 View Post
I'm just about to order the Topeak Mini Morph. Is the 'G' version (i.e. the one with the gauge) much bulkier and worth the extra? It's only a little more cash and I haven't placed the order yet.
My Road Morph G is out of commission and due for replacement. Might rebuy,...might go a different route.

The gauge is fine as you can watch as you’re hitting ideal PSI w/o pausing. However, checking for suitable pressure w/o a gauge is as simple as sitting on the bike and looking at the tire.

The foot peg is a good feature but prone to damage even when carefully used.

The o-ring on the plunger doesn’t like to get to dry. If you notice the pump becoming less efficient or suddenly failing to catch at all, lubricate the o-ring. If out on a ride, saliva will do. At home, silicone lube if you have a tube. When you have the plunger out, check for debris in the pump body and clean as necessary.

Speaking of the o-ring, I’d suggest picking up a spare. They do wear.

Regarding frame mount: Unless the design recently changed, you cannot piggyback the pump mount with a bottle cage. However, if you don’t have spare bosses to dedicate to the Morph, you can use the included cable ties.
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Old 10-29-17, 06:44 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by taz777 View Post
I'm just about to order the Topeak Mini Morph. Is the 'G' version (i.e. the one with the gauge) much bulkier and worth the extra? It's only a little more cash and I haven't placed the order yet.
Mini Morph
I have a Mini Morph. A very nice pump, reliable, and the hose keeps stress off the tube valve. I like the shorter size and weight.

No gauge is needed with this short pump. The pump is set on the ground, and you press down on the handle. When I'm pressing with my body weight, not just arm strength, it's getting close to 90 psi. I counted about 200 strokes to get a 25mm tire to that pressure. I'll often quit well before that, when the tire is full, but still softer than my normal pressure.

It even worked with my other bike's 38mm tires. Also about 150-200 strokes to get to a usable pressure (around 35 psi for these fat tires.)

(The longer body pumps are faster to inflate, and can reach higher pressures, so a gauge would be helpful, but not required. Might be nice on a tour, to optimize tire pressure. But to get home after a flat, only somewhat reasonable pressures are needed.)

One annoyance is their pump mount. They show it mounted on the underside of the down tube, which might work, but it will get dirty there. I didn't want mine on the bottom of the top tube, in the way of brake cables. So, years ago, I got a cage-side mount from Performance, and the pump fit pretty good with some glued-on rubber strips to tighten the fit in the clips. That clip is no longer available, but the Topeak clip for a different pump might work.

CO2
I get about one flat a year, and help out a couple of other group riders with a CO2 fill-up.

I carry the mini morph and a patch kit on solo all-day rides, along with one CO2 and a tube.
For local rides, just one CO2 and a spare tube.
CO2 is so much faster, very nice if the weather is bad, or riding with other riders.

This Genuine Innovations valve is very small, easy to control, and works every time. It needs a threaded cartridge.

Those unthreaded CO2 valves where the cartridge is inserted inside a cover seem to be harder to use consistently or correctly. On group rides, when a rider pulls out one of those, their usual comment is "I hope it works this time." I've seen them blast CO2 into the air instead of the tire.


A ride home
I should get a Uber or Lyft account, in case I'm stranded. "someday".

Broken chains
It's been many years and a lot of miles since I've even seen a broken chain. So I don't carry a chain tool. A broken or unusable crank or a broken frame is unlikely, but more common than a bad chain.

Last edited by rm -rf; 10-29-17 at 07:17 PM.
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Old 10-29-17, 11:25 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by taz777 View Post
Just out of interest, has anyone ever had to use their multitool whilst out riding in order to effect an emergency repair?

I can understand that tyre levers, pumps and tubes get used quite regularly, but I’ve been wondering what would need tightening up when riding.
Certainly. I have had the saddle nose push up on me after a particularly high jump. I had the chain break on a brand new bike. Had the left crank arm loosen on me me. After a spill, had to move my brake levers. And any adjustment to saddle, handlebars, etc, while I am riding for a better fit.
Now, that I have a bike with disc brakes, I need to get a disc alignment tool.

I see many say cell phone. I am not going to make someone drop whatever they are doing to pick me up because of a small issue that I should be able to fix myself.
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Old 10-30-17, 05:30 PM
  #38  
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Seatbag with Pedro's tire lever, Park VP-2 patch kit, spare tube, Nashbar Woody multitool, set of small allen wrenches (2.5-6mm), and a 9sp quicklink. Zefal hp-x frame pump. Woody has allens (including a 6-->8 allen converter nub), torxs (the two usual sizes for disk brakes), screwdrivers, spoke wrench, and chain tool.

Oh yeah, and on the longest rides I also put in my seatbag my burner flip-phone.

I've had to use the chain-breaker out on road and trail before. I've used 6mm allen to experiment with saddle height and tension. I've used allens to straighten my handlebars and/or (p)re-tension my headset. I've used the 8mm allen nub to tighten a left crankarm that was falling off. And of course no end of flat tires.
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Old 10-31-17, 06:07 AM
  #39  
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I really don't like to get stranded, and it seems that every time I decide to go light without tools (usually on a newly built up bike) I get a flat and end up walking. I also build and maintain my own bikes and do make mistakes, especially with frankenbikes things sometimes happen.

My kit includes:

Frame pump
Tube
Patch kit
Tire levers
Spoke wrench
Basic multitool
Chain tool
Couple of spare links and a master link
Spare brake cable
Spare shift cable
Couple of bolts and washers
Credit card
Cell phone

Like others have said, flat tires are by far the main issue. I usually use the multitool to adjust fit parameters. I have broken chains or had bolts sheer off (loaded touring rack) and it really stinks to not be able to fix such issues on the road. I've also seen several riders stranded due to broken cables or spokes. I like being able to help others and be prepared for any mechanical I might face.

All of these tools except the pump fit in a small top tube bag. Weighs maybe a pound. Worth it for me, even on my lightest bike which right now is a 20lb steel road bike.
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Old 10-31-17, 06:26 AM
  #40  
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I carry a tube, 2 CO2 cartridges, tire levers, a spoke wrench, and a multi-tool and a phone. Repairing flats is more common than I might wish. I once had a broken spoke and worked around that to get the rim straight enough to get me home. I really don't know that I'll ever need the multi-tool or have the skill to make a repair that would require it. Used the phone once. I was only two miles from home when I flatted but it was starting to rain and I just didn't feel like fixing the tire on the roadside. I've broken cables a few times, but that has just left me with a single speed so I can still make it home.
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Old 10-31-17, 07:08 AM
  #41  
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Expanding the discussion a little further, what backup plans do you guys have if you cannot effect a repair during a ride and you're several miles from your destination?
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Old 10-31-17, 08:01 AM
  #42  
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past several years, this is what I actually needed supplies/tools for
wheel removal (if not quick release)
saddle adjustment (crescent or allen wrenches)
tube changing (is riding w family check all bikes for tube sizes)
flat repair (tire levers & rim tape)
airing up (pump or CO2)
zip ties, small bolts w nuts & washers & electrical tape
I do carry other stuff/tools like small philips & reg head screwdrivers, locking needle nose pliers & chain tool
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Old 10-31-17, 09:06 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by taz777 View Post
Expanding the discussion a little further, what backup plans do you guys have if you cannot effect a repair during a ride and you're several miles from your destination?
1. Call my wife
2. Call a friend
3. Ask for help from strangers

About the last one - would you personally help a bicyclist who was stranded? Well, trust me on this, you aren't the only nice person in the world. There's lots of them out there. Lots and lots. Meeting other nice folks is part of the adventure.

Oh - and if you wouldn't help another stranded traveler, you probably shouldn't ask for help either. You are going to put out the wrong karma vibes so it probably isn't going to go well.
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Old 10-31-17, 10:18 AM
  #44  
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If you bring all of your bicycle tools, you will never break down. I think that's one of those Murphy's Law, things.
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Old 10-31-17, 10:21 AM
  #45  
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Yeah, I fabricated a truing stand to permanently attach to my rack, but I can't figure out the best way to carry my dishing gauge...
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Old 10-31-17, 10:29 AM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Yeah, I fabricated a truing stand to permanently attach to my rack, but I can't figure out the best way to carry my dishing gauge...


Jersey pocket. The chain whips will hold it in.
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Old 10-31-17, 10:55 AM
  #47  
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Good idea. Now I need to figure out, what if I've ridden to the 7/11, and I need to re-face my head tube?
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Old 10-31-17, 12:13 PM
  #48  
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IMO the answer is no time to whatever is needed to address likely needs on the road.

I routinely take the tubular tired road bike out for 200 mile weekends with nothing but a spare tire & pump.

The other bikes need tire levers and a spare tube.

I'll sometimes carry a few hex keys, but generally I expect my bikes to be reliable and take me out and back as much as a thousand miles or so without anything going wrong.

So, the answer to the question is to rephrase it to, "what do I think may need service on the road, and what are my plan B options?". Answer that, and you'll know what you need to carry.
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Old 10-31-17, 01:08 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Good idea. Now I need to figure out, what if I've ridden to the 7/11, and I need to re-face my head tube?


You won't. You already refaced it, on the way. That's why you learned to do wheelies, remember?
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Old 10-31-17, 01:15 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
I'll sometimes carry a few hex keys, but generally I expect my bikes to be reliable and take me out and back as much as a thousand miles or so without anything going wrong.

So, the answer to the question is to rephrase it to, "what do I think may need service on the road, and what are my plan B options?". Answer that, and you'll know what you need to carry.


Truly, if you maintain your bike(s), the only repairs you'll need to do will be the result of unforeseeable accidents. You can't plan around those; you can only guess. My luck? I'll guess wrong, nine times out of ten, so I bring tubes, patches, levers, and a multi-tool, knowing that I very likely won't need the multi-tool, simply by virtue of having brought it along. I bring a pump with both Schrader and Presta capability, in case someone else needs it, too.
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