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Old 11-11-17, 12:40 AM   #26
samkl
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OK, upon reflection and inspection I've decided to stick with the frame. Now: with the eyelets in the middle of the fork, can I really re-tap from M5 to M6? Is there enough material in there to allow for a larger hole? Or should I do one of the other methods suggested (besides helicoil, which would also require drilling)?
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Old 11-11-17, 01:12 AM   #27
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OK, upon reflection and inspection I've decided to stick with the frame. Now: with the eyelets in the middle of the fork, can I really re-tap from M5 to M6? Is there enough material in there to allow for a larger hole? Or should I do one of the other methods suggested (besides helicoil, which would also require drilling)?
I would retap to M6 on all the fittings you mentioned for a customer without hesitation and at pretty low cost. The 520 forks are burly as hell and there's plenty of material there. I think you may have overpaid (particularly given the damage) but it's also a neat, made in Wisconsin, frame that I happen to think rides really well. Shops vary plenty, but I suspect most will be down. Also I'd go ahead and make sure someone who knows what they're doing checks/realigns your rear dropout spacing and alignment, and realigns your rear derailleur hanger. Nearly all shops will have the right tooling, but some mechanics may not have much experience cold setting dropouts.
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Old 11-11-17, 03:12 AM   #28
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Retap the fittings for the larger bolt - much easier and you're working with the original steel, not an insert.
Re-aligning a frame is easy enough to do - Sheldon Brown has some help, there'd be other articles, or you can ask a competent frame man to do it.

That model 520 frame is an excellent frame - I owned one myself. It was spoiled by Trek's choice of components, but that isn't an issue for you seeing you're rebuilding the bike with your own bits.

As you've noted, the cost of something is forgotten very quickly if it continues to give you pleasure. You can build a good bike and learn a lot with this buy so forget the naysayers and forge ahead with the project.
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Old 11-11-17, 09:58 AM   #29
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Helicoil inserts are great repair bits, but for eyelets I wouldn't go to the trouble. Drilling and retapping to M6 from M5 is simple and the screw will be a solid fit into original steel. M6 bolts are as easily available as M5, even though the aftermarket usually supplies M5.

For something like a derailleur hanger, helicoil is probably the best path, given that you can't easily change the derailleur bolt threading.
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Old 11-11-17, 03:18 PM   #30
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Great, thanks all.
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Old 11-12-17, 07:23 PM   #31
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Should build into a real nice ride, I wouldnt let a few minor setbacks get you down, OP. I've always had some setbacks on every bike I've built, and with older bikes it goes with the territory.

Oh and I agree with the 'notorious cheapskates' remark as well, that pretty much describes BF members to a tee.
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Old 11-13-17, 10:28 AM   #32
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.
...when you live near the San Francisco Bay area, you don't need E-bay. This place is like
the elephant's graveyard of legend for all things classic bicycle. If I lived in someplace like Central Virginia, I'd probably be cruising the Bay and getting into trouble too.
LOL, I'm jealous of the amount of stuff that is out there on the west coast, but Richmond VA seems to have a good supply of interesting vintage stuff. Out here, it's either Beach cruisers, BSO's or Tri bikes, smh.

Re-tapping a hole from M5 to M6 is no big deal, as long as there's enough material. The eyelets on my Cannondale's forks are pretty thin walled, I'd probably do the JB weld trick, or through-bolt with a longer bolt and a nut. The Bridgestone and the Softride have enough to go M6 no problem. Heck, the Bridgestone's rear 'eyelets' could almost support another axle.

Actually, I added water bottle mounts to the Bridgestone, with expanding riv-nuts, only to find out that they were M6, instead of M5; it was no big deal to shave out a little material from the bottle cages to fit the bigger screws.
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Old 11-14-17, 02:22 AM   #33
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Considering the seller's discount for your troubles, I don't think you grossly overpaid. I happen to be a vintage Trek fan so I think this is a worthwhile project. And btw, after restoring a dozen plus bikes (each one of which I would lose lots of money on if I resold) I still got screwed on a Trek I bought a month ago with too much enthusiasm for the brand and color, and too little careful consideration and inspection.

So, write this awkward start off as a learning experience and enjoy the bike when you get everything dialed in. Building from the frame up may be expensive, but imo, there's nothing like it for bonding with your machine, knowing the nuts and bolts of it when repairs are needed (at home and the road), and for general pride-of-ownership.

And post some pix when you get it built up.
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Old 11-14-17, 04:49 AM   #34
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It came last Thursday, so 8 days ago. Can't find anything about the return window.
you have plenty of time. as long as you didn't open a buyer protection case for the 75$ partial refund, but if so you should be able to still call ebay.

ebay very rarely sides with the seller on issues like this.
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Old 11-14-17, 01:21 PM   #35
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you have plenty of time. as long as you didn't open a buyer protection case for the 75$ partial refund, but if so you should be able to still call ebay.

ebay very rarely sides with the seller on issues like this.
Yeah, but I've made peace with the frame's flaws. Gonna go full speed ahead and build something nice.
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Old 11-14-17, 09:53 PM   #36
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Samki,

It sounds to me like there are only some minor things to take care of on the 520 frame. I would recommend
going ahead and build it up the way you want. The Trek 520's are very reliable and stable touring bikes.
They ride very nice, not twitchy, perfect for touring or an everyday rider for that matter. Shoot some anti rust treatment inside the frame and fork like Weigles Frame saver and build it up. I have a 2002 520 which I bought
used a few years ago and love the ride. It has gone thru several upgrade evolutions. Today it has indexed shifting with brifters, compact double crankset, etc. I probably spent more than I should on upgrades but the ride is the thing to me and it is worth it to me. It is my favorite rider. I don't do touring but love the stable non twitchy ride. Very comfortable. Well worth the effort to build it up. Good luck on your buildup and give us some feedback how it goes !
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Old 11-15-17, 11:51 AM   #37
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I disagree that $200 is a good price for a 2004 Trek 520. Especially for just a frame. Unless you are the seller.

I don't think any bike more than 4 years old is worth more than $200. Many less than four years old are not worth 200
That's your opinion, but every day people gladly pay way more than $200 for 20+ years old frames. Think Cinelli, De Rosa, Pinarello, etc.
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Old 11-15-17, 11:59 AM   #38
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That's your opinion, but every day people gladly pay way more than $200 for 20+ years old frames. Think Cinelli, De Rosa, Pinarello, etc.
Of course it's my opinion. I don't have to ask others what they think just to spout their opinion.

Neither did what I say apply to every particular bike ever made. The brands you quote do have plenty of vintage bikes that can be worth thousands of dollars as well as models that aren't worth much. But just because it's vintage, does not make it valuable.

I don't put much value on the particular frame the OP mentioned. There are plenty out there. I see them all the time. Therefore not worth much to me.
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Old 11-15-17, 05:29 PM   #39
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I don't think any bike more than 4 years old is worth more than $200. Many less than four years old are not worth 200.

Neither did what I say apply to every particular bike ever made.
Um...actually, you did seem to apply your statement to every particular bike made. How are you not aware of that?

Actually the 520 frame isn't worth anything to me, but I suspect comments on market value would be more on point. Also, it seems to be worth a lot to the OP, and a nice one certainly has a market value that can easily top your $200.
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Old 11-15-17, 10:39 PM   #40
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...the last time I owned a bike less than four years old I was 12. It was probably not worth more than $200.
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Old 11-16-17, 05:09 AM   #41
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...I end up replacing a lot of stuff to get the bike I want, even when I buy a complete bike.
I presume you're planning on keeping it and riding it for a while, so I would not get too upset about any valuations you get here.

Most of the people who post here regularly are notorious cheapskates, anyway.

If you end up with what you want, and ride a lot of miles on it, all this will just be a memory anyway. Stay positive.

I don't know any one who has ever tried to helicoil a 5M threaded hole. I'm sure you could do it, but it's much cheaper and easier to simply retap them larger for a repair like this one.
I second this opinion. Right on.

Only thing that would make me worried is if the frame has rusted through - flaking paint and visible, lots of corrosion inside and outside the frame.

If that is not the case - some oil on the inside, new paint if needed on the outside and get it "packed" with gear.

Drill the current bad M5 holes with a 5 mm drill. Then tap an M6 threads. First make sure it's not a narrower M4 (very rare, but in that case you'd need a 4.2 mm drill and M5 thread cutter).
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Old 11-16-17, 09:31 AM   #42
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I enjoy tapping old damaged threads. Makes me feel like a skilled machinist, but it's just a matter of having the right tools handy.

I saw a kit at Lowes last week for about 15 bucks that includes a few taps/dies in the 4 to 7mm range.
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Old 11-16-17, 10:00 AM   #43
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I enjoy tapping old damaged threads. Makes me feel like a skilled machinist, but it's just a matter of having the right tools handy.

I saw a kit at Lowes last week for about 15 bucks that includes a few taps/dies in the 4 to 7mm range.

Yeah me too. I need to find a tap or thread chaser for bottom bracket threads. I am working on an old mountain
bike with square taper crank set. The threads on the crank side are in bad shape. I think the previous owner didn't realize they are not right hand threads like the non drive side Saw a video on you tube where a slot was cut across an old screw in end cap and it made a nice thread chaser. I might try it if I have an old one somewhere.
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Old 11-16-17, 12:09 PM   #44
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Yeah me too. I need to find a tap or thread chaser for bottom bracket threads. I am working on an old mountain
bike with square taper crank set. The threads on the crank side are in bad shape. I think the previous owner didn't realize they are not right hand threads like the non drive side Saw a video on you tube where a slot was cut across an old screw in end cap and it made a nice thread chaser. I might try it if I have an old one somewhere.
I've made a BB thread chaser this way, used a Dremel to cut 6 notches across the threads on a fixed cup. It works OK for cleaning and removing paint.
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Old 11-16-17, 07:30 PM   #45
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I've made a BB thread chaser this way, used a Dremel to cut 6 notches across the threads on a fixed cup. It works OK for cleaning and removing paint.
I have another bike that has paint in the bottom bracket threads, I am going to get the dremmel out and make a chaser too. I looked at the Park Tool BTS-1 bottom bracket threader/facer and it looks slick but I don't happen to have $600.00 to buy one. This thread chaser is just what the doctor ordered.
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