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1 1/8” fork

Old 11-30-17, 11:48 PM
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1 1/8” fork

Is 1 1/8” a Standard size fork for 700c?
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Old 12-01-17, 01:45 AM
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1 1/8" is a common diameter for the steerer of a bike, but so is 1", and 1 1/8 to 1 1/2 tapered. There are a handful of other standards. Other important dimensions for forks are brake reach, axle to crown, and rake.
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Old 12-01-17, 02:18 AM
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1" was standard for a century. Following the advent of threadless headsets, and as a prelude to CF forks, 1-1/8" became standard. These days it's hard to endorse the notion of a standard.
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Old 12-01-17, 07:21 AM
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Yes, common rather than standard. You can't make assumptions about this any longer.
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Old 12-01-17, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Yes, common rather than standard. You can't make assumptions about this any longer.
Yeah, the great thing about standards is that we have so many.
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Old 12-01-17, 08:11 AM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
1" was standard for a century. Following the advent of threadless headsets, and as a prelude to CF forks, 1-1/8" became standard. These days it's hard to endorse the notion of a standard.
Yes, 1-1/8" is superior for carbon steerers but I believe it was first developed for MTB use with steel steerers to provide better rigidity and strength to survive the severe riding conditions those are prone to. The first 1-1/8" steerer I had was a threaded steel fork on a '92 Trek MTB.

Last edited by HillRider; 12-01-17 at 08:21 AM.
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Old 12-01-17, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Yes, 1-1/8" is superior for carbon steerers but I believe it was first developed for MTB use with steel steerers to provide better rigidity and strength to survive the severe riding conditions those are prone to. The first 1-1/8" steerer I had was on a threaded steel fork on a '92 Trek MTB.
That's true, but there was overlap of a number of changes, including threadless headsets happening in short order.

Rather than get too deep into the details I chose to go with the idea of prelude to show that it was part of an evolutionary process.
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Old 12-01-17, 08:35 AM
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
That's true, but there was overlap of a number of changes, including threadless headsets happening in short order.

Rather than get too deep into the details I chose to go with the idea of prelude to show that it was part of an evolutionary process.
Perhaps you are correct in not going too deep into the details but your post is just dipping your toes into the details and gives the wrong impression. Carbon fiber forks and threadless headsets had little to do with the 1 1/8" steer tube commonly...I would say almost exclusively...found on modern bicycles.

Yes, 1 1/8" steer tubes is an evolutionary process but you are barking up the wrong branch of the evolutionary tree. If mountain bikes had never been invented, road bikes would still have 1" steer tubes. There is simply no driver to larger steer tubes on road bikes.
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Old 12-01-17, 09:01 AM
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1" steerers were butted , going to 1.125" they got to eliminate the butting, so it got cheaper ,
the tubes, then, could be bought in 40 foot lengths, that fit on the truck, & then were cut in needed lengths..



A Brompton Fork is 1.125" & threaded, folding stem mast is a 1" Quill .. 36mm headset wrenches used.

Quiz; Any one else selling bikes with a 9/8" threaded forks, today?




....

Last edited by fietsbob; 12-01-17 at 09:07 AM.
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Old 12-01-17, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Yes, 1 1/8" steer tubes is an evolutionary process but you are barking up the wrong branch of the evolutionary tree. If mountain bikes had never been invented, road bikes would still have 1" steer tubes. There is simply no driver to larger steer tubes on road bikes.
Considering the use of tapered steerer tubes on road bikes, and if bikes where only made of one material(steel), I would disagree with the above.
But the idea of "standard" in the bicycle design\manufacturing world is fluid.
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Old 12-01-17, 12:33 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Yes, 1 1/8" steer tubes is an evolutionary process but you are barking up the wrong branch of the evolutionary tree. If mountain bikes had never been invented, road bikes would still have 1" steer tubes. There is simply no driver to larger steer tubes on road bikes.
I'm not sure this is right either. As FB alluded to above, the development of carbon, and to a lesser extent aluminum alloy, steerers would have been an incentive to build stiffer, stronger steerer tubes even for road bikes and the 1-1/8" was a logical response to them also.

I think the current trend to 1-1/8 x 1-1/2 tapered steerers is just an extrapolation of the "bigger is better" school of thought and i'm not sure there is any real merit to it, particularly for road bikes.
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Old 12-01-17, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
the "bigger is better" school of thought.
Which I find especially ironic, considering road bike marketing is so focused on aero and weight. Why the portly fronts?
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Old 12-01-17, 12:56 PM
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Stiffness , bubba on the saddle need help with it.
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Old 12-02-17, 03:44 AM
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Originally Posted by SquidPuppet View Post
Which I find especially ironic, considering road bike marketing is so focused on aero and weight. Why the portly fronts?
Greater diameter will give more strength even with thinner tube walls. So overall weight of a wider diameter tube is lower than the weight of a thinner tube with the same strength (since it would require much thicker walls to achieve the same strength). This works especially well for aluminium.
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Old 12-02-17, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by leob1 View Post
Considering the use of tapered steerer tubes on road bikes, and if bikes where only made of one material(steel), I would disagree with the above.
But the idea of "standard" in the bicycle design\manufacturing world is fluid.
Tapered steer tubes in road bikes is a solution looking for a problem. They are simply unnecessary. I consider them to be more of a "me too" development. Mountain bikes have a good argument for using them due to the greater stresses that mountain biking puts on the frame, fork and headset but they are totally unnecessary on road bikes.

Back it the bad old days of 1" threaded steer tubes on mountain bikes, it was fairly easy to blow through a headset on a single ride. Road bikes never suffered from that problem.

Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
I'm not sure this is right either. As FB alluded to above, the development of carbon, and to a lesser extent aluminum alloy, steerers would have been an incentive to build stiffer, stronger steerer tubes even for road bikes and the 1-1/8" was a logical response to them also.
Road bikes have definitely benefitted from 1 1/8" steer tubes but I really don't think they would have gone that way without the advent of the mountain bike. Road bikes kept the 1" steer tube diameter for a lot longer than mountain bikes did. You can still buy new 1" forks for road bikes...even with carbon steer tubes...although I don't think there are too many 1" headset bikes still made. You can't find a new 1" steer tube suspension fork for a mountain bike.

Finding a stem for that 1" steer tube is a very different matter, however.

Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
I think the current trend to 1-1/8 x 1-1/2 tapered steerers is just an extrapolation of the "bigger is better" school of thought and i'm not sure there is any real merit to it, particularly for road bikes.
I agree. I wonder if it is more an attempt to make road bikes appealing to the mountain bike crowd. It certainly isn't a necessity from a strength perspective.
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Old 12-02-17, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by GoldenBoy12 View Post
Is 1 1/8” a Standard size fork for 700c?
In Short... NO. 700c is a wheel size, there is no locking in of that pairing.
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