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Noise in brand new Shimano Acera-X Parallax Front hub

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Noise in brand new Shimano Acera-X Parallax Front hub

Old 12-01-17, 10:04 AM
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steppinthrax
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Noise in brand new Shimano Acera-X Parallax Front hub

So I got this from ebay, sealed in the package and with a new skewer. I'm not to familiar with bike components, but when I rotate it, it makes noise. The noise is consistent. I took off the rubber dust caps and there is def grease there. It is brand new and has never been used. No evidence of dirt/dust etc. I suspect this is just the way they are. I'm usually used to sealed ball bearings which are generally silent. Do I need to "back down" on the nuts on each side. Or maybe re-pack the bearings.



Thanks
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Old 12-01-17, 10:23 AM
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Always readjust new hubs, they are alway too tight IMO
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Old 12-01-17, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by trailangel View Post
Always readjust new hubs, they are alway too tight IMO
And often skimpily lubricated. Pedals too. I always adjust and lube (if needed) before putting them into service.
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Old 12-01-17, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
And often skimpily lubricated. Pedals too. I always adjust and lube (if needed) before putting them into service.
Thanks,

Okay, so I'm going to pull it apart and re-lube. I know this is a touchy subject, but in terms of grease, what do you recommend. I'm just planning to use some Supertech High temp grease or some marine grease.

Also when you are finished adjusting, should it be completely silent?
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Old 12-01-17, 10:34 AM
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Originally Posted by steppinthrax View Post
Thanks,

Okay, so I'm going to pull it apart and re-lube. I know this is a touchy subject, but in terms of grease, what do you recommend. I'm just planning to use some Supertech High temp grease or some marine grease.

Also when you are finished adjusting, should it be completely silent?


Marine grease should be fine, there is no advantage in using high-temperature grease in bike service.


Not sure how you will adjust the hubs until they are laced into wheels....
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Old 12-01-17, 10:35 AM
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I forgot to mention to re-lube new hubs. I do that too. What grease you decide to use is up to you. You hardy riders in the PNW and back east might use thicker grease, and re-lube every year. Out west..... any lube would do. I'm in CA. I like Phil Wood.
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Old 12-01-17, 10:46 AM
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Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
Marine grease should be fine, there is no advantage in using high-temperature grease in bike service.


Not sure how you will adjust the hubs until they are laced into wheels....
I'm assuming you back off of the cone nuts on each side of the hub. This is a front wheel. I'm going to back off the nuts and slowly tighten them until the play disappears.
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Old 12-01-17, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by steppinthrax View Post
I'm assuming you back off of the cone nuts on each side of the hub. This is a front wheel. I'm going to back off the nuts and slowly tighten them until the play disappears.
Hubs are shipped adjusted tight to facilitate wheelbuilding. They should be adjusted until the play disappears when the quick-release is fully closed.
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Old 12-01-17, 10:55 AM
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Econ 101, grease costs money, so making a million things there is incentive to find a practical minimum ,

to lower production costs..

You can add more to the one you have...
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Old 12-01-17, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
Hubs are shipped adjusted tight to facilitate wheelbuilding. They should be adjusted until the play disappears when the quick-release is fully closed.
Never realized this. Thanks,

I did lace the wheel last night and this morning I "true-ed" the wheel. It was the first wheel I laced and was an interesting exp. I had to re-do it 3 times until I got it working.

I'm going to "back-off" of the nuts tonight and see what happens.
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Old 12-01-17, 11:05 AM
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Just loosen one side, not both sides
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Old 12-01-17, 12:01 PM
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Originally Posted by trailangel View Post
Just loosen one side, not both sides
+1. General practice is to leave the right-side nuts tight and don't touch them unless you need to replace a cone.
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Old 12-01-17, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by steppinthrax View Post
I'm assuming you back off of the cone nuts on each side of the hub. This is a front wheel. I'm going to back off the nuts and slowly tighten them until the play disappears.
You can make a much finer adjustment when you can see/feel what is going on out at the rim, firmly clamped into the dropouts (or an axle vise) rather than held in hand and trying to hold cone wrenches with your other two hands.
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Old 12-01-17, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
You can make a much finer adjustment when you can see/feel what is going on out at the rim, firmly clamped into the dropouts (or an axle vise) rather than held in hand and trying to hold cone wrenches with your other two hands.
+1

As for hub overhaul and preload setup, this is how I do it:
Bicycle hub overhaul - Ciklo Gremlin

For grease - marine is fine.
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Old 12-01-17, 01:18 PM
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An axle vise is a smart investment if you plan on doing lots of hub work.
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Old 12-01-17, 07:49 PM
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Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets View Post
An axle vise is a smart investment if you plan on doing lots of hub work.
I am glad I invested in my Stein axle vise, and recommend it. Stein Tools for Hubs, Cassettes and Freewheels
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