Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

New wheels or new bike?

Old 01-22-18, 04:52 PM
  #1  
willwebb
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 23
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
New wheels or new bike?

I have a 2011 Jamis Bosanova (a steel frame light touring bike). I have broken 2 spokes in my last 2 rides, and my bike shop mechanic told me that the stock wheel has basically run its useful life. Rather than replace another spoke, itís recommended that I replace the wheels. Iím ok with doing that at this stage. However, the bike came with disc brakes, but a rear spacing of 130mm. Iíve learned that the standard today for rear hubs for disc brakes is 135mm, and I cannot find a new hub for the bike.

The hub on the bike is made by Formula, and the mechanic says its condition is ďfineĒ. So, one option is to use the existing hubs, buy new rims, and rebuild the wheels. Iím thinking of Mavic A719s. With labor, this will come to about $425 total for both wheels. I don't think I'd be able to use these rebuilt wheels on any future bike because of the hub size issue.

Iím a little concerned about throwing good money after bad. The other alternative is to buy a more up-to-date bike (perhaps something like a Surly Straggler or Disc Trucker) for about $1500. Perhaps I could fix the spoke on the Bosanova and use it as a backup bike?

I'm afraid that I bought a Betamax.

Thoughts?
willwebb is offline  
Old 01-22-18, 05:01 PM
  #2  
bikeman715
Senior Member
 
bikeman715's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Salinas , Ca.
Posts: 2,648

Bikes: Bike Nashbar AL-1 ,Raligh M50 , Schwinn Traveler , and others

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I would replace the rims ,spokes and reuse the hubs . The other thing to do is get new wheels and the rear of the bike spread to the new width of the new wheels or adjust the axles of them to fit the frame , this by using and changing spacers on the axle and then re-dish the wheel so it be center again .
bikeman715 is offline  
Old 01-22-18, 05:05 PM
  #3  
Troul
:D
 
Troul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Mich
Posts: 1,577
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 15 Posts
might consider having the rear stays widened to accept the commonly sized wheelsets used today?
Troul is offline  
Old 01-22-18, 05:09 PM
  #4  
willwebb
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 23
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for the feedback. How difficult would it be to re-size the rear stays? Is that something a local bike shop should be able to do? (The guy I'm speaking with hasn't offered this up as a possible solution.)
willwebb is offline  
Old 01-22-18, 05:29 PM
  #5  
Troul
:D
 
Troul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Mich
Posts: 1,577
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 15 Posts
Yes, a lbs that knows more than retailing, upselling, & accessories should know how to do it & be capable in providing that service.
Troul is offline  
Old 01-22-18, 05:33 PM
  #6  
bikeman715
Senior Member
 
bikeman715's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Salinas , Ca.
Posts: 2,648

Bikes: Bike Nashbar AL-1 ,Raligh M50 , Schwinn Traveler , and others

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If it a steel ,yes the LBS can do it . If it any other like carbon or alum . can not be done .
bikeman715 is offline  
Old 01-22-18, 07:15 PM
  #7  
ThermionicScott 
hungry
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 18,609

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2105 Post(s)
Liked 143 Times in 116 Posts
You can always take pride in knowing that Betamax was the superior standard.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 01-22-18, 07:42 PM
  #8  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 22,541
Mentioned: 172 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8741 Post(s)
Liked 107 Times in 95 Posts
I think 130mm OLD is still the road standard for both disc and rim brakes.

https://thebikelane.com/product/bont...iations=121514

But, unfortunately I'm not seeing those with lots of spokes.

Are you only breaking spokes on the rear? Is the rim in good condition?

I'd talk to your LBS about re-using your existing rim (or at least evaluating it for re-use), and just rebuilding the rear wheel with all new spokes.

At most, just build a new rear wheel, and don't worry about the front until it starts giving you problems.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 01-22-18, 10:20 PM
  #9  
Steve B.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South shore, L.I., NY
Posts: 3,311

Bikes: Flyxii FR322, Soma Smoothie, Miyata City Liner, Specialized FSR Comp, Fuji Professional

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1128 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 29 Posts
Easy to spread the rear to 135 and I’d go that route, then just replace the rear wheel.

Just make sure the shop can check the alignment carefully so the rotor lines up with the brake. Bending the L chainstay might cause some rub
Steve B. is offline  
Old 01-22-18, 11:37 PM
  #10  
jimc101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5,466
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 297 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
I think 130mm OLD is still the road standard for both disc and rim brakes.

https://thebikelane.com/product/bont...iations=121514
130mm disc was a very short lived and is now a dead standard, note the newest review in the links is from 2014.

Even 135mm is on it's way out with thru axles becoming more common place, although it will hang around for much longer.

For the OP, what's the condition of the rest of the bike, would look at this vs getting a new one, vs the cost of re-lacing/re-rimming your current wheel, and how long you intend to keep the Jamis for, for it to be cost effective.

Just because a standard is dead, if your still using it, and it works, does it matter that its a dead standard?
jimc101 is offline  
Old 01-22-18, 11:40 PM
  #11  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 22,541
Mentioned: 172 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8741 Post(s)
Liked 107 Times in 95 Posts
Oh, another thing to keep in mind. It sounds like you rely quite a bit on your LBS. However, if you wish to fix it on a budget...

Buy a set of spokes and nipples.. probably $30 or so.

And set down and build and true the wheel yourself. You can do it with pretty simple tools. Or, find a good used truing stand for $50 to $200, and have the tools for life, and you still could save money over getting the set of wheels built.

It is a fiddly job, and don't expect the first one to be quick, but it also isn't impossible for a newbie. We were all newbies sometime... or perhaps are still newbies with wheel building.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 01-22-18, 11:47 PM
  #12  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 22,541
Mentioned: 172 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8741 Post(s)
Liked 107 Times in 95 Posts
Originally Posted by jimc101 View Post
130mm disc was a very short lived and is now a dead standard, note the newest review in the links is from 2014.

Just because a standard is dead, if your still using it, and it works, does it matter that its a dead standard?
What is the new generation of disc road bikes using? I don't think they're doing thru-axle yet.

Of course, the OP is doing a Cross/Touring build, so standards would be a little different in that case.

Lots of "dead standards" in the bike world... which are still very much alive in one corner or another.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 01-23-18, 12:03 AM
  #13  
Bill Kapaun
Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 10,835

Bikes: 86 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 679 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 25 Posts
I'd just buy new spokes & nipples and re-spoke it.
Likely the original wheel wasn't properly tensioned.

Maybe you could work a deal where the mechanic can measure the current spokes, and adjust length if not quite correct.
You order the spokes & nipples and swap them out one at a time, just running the nipple to the 1st thread.
Take the wheel to the mechanic and have them finish it off.
Bill Kapaun is offline  
Old 01-23-18, 12:05 AM
  #14  
jimc101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5,466
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 297 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
What is the new generation of disc road bikes using? I don't think they're doing thru-axle yet.

Of course, the OP is doing a Cross/Touring build, so standards would be a little different in that case.

Lots of "dead standards" in the bike world... which are still very much alive in one corner or another.
12mm x 142mm, like I said, it's becoming common, but 135mm will hang around.

A road bike thru-axle standard: are we there yet? - Cycling Weekly

year old article, but still current info
jimc101 is offline  
Old 01-23-18, 12:22 AM
  #15  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 22,541
Mentioned: 172 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8741 Post(s)
Liked 107 Times in 95 Posts
Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
I'd just buy new spokes & nipples and re-spoke it.
Likely the original wheel wasn't properly tensioned.

Maybe you could work a deal where the mechanic can measure the current spokes, and adjust length if not quite correct.
You order the spokes & nipples and swap them out one at a time, just running the nipple to the 1st thread.
Take the wheel to the mechanic and have them finish it off.
I find lacing individual spokes is a pain. So, I'd dump all the spokes and start afresh. There are people who will give pointers on getting started (plus you have the front to look at as a pattern).

You can also complete the build. I suppose a wheel builder would appreciate a "properly" laced wheel as a starting point, but I don't know how much that will save you.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 01-23-18, 01:36 AM
  #16  
Bill Kapaun
Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 10,835

Bikes: 86 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 679 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 25 Posts
Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
I find lacing individual spokes is a pain. So, I'd dump all the spokes and start afresh. There are people who will give pointers on getting started (plus you have the front to look at as a pattern).

You can also complete the build. I suppose a wheel builder would appreciate a "properly" laced wheel as a starting point, but I don't know how much that will save you.
I wouldn't replace them one at time either, but my post wasn't intended for you.
It was a possible low cost option for the OP.
Bill Kapaun is offline  
Old 01-23-18, 04:14 AM
  #17  
europa
Grumpy Old Bugga
 
europa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Posts: 4,229

Bikes: Hillbrick, Malvern Star Oppy S2, Europa (R.I.P.)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 370 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Sheldon Brown's article on frame spacing and, about half way down, how to spread the frame

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html

I've done this on two steel frames and it's easy, provided you take your time - it doesn't take much pressure to move things.
europa is offline  
Old 01-23-18, 06:57 AM
  #18  
Retro Grouch 
Senior Member
 
Retro Grouch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: St Peters, Missouri
Posts: 29,323

Bikes: Catrike 559 I own some others but they don't get ridden very much.

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1187 Post(s)
Liked 49 Times in 37 Posts
Lots of options.

Assuming that all of your broken spokes are on the rear wheel it looks to me like the issue is "spoke bracing angle". The dishing required by the cassette + the disc brake + the 130mm dropout spacing result in a relatively narrow spoke bracing angle. I see 3 choices: 1. Rebuild your wheel the way that it was - it's given you 5 or 6 years of relatively good service. 2. Widen your bike's triangle and install a 135 mm rear wheel - gives you the satisfaction of "improving what you've got. 3. All new bike - what we'd all like to do but it's more expensive and what are you going to do with the old one.

I like to jack around with bikes so I'd pick #1 but I'd relace the back wheel with 13/15/14 gauge spokes to provide a little more meat at the elbow bend. That'll keep everything else the same except for the part that's giving you trouble.
__________________
My greatest fear is all of my kids standing around my coffin and talking about "how sensible" dad was.
Retro Grouch is offline  
Old 01-23-18, 11:29 AM
  #19  
pesty
Master Sarcaster
 
pesty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: DFW, Texas
Posts: 527

Bikes: 2018 Allez Sprint, 2016 Trek Crockett Canti

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 190 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by willwebb View Post
... my bike shop mechanic told me that the stock wheel has basically run its useful life. Rather than replace another spoke, itís recommended that I replace the wheels.
Far be it from me to question a shop mechanic... which I do, and they hate it... But as others have said, personally I'd be looking at just re-building the one wheel with new spokes. I'd really question the "run it's useful life" bit on a rim from a disc brake equipped bike unless there are cracks or other deformations in the rim. The only rims that I've ever had "run it's useful life" and die were either because I pulled a spoke nipple through the rim, or completely wore down the brake track.
pesty is offline  
Old 01-23-18, 11:41 AM
  #20  
willwebb
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 23
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks so much for a lot of great stuff in the comments. I'm getting good advice and an education at the same time. I truly appreciate it.

I am calling the shop this afternoon to find out final pricing etc. I think I'm going to reuse the hub, and perhaps the rim. When the hub goes, I'll look in to widening the spacing if I can't find a suitable replacement at 130.

I am going to leave this job to the LBS for now, but I realize that I do rely too heavily on them. I'm going to look into learning more about bike repair so I'm not at their mercy so much.

Thanks again everyone!
willwebb is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
ch3n207
Road Cycling
27
09-15-09 02:35 PM
Snapperhead
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
3
01-01-09 07:12 AM
bluechair84
Pacific Northwest
2
11-17-08 11:08 AM
slvoid
Bicycle Mechanics
1
04-20-04 01:36 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.