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Continental GP4000SII too many flats, alternatives recommendations?

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Continental GP4000SII too many flats, alternatives recommendations?

Old 02-12-18, 09:57 AM
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maartendc
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Continental GP4000SII too many flats, alternatives recommendations?

Hey all,

I currently have the Continental GP4000SII tires on my road bike. Perhaps put 2000 km's on them. They are not worn yet, judging by the tire wear indicators. I chose this tire to be a fast, light tire with still "decent" puncture protection, but I am getting WAY too many punctures to my liking.

Maybe average 1 puncture every 150km, sometimes more. Recently I've gotten a flat on almost every ride (ranging from 20 to 80km rides). Maybe the roads are just rough around here, or maybe I am just unlucky.

Looking at the Michelin Pro 4 Endurance V2 tires now: https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...urance-v2-2015
Seem to be much better puncture protection, while not adding that much rolling resistance or weight over the GP4000SII's.

Looking at the Continental 4 Seasons as well, but that tire has a lot more rolling resistance, and only slightly better puncture protection than the Michelin. https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...urance-v2-2015

Any other recommendations for a "reasonably" light and fast tire with good puncture protection (better than the 4000SII at least)?

Thanks!
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Old 02-12-18, 10:00 AM
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I have had excellent luck with the Vittoria Rubino Pro III, over 20,000 cumulative miles with only one flat. They have been discontinued but you can still find them on eBay for under $60 a pair. Had good results on comparative rolling resistance tests as well.
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Old 02-12-18, 10:12 AM
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A puncture every 100 miles seems like a lot to me too.

Might the punctures be in the same place relative to the tire? I'm picky about lining up my tire labels with the valve stems to make it possible to tell. A frequent cause of punctures these days is tiny little wires from car tires. Those wires are so small that they are hard to find and, even after you do find them, they're hard to root out. I'd check that possibility out before giving up on your current tires.
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Old 02-12-18, 10:24 AM
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If you're already getting the wire or glass bits out of the tire, you may need to look at a heavier tire. Cheap, light, and flat resistant: pick two.


Actually it's more like: light or flat resistant: pick one.
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Old 02-12-18, 10:29 AM
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^^ this ^^
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Old 02-12-18, 10:43 AM
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In my experience, the Continental 4 Seasons has much better flat resistance than the GP4000. I often run the 4-Seasons all the way down to the cords without getting any flats (at least 3000 miles). With the GP4000 (on the same bike), I would get several flats on the rear tire before it wore out, but they do work well on the front. Haven't tried the Michelin.
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Old 02-12-18, 10:44 AM
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If your rims have a tubeless profile, you might really like road tubeless if you're getting tons of small punctures.

Aside from that I was going to say All Seasons. Pro4 Endurance looks good. Bontrager AW3 has pretty good feel for an endurance tire.
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Old 02-12-18, 10:53 AM
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Tiny, near invisible wires causing a tire to flat, has not been a problem here. What has been a problem is tiny shards of clam shells that get embedded in the rubber. Seagulls have figured out they can open a clam by dropping it from a heigth onto the paved bike path that runs along side the the harbor and the bay. I'm careful about not riding over broken shells but I also, about every week or two, carefully inspect the tires. Mostly, embedded clam shell pieces can 't be seen unless the enough air is let out of the tire to pinch it. Then small cuts will open up and I can see gleaming white and very sharp clam shell pieces inside. I've also switched tires from the Contis to Specialized Turbo Pros.
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Old 02-12-18, 11:12 AM
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I've been running Conti 4000SII tires on several bikes for several years. I get the occasional flat, but nothing like the OP's reported experience. 'May be the roads I ride, good karma, who knows for sure. One thing I do that I believe helps to avoid flats is I set the bike up in the repair stand after nearly every ride and wipe the tires down with a damp rag. Then I look them over carefully for anything that may be embedded. Tiny shards of rock, glass, etc. are fairly common. I "dig" them out before they have an opportunity to do something bad.

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Old 02-12-18, 11:15 AM
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^^This^^

Seems to me tiny glass shards are initially stopped by GP4K Vectran strands. But, eventually work their way into the tube. A deflated inspection with a bright light, magnification and a dental pick, has saved me from many flats.
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Old 02-12-18, 12:24 PM
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Originally Posted by rccardr View Post
I have had excellent luck with the Vittoria Rubino Pro III, over 20,000 cumulative miles with only one flat. They have been discontinued but you can still find them on eBay for under $60 a pair. Had good results on comparative rolling resistance tests as well.
Originally Posted by johnny99 View Post
In my experience, the Continental 4 Seasons has much better flat resistance than the GP4000. I often run the 4-Seasons all the way down to the cords without getting any flats (at least 3000 miles). With the GP4000 (on the same bike), I would get several flats on the rear tire before it wore out, but they do work well on the front. Haven't tried the Michelin.
Originally Posted by cpach View Post
If your rims have a tubeless profile, you might really like road tubeless if you're getting tons of small punctures.

Aside from that I was going to say All Seasons. Pro4 Endurance looks good. Bontrager AW3 has pretty good feel for an endurance tire.
Thanks for the suggestions! Will look into the Vittorias and Bontragers. I know about the Conti 4 seasons, but the Michelins pro 4 endurance seem to have a slightly better balance of rolling resistance vs puncture resistance (at the expense of higher weight than the 4 seasons).

My rims do have tubeless profile, but I don't know much about tubeless. Messing around with sealant and stuff seems like a hassle perhaps.

Originally Posted by BarryVee View Post
Seems to me tiny glass shards are initially stopped by GP4K Vectran strands. But, eventually work their way into the tube. A deflated inspection with a bright light, magnification and a dental pick, has saved me from many flats.
Originally Posted by Dean51 View Post
One thing I do that I believe helps to avoid flats is I set the bike up in the repair stand after nearly every ride and wipe the tires down with a damp rag. Then I look them over carefully for anything that may be embedded.
Dean
Well, it is true that I rarely inspect my tires for shards or anything, except when I am changing a flat, making sure there is nothing sharp feeling on the inside of the tire. Maybe I should do that.

That being said, on my commuter bike I ride daily have Continental Gatorskins, and I ride those on the same rough roads, treat them the same (basically neglecting them), and haven't had a flat on those in about a year (+/- 1800 miles).

I just want to avoid putting Gatorskins on my road bike because they are SO heavy! 300g+ each.
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Old 02-12-18, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by maartendc View Post
T

I just want to avoid putting Gatorskins on my road bike because they are SO heavy! 300g+ each.
25mm wide folding Gatorskins are 240g versus 225g for GP4000SII tires. It doesn't matter, and even the 0.2% slowdown a 139 pound rider on a 15 pound bike would experience climbing from 130g of weight is insignificant.

Your issue is that you're going to need 15-20 Watts more to maintain the same speed on flat ground, and can't have that efficiency on a more flat resistant tire because it comes from a thin and supple carcass.
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Old 02-12-18, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
25mm wide folding Gatorskins are 240g versus 225g for GP4000SII tires. It doesn't matter, and even the 0.2% slowdown a 139 pound rider on a 15 pound bike would experience climbing from 130g of weight is insignificant.

Your issue is that you're going to need 15-20 Watts more to maintain the same speed on flat ground, and can't have that efficiency on a more flat resistant tire because it comes from a thin and supple carcass.
That is true, I have the wire bead version of the Gatorskins. Did not realize the folding version was that much lighter.

Even still, according to bicyclerollingresistance.com testing, the Michelin Pro4 Endurance has almost the same puncture protection than the Gatorskins, but are only about 2.5 Watts per tire more rolling resistance than the GP 4000sII's. They also weigh about 245g each, so not that bad.

Seems like I am going to go with the Michelin's in the end, seems a good balance of increased puncture resistance and not that much more weight or rolling resistance.

Unless I should go with the Schwalbe One Pro Tubeless... https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...-tubeless-2016

Less rolling resistance, less weight (when factoring in the inner tube) and NO Punctures?? Sounds too good to be true? I am intrigued now actually. Might have to give it a shot, since my rims are tubeless ready.

Anybody have any guidance on going tubeless? Is it worth the effort of conversion?

Thanks!
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Old 02-12-18, 02:33 PM
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You are getting about 40 times more punctures on your GP4000S than I do -- I get maybe one puncture every 4000 to 5000 miles (6000 to 8000 km).

No shoulders

I try to ride in the right tire track, since the car tires kick sharp stuff away, and avoid shoulders, which accumulate debris.

The GP 4-season tires have more sidewall protection, against larger objects, fingernail size or bigger. I've cut a sidewall on a pyramid shaped piece of sharp gravel that I didn't see in time.

~~~~~

Locating
It sounds like repeated flats with a missed sliver. (Or, how how often do you ride through glass and debris?)

The punctures are on the outside half of the tire? If not, look at your rim strip, etc, first.

You may have a tiny wire or glass sliver embedded in your tire. Those are very hard to find, and wiping a finger over the surface often misses them.

I line up the tire logo with the valve hole (and even draw an arrow on the tube with a silver sharpie in the direction of travel.) After a flat, I inflate the tube to locate the hole, then line up the tube with the tire as it was when riding, and carefully inspect that section of the tire, inside and out, poking around with a very small screwdriver blade.

Pinch flats
I assume you aren't getting pinch flats -- 1 or 2 small slits on the rim side of the tube. Your Gatorskins wouldn't protect against this, but you rarely had punctures with them.

~~~
small punctures and tubeless
If you mostly have small punctures, that take 10 seconds to a minute or more to deflate, then the tubeless sealant sounds like it would make a huge difference to your flats.

Last edited by rm -rf; 02-12-18 at 02:44 PM.
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Old 02-12-18, 03:10 PM
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Originally Posted by rm -rf View Post
You are getting about 40 times more punctures on your GP4000S than I do -- I get maybe one puncture every 4000 to 5000 miles (6000 to 8000 km).

No shoulders

I try to ride in the right tire track, since the car tires kick sharp stuff away, and avoid shoulders, which accumulate debris.

The GP 4-season tires have more sidewall protection, against larger objects, fingernail size or bigger. I've cut a sidewall on a pyramid shaped piece of sharp gravel that I didn't see in time.

~~~~~

Locating
It sounds like repeated flats with a missed sliver. (Or, how how often do you ride through glass and debris?)

The punctures are on the outside half of the tire? If not, look at your rim strip, etc, first.

You may have a tiny wire or glass sliver embedded in your tire. Those are very hard to find, and wiping a finger over the surface often misses them.

I line up the tire logo with the valve hole (and even draw an arrow on the tube with a silver sharpie in the direction of travel.) After a flat, I inflate the tube to locate the hole, then line up the tube with the tire as it was when riding, and carefully inspect that section of the tire, inside and out, poking around with a very small screwdriver blade.

Pinch flats
I assume you aren't getting pinch flats -- 1 or 2 small slits on the rim side of the tube. Your Gatorskins wouldn't protect against this, but you rarely had punctures with them.

~~~
small punctures and tubeless
If you mostly have small punctures, that take 10 seconds to a minute or more to deflate, then the tubeless sealant sounds like it would make a huge difference to your flats.
Hmm interesting that you have such durability with your Continentals. Well I usually ride paved trails on the side of a major road around here, so road debris is pretty much unavoidable for me. Also the trail pavement is sometimes in bad shape.

Well you are right, I should inspect my current tires at the location of the puncture to check for any embedded glass or shards or anything like that.

It is definitely not pinch flats, my tires have adequate pressure and the flats do not occur after riding over bumps. I have had pinch flats before, but this is not the issue at the moment.

The flats I have are usually sudden and abrupt: I hear a loud PSSSSHHHHhhhhhhhhh and my tire is flat instantly, as if suddenly punctured by a sharp object.

Never mind the tubeless, I have been reading up on it, and sounds like you still get flats, and the sealant only seals temporarily. You still need to "patch" or repair the hole after you get home. Sounds like this is not really a solution for my problem.
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Old 02-12-18, 06:12 PM
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Originally Posted by maartendc View Post
Hmm interesting that you have such durability with your Continentals. Well I usually ride paved trails on the side of a major road around here, so road debris is pretty much unavoidable for me. Also the trail pavement is sometimes in bad shape.

Well you are right, I should inspect my current tires at the location of the puncture to check for any embedded glass or shards or anything like that.

It is definitely not pinch flats, my tires have adequate pressure and the flats do not occur after riding over bumps. I have had pinch flats before, but this is not the issue at the moment.

The flats I have are usually sudden and abrupt: I hear a loud PSSSSHHHHhhhhhhhhh and my tire is flat instantly, as if suddenly punctured by a sharp object.

Never mind the tubeless, I have been reading up on it, and sounds like you still get flats, and the sealant only seals temporarily. You still need to "patch" or repair the hole after you get home. Sounds like this is not really a solution for my problem.
A tiny embedded sliver would make a much slower leak. The hole is way too small to go flat instantly.

Looks like you need sturdy tires. They'll be slower, but the riding will be stress free.
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Old 02-12-18, 09:22 PM
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Originally Posted by rm -rf View Post
A tiny embedded sliver would make a much slower leak. The hole is way too small to go flat instantly.

Looks like you need sturdy tires. They'll be slower, but the riding will be stress free.
Thanks for the advice, i will be getting some more puncture resistant tires!

For sure, less stress. Hell, ill be faster on average not having to stop to change tubes every half hour haha.
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Old 02-12-18, 09:33 PM
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Would tire scrubbers be of benefit for you? They should prevent the shards from sticking to the tires and ultimately working their way through to the tube.

I run Michelin PRO4 tires and have had only one flat in about 4000 miles on them. I would not have had that flat if I wasn't looking behind me to see where my wife was and ran over a sharp rock with a resulting pinch flat. A higher pressure might have prevented that flat as well, so I really can't completely blame checking my six as the cause. In the midwest we don't have to deal with goathead thorns or shards from seagulls breaking shells on the path, so those are likely a factor in my favor too. No hurricanes either, just tornadoes, but neither of those cause too many flats.
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Old 02-12-18, 09:44 PM
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my experience with Rubino Pro has been great. new version has the same rr like conti 4ks, but they are sturdier.
i don't know much about tubeless, does your rim have spoke holes and do you need the tape? if you have holes, make sure your rim tape is wide enough and use powder on the tube to prevent friction.
did you try the tire on a different wheel?
cheers
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Old 02-12-18, 10:46 PM
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Originally Posted by maartendc View Post

Never mind the tubeless, I have been reading up on it, and sounds like you still get flats, and the sealant only seals temporarily. You still need to "patch" or repair the hole after you get home. Sounds like this is not really a solution for my problem.
That's not accurate. Tubeless sealant repairs pretty much all small punctures—maybe 90% of flats for the typical rider, and also does not pinch flat. They do not need patching in the future. It is possible to get large punctures that would be okay with a tube but are difficult or impossible to seal with sealant, hence the need to carry a tube. Some specific rim/tire combinations are very challenging to remove which is a genuine problem, but otherwise inserting a tube isn't a huge deal. Most setups need to be pumped up about as often as a tube. Setup may be difficult without a compressor or a pump designed to seat tubeless tires. You do need to add new sealant every few months—which can be very easy to do with a valve core removal tool—takes 5 minutes. Given the number of flats you are currently experiencing, it would absolutely save you time and energy over your current setup, and would let you run a very high performance tire (weight, rolling resistance, feel) at the same time.

Last edited by cpach; 02-13-18 at 01:40 AM.
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Old 02-13-18, 06:44 AM
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I switched from Gatorskins to Rubino Pro and also am very pleased however you have a very unusual flat mechanism.
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Old 02-14-18, 01:50 AM
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Originally Posted by maartendc View Post
Hey all,

I currently have the Continental GP4000SII tires on my road bike. Perhaps put 2000 km's on them. They are not worn yet, judging by the tire wear indicators. I chose this tire to be a fast, light tire with still "decent" puncture protection, but I am getting WAY too many punctures to my liking.

Maybe average 1 puncture every 150km, sometimes more. Recently I've gotten a flat on almost every ride (ranging from 20 to 80km rides). Maybe the roads are just rough around here, or maybe I am just unlucky.

Looking at the Michelin Pro 4 Endurance V2 tires now: https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...urance-v2-2015
Seem to be much better puncture protection, while not adding that much rolling resistance or weight over the GP4000SII's.

Looking at the Continental 4 Seasons as well, but that tire has a lot more rolling resistance, and only slightly better puncture protection than the Michelin. https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...urance-v2-2015

Any other recommendations for a "reasonably" light and fast tire with good puncture protection (better than the 4000SII at least)?

Thanks!
Just my 2c, as the Americans say, from my experience and point of view:

Continental 4 Seasons are a very good (premium quality) tyre - I've ridden a lot worse (and a lot cheaper) ones. Not sure you'd notice the difference without looking or being very precise on a stopwatch measurement. Comfortable, nice grip.

As for puncture protection, at least for not-brick heavy Marathong touring tyre types: the best protections are:
1. Looking where you're riding - avoiding debris, glass shards etc.
2. Using a tyre that is wide enough (if it fits your frame) to allow being run at under 6 bars of pressure. I've had problems with 23 mm tyres at high pressures when it's wet - they are so hard that even sharp pieces of rock debris can get stuck and puncture the tyre (even a one with "puncture protection"). Running wider tyres at a lower pressure has significantly reduced that.

Bottom line, I'd rather go with a wider tyre, that will grip well, be comfortable and have an increased puncture resistance, than choose a narrow tyre with better puncture protection, since the puncture protection will make it a bit heavier and less supple (comfortable) - also less "fast".

If riding through areas with lots of thorns (there are some on a local mountain where I live) - disregard all this and get a tyre that can stop a thorn from entering. Or if your streets are full of broken glass so you can't avoid running through it.
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Old 02-14-18, 03:33 AM
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2000 km on a GP4000 SII and you will start to get punctures

I prefer Specialized Turbo Cotton which are much better/faster and offer the same puncture protection as the GP4000 SII

watch this:


when you say that you are getting punctures, are they from glass/road debris or pinch flats? (If they are pinch flats, you need more air.

On my fast bike (Giant TCR), I'm running tubeless tyres (2017 IRC Formula Pro RBCC tubeless road tyres ... 25mm wide on HED Belgium Plus rims with Chris King R45 ceramic bearing hubs and Sapim Cx Ray spokes (amazing tyres and I will convert all my bikes to tubeless).... it's easy when you know how to be prepared and what to take with you

a few things to note about tubeless:
https://thecycleclinic.co.uk/pages/tech-page

quote:

Fixing tubeless tyres.

There is alot of fear about tubeless tyres but in reality they are the easiest tyres to live with. As not all tyres are created equal, tubeless tyre choice is important but the majority of tubeless issues, are user error - simple as that. Below is a guide to avoid user error. I have worked this all out by trail and error (alot of error on my part as well).

First of tubeless tyres should be run with sealant. Some insist on riding without sealant. Riding without sealant can be done on proper UST rims and with a few tubeless tyres, but I would not do it, too much flint in Suffolk to take that risk. There are many brands of sealant, Orange Seal, Stan's no tubes, Effetto mariposo, Zefal, DT Swiss, Schwable even IRC do one. they all work in similar way. The latex is in solution and mixed in are particulates so when you puncture the sealant is forced into the hole and and the particulates fill the hole that the latex sticks to causing a plug to form. Using CO2 on your tubeless tyre with sealant in can cause problems though.

Stans for example will turn in a white watery liquid when CO2 is used which is about as useful as chocolate teapot, in fact less useful, I can eat a chocolate teapot. If you use CO2 to inflate tyre just mounted add more sealant through the valve core, the tyre should remain locked to the rim so you can then inflate with a track pump.

Most brand of sealant I have tried do not mix well with CO2.

Of course because CO2 causes the sealant to separate it can actually help seal a hole that wont seal. I have used this trick before then added more sealant when I get back home.

Sealant dries out slowly. It needs to be topped up. I use effetto Mariposo sealent now mainly because with CO2 it does not turn into a watery liquid, the latex will fall out of solution but no water is left meaning when fresh sealant is added it is not diluted. I top up my IRC tyres every 3 months or so, or when I feel it needs it. If I am being honest I normally find out I need to add sealant if I get a puncture that seals only at low pressure. That is the sign I have left it too long. 30ml in a road tyre is sufficent. I drain sealant though the valve core through an open syringe with gravity or inject. I dont bother checking how much sealant is in the tyre normally I just pour some in because I normally leave it long enough there is little in the tyre. you cant over fill the tyre dont worry about that and there is no need to clean old sealant out.

If you keep the sealant topped up you will find it will seal most punctures (if not all) pretty quickly. You can get a fair bit of air loss but even if you drop to 30 psi you can still ride on that. so you can stop and faff with a small pump or continue riding and use a track pump at home. I have done the latter as I dont often have a pump with me I come to that later. This is the problem with 23mm tubeless tyres. The air volume is small and therefore the pressure drop is large before the tyre seals. Bigger tyres can seal at a higher pressure due to the larger air volume. This make larger tubeless tyres more practical. I consider 25mm the minimum size for a tubeless tyre for this reason alone.

Sometimes however the sealant just cant seal the hole. Most of the time that is because there is insufficient sealant in the tyre but sometimes it is because the hole is too big. At this point many people get out that spare tube and faff trying to get the tyre off, fit a tube while getting sealant every. Then swear alot and ruin their thumbs trying to get the tyre back on again. No wonder some give up on tubeless tyres after that. There is a solution though. In my back pocket is Loctite flexible superglue and normally Maxalami tyre worms (there are other brands too). The worms are fibrous strings with tacky butyl rubber that come with an applicator. Before the tyre goes flat you place the worm with the middle in the applicator and shove it into the hole. The Maxalami kits offer two sizes of worms for different size holes. Make sure the worm is properly inserted and watch the video showing you how. This will plug the hole and the excess worm does not have to be trimmed. The excess will flatten off and disappear into the road with in a few km. Sometimes a worm by itself is not always enough to seal at high pressures (this has been the case when using small worms in big holes). If this is the case get the flexible superglue out. Smear that over the worm and hole. Let it set then inflate. I would be wary about inflating to very high pressure straight away. I would put enough air in to get me home and no more. When you get home you will want to trim the worm if the excess has not gone gone already and you can then make sure there is enough glue covering the hole before trying higher pressures. Remember a 25mm tubeless tyre is run at not more than 90 psi anyway.

Worms are a permanent fix.I have ridden for 1000's of km on tyres fixed with them.

Sidewall cuts can be dealt with using the flexible superglue or worms. I would try the flexible superglue first on small cuts/holes. you may not be able to hold high pressures but you can get the tyre to hold enough air to get you home. One sidewall cut I got when riding my IRC's off road on a damp dark night (asking for trouble) was fixed this way. Initially it could only hold air for a couple of hours at 60 psi but I kept on applying the glue and after a week it could hold 80 psi indefinatley and the tyre did another 3000km without issue. As it was a 28mm tyre, 80psi was more than enough as I run those at 70 psi. If the flexible superglue does not work then try the worm.

Tubeless tyres can be repaired if they have a butyl or latex lining. IRC's tyres do, many other do not though. If you have a proper lining then you use a inner tube patch and vulcanising rubber glue to seal the inside of the tyre. For tyres without a lining you may need your superglue again to get the patch to stick. You can do this if your plug/superglue fix starts leaking air. There are tubeless patches too. these are often too big for road tyres but are thicker and will reinforce the tyre casing. The tyre has to be removed though so see if the external fix works first.

So what you dont do is fit a tube to fix a puncture issue with tubeless tyres. If you carry a tube ask your self why, the hint is in the name
TUBELESS!!!!!

What I carry;

When I am commuting on the commuter bike with two big panniers I have tyre worms, flexible superglue, a pump, CO2, valve core remover and a 2oz bottle of sealant.

When riding my race bikes I just carry flexible superglue, worms and CO2 and that's for 200+ mile rides as well. For long TT's I carry nothing mainly because my skin suit has no pockets. To deal with a puncture on the race bike I would first see if it seals, if it does even at a low pressure I wont stop and top up with air. I will only get the worms out and CO2 if I loose so much air that I simply cannot continue. 30 psi for a 82kg rider is enough. I have ridden 100 miles like that and simply inflated with a track pump when I found a bike shop.

The thing is even if I carry what I do on the commuter bike it still takes up less space than tubes and levers. I do not carry a tube or tyre levers. As far as I am concerned my tubeless tyres once fitted will remain on the wheel until they are worn out, unless I have to patch it which thankfully I have had to do only once.

So I hope that helps answer questions about riding with tubeless tyres. I have given up on clinchers with tubes and won't be switching back.

Last edited by dim; 02-14-18 at 06:24 AM.
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Old 02-14-18, 08:02 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by dim View Post
2000 km on a GP4000 SII and you will start to get punctures

I prefer Specialized Turbo Cotton which are much better/faster and offer the same puncture protection as the GP4000 SII

watch this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynD0Rwc3Ius

when you say that you are getting punctures, are they from glass/road debris or pinch flats? (If they are pinch flats, you need more air.
Yeah I just checked my ride reports, and I have done about 2800 km on the GP 4000SII's at the moment. I have been getting more and more punctures lately, so maybe the rubber is just wearing thin, even though the tire indicators say otherwise. I have also used them on the indoor trainer a couple of times, which did not do them any good either.

Thanks for the suggestion on the Specialized turbo cotton. I don't know, if you say the Specialized have "the same" puncture protection as the GP4000, that is not really what I am looking for, I am looking for a more durable tire that will also last longer actually.

Thanks a lot for the info on tubeless. Any explanation I have read regarding "fixing" tubeless tires (like the one above) seems like way more hassle to me than just changing a tube on the side of the road to be honest. I don't want to have to mess around with sealant and super glue on the side of the road in case of a bad puncture. I'm sure tubeless works fine for some people, but I think my needs would be better served with just a sturdy tire.
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Old 02-14-18, 09:18 AM
  #25  
rm -rf
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Punctures with worn tires
I've seen many reports on BF of increased flats with worn down tires. But that's not what I see on my own tires -- but I rarely get flats, so it's not a good sample, I suppose.

Thin tread

GP4000S tire thickness: 2.9mm, sidewall thickness: .55 mm
So the tread rubber is only about 2.3 mm at the most. I don't see how a 2 mm tread is that much better at resisting punctures than a .5 mm tread.

(When the two wear indicator pits are worn off, the tread is paper thin. These are useful to avoid throwing out a tire that still has tread left.)
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