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Repair Kit Advice - What to Include

Old 03-04-18, 12:55 PM
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Wookalia
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Repair Kit Advice - What to Include

Hoy!
If anyone has a moment, quick question.
Moving to Caribbean.
Specialized rock hopper and maybe road bike coming with me.
Outer island, no bicycle shops or anything but general grocery store or hardware store is close.

Want to take simple repair kit. Have no ability to build a bike shop in the bush.
I am bringing extra tires and tubes, and a pump. Have small roadside repair kit in under-seat bag on bike, tire levers, multi-tool (made specifically for bikes).
What else should I bring?

I had thought some lube or grease. Something to deal with sand and rusting. Patch kit?
I'm no bike mechanic, but if anyone could help with a list, that would be great.
Doubt there's some portable truing device or stand, but that might be cool if someone knows of one or has used one.
Thank you for any help anyone can provide.
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Old 03-04-18, 01:30 PM
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Your question, if you'll forgive me, is rather open ended. What is your level of mechanical aptitude? What kinds of issues do you want to head off?, etc, etc...

If you're talking about being able to strip the bike down to the bare frame to get at everything, that even depends on the type of bike--some require nothing but a handful of wrenches, whereas some require a much larger number of tools.
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Old 03-04-18, 06:52 PM
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Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
Your question, if you'll forgive me, is rather open ended. What is your level of mechanical aptitude? What kinds of issues do you want to head off?, etc, etc...

If you're talking about being able to strip the bike down to the bare frame to get at everything, that even depends on the type of bike--some require nothing but a handful of wrenches, whereas some require a much larger number of tools.
I don't know what kinds of issues I'll want to head off. I know there's a lot of sand and sea air, so I think lubrication would be a challenge. That's why I asked for assistance. I'm on a remote desert island as it were, and would like to keep my bike running good for a year. What do I bring?
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Old 03-04-18, 07:51 PM
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This is what I would do.

I would replace the bottom bracket & grease the headset before I left. Thorough check-over including new cables & housing.

After that it sounds like you have most of what you need, though you can always use more. Def. bring grease.
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Old 03-05-18, 10:09 AM
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Don't take stuff with you to fix stuff you don't understand.

If you know how to fix a flat, take the stuff you know how to fix a flat with. If you knew how to true a wheel, then you'd realize that the bike frame itself will work as a truing stand well enough for field repair. So don't take a spoke wrench, because you didn't realize that.

Any time you break down on the way. It's just what do you need to get home or to a shop. So flat repair is usually it. Next would be what ever drivers and wrenches you need to adjust anything that slips or jams. IE. seat post slips, handle bars are cockeyed because the stem twisted on the steerer tube during a wreck. ETC..

But as you said, you don't want to haul around a bike shop. So don't take stuff to specifically do things you don't know how to use.
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Old 03-05-18, 10:49 AM
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Post #5. But I have to shake my head at the overall tone of the o.p. almost sounds like they are being conscripted into the Peace Corps. Caribbean Island equals OMG I am not going to have civilization or technology for a year! I would advise a serious attitude adjustment prior to arrival in your unnamed destination. Despite your focus on self-reliance, you just might find yourself in need of the abundant resourcefulness of the locals to get your rig (or something(s) else entirely) rolling again after some freak mishap for which you were not prepared. This aid will be forthcoming regardless of whether you are irie or not, but your Karma will be much better off if you are.
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Old 03-11-18, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
Post #5. But I have to shake my head at the overall tone of the o.p. almost sounds like they are being conscripted into the Peace Corps. Caribbean Island equals OMG I am not going to have civilization or technology for a year! I would advise a serious attitude adjustment prior to arrival in your unnamed destination. Despite your focus on self-reliance, you just might find yourself in need of the abundant resourcefulness of the locals to get your rig (or something(s) else entirely) rolling again after some freak mishap for which you were not prepared. This aid will be forthcoming regardless of whether you are irie or not, but your Karma will be much better off if you are.
I am simply trying to do reasonable planning ahead and bring a simple repair kit, LOL. I think the need to be resourceful, adaptable, use resources there, etc., are all implied. That doesn't change the fact that I'll be on a remote island and would like to plan ahead a little bit and bring a simple repair kit. Caribbean island does equal 45 mile drive to only major store, which is only equivalent of small town American hardware store. Just thought I'd ask people more experienced than me what to include. I am thankful for those that responded, as I know everyone means well and is trying to be helpful. But what I actually needed was a quick list of what people would include in a repair kit for the purpose specified, rather than endless ruminations on everything but that. I was hoping someone might actually just post, hey, here's the 12 things, or 3 things, or 22 things I'd include:

2 spare inner tubes
Grease
Etc.
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Old 03-11-18, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Don't take stuff with you to fix stuff you don't understand.

If you know how to fix a flat, take the stuff you know how to fix a flat with. If you knew how to true a wheel, then you'd realize that the bike frame itself will work as a truing stand well enough for field repair. So don't take a spoke wrench, because you didn't realize that.

Any time you break down on the way. It's just what do you need to get home or to a shop. So flat repair is usually it. Next would be what ever drivers and wrenches you need to adjust anything that slips or jams. IE. seat post slips, handle bars are cockeyed because the stem twisted on the steerer tube during a wreck. ETC..

But as you said, you don't want to haul around a bike shop. So don't take stuff to specifically do things you don't know how to use.
Thanks.
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Old 03-11-18, 07:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Don't take stuff with you to fix stuff you don't understand.

If you know how to fix a flat, take the stuff you know how to fix a flat with. If you knew how to true a wheel, then you'd realize that the bike frame itself will work as a truing stand well enough for field repair. So don't take a spoke wrench, because you didn't realize that.

Any time you break down on the way. It's just what do you need to get home or to a shop. So flat repair is usually it. Next would be what ever drivers and wrenches you need to adjust anything that slips or jams. IE. seat post slips, handle bars are cockeyed because the stem twisted on the steerer tube during a wreck. ETC..

But as you said, you don't want to haul around a bike shop. So don't take stuff to specifically do things you don't know how to use.
I have internet access and reasonable mechanical aptitude. So if a part or tool was small and cheap, I might bring it even if I didn't know how to use it, if an expert said good chance might need it. Thanks, man!
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Old 03-11-18, 08:12 PM
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I don't think we were quite sure whether the question was what you should carry on the bike with you as you ride or what you should take to keep at your residence.

Caribbean is pretty vague for me to guess. I've been to many of the islands in the Bahamas but not with cycling on my mind. Don't have much experience with the other parts of the Caribbean.

Double check to be certain you know what you can take in without having to pay an import duty. That can get quite pricey for some things.

If you are used to things happening right now, then take some yoga lessons and learn to meditate. Island time is a real thing down there. At least for the places I've been. So if you need to have something brought to you from the other side of the island, be sure to have plenty of beer money so you can take refuge at the local bar while you wait a day or two for it. If you don't go with the flow, you'll stress out and ruin what should otherwise be a great relaxing experience.
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Old 03-11-18, 10:18 PM
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I'm thinking that you probably don't need nearly as many tools as you are thinking. You will be surprised at how much you can do with just a 5mm Allen wrench. Certainly you'll want a set of Allen wrenches. I'd suggest individual wrenches rather than a folding set because orienting a folding set sometimes won't work for a simple job like mounting a water bottle cage.

Depending on how you ship your bike, you may need a pedal wrench first thing when you arrive. chain replacements require a special tool and cassette replacements require some tools but you might choose to wait to buy them when you purchase your replacement parts.
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Old 03-11-18, 10:20 PM
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Small needlenose pliers and a roll of 1/2" medical tape.
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Old 03-12-18, 06:07 AM
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Wirecutter reviewed several home repair kits. Here is their advice, directly from their review: "Our top pick is the sleek Birzman Travel Box, whose array of 20 tools includes the five we think are absolutely necessary for basic repairs at home (tire levers, chain-wear indicator, chain-breaking tool, hex wrenches, and spoke wrenches) plus the four you’re most likely to “grow” into (pedal wrench, cable cutters, chain whip or cog wrench, and cassette removal tools) as you spend more and more time riding. Both the aesthetics of the tools—especially the Damselfly chain-breaker—and the materials used to make them (in this case, high-quality steel) are better than what we found in the other kits we tested. This is also one of only two kits to include a chain-wear gauge, the most underrated tool in the kit according to our experts."
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Old 03-12-18, 06:24 AM
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I'm not sure what road bike you plan to take but I'd advise against taking a "fragile" one, e.g. and ultra light carbon bike with low spoke count wheels and light components. You want a durable, strong bike that will shrug off minor events. Your Rockhopper qualifies but be careful of your road bike.
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Old 03-12-18, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by ArmyJeep View Post
Wirecutter reviewed several home repair kits. Here is their advice, directly from their review: "Our top pick is the sleek Birzman Travel Box, whose array of 20 tools includes the five we think are absolutely necessary for basic repairs at home (tire levers, chain-wear indicator, chain-breaking tool, hex wrenches, and spoke wrenches) plus the four you’re most likely to “grow” into (pedal wrench, cable cutters, chain whip or cog wrench, and cassette removal tools) as you spend more and more time riding. Both the aesthetics of the tools—especially the Damselfly chain-breaker—and the materials used to make them (in this case, high-quality steel) are better than what we found in the other kits we tested. This is also one of only two kits to include a chain-wear gauge, the most underrated tool in the kit according to our experts."
I'm not usually a proponent of packaged tool kits but that actually sounds like a good one to me.

I might or might not disagree with the chain wear gauge. If it calibrates accurately on a brand new chain I might use it. Otherwise no.
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Old 03-14-18, 05:22 AM
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I assume that you intend to use your bike to commute and maybe travel a bit. So let's say 5000-8000 kms/year.

I assume that you can travel to a first world country once a year or so.

I'd suggest:

1. Leave with fresh components (chain, cassette, cables, brake pads, tires)

2. I'd bring

. One spare chain
. One spare tire
. Two inner tubes
. Two patch kits
. Spare brake pads
. Fiber fix replacement spoke
. Brake and derailleur cables
. A multi tool that includes a chain breaker
. A good pump
. A spoke wrench
. I'd leave with two headlights and a couple of cheap led flashing lights, say, 2 red and 1 white. You may want to carry spare batteries as well

--

I agree that salt/sand will be a factor. Depending on how much riding you have in mind and how much you care about maintenance, I'd suggest that you cut two spare chains to length and fit them with Connex quick links. Would make it easy to rotate your chains regularly (weekly/monthly). Keep spares in a jar filled with kerosene. Lube prior to mounting on your bike. Rotating chains will greatly extend your drivetrain's life.

Last edited by gauvins; 03-14-18 at 05:33 AM.
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Old 03-14-18, 05:48 AM
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If you will be without a car for transportation, making your bike your daily driver for work, then why not bring a cheap, used bike as a spare. You say you will have internet..so if your first bike breaks down you get online....order parts and tools for the repair...and in the mean time ride the used bike. I'm sure there is some sort of shipping to the island like UPS, Fedex or mail service.
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Old 03-18-18, 06:36 PM
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Originally Posted by sal View Post
If you will be without a car for transportation, making your bike your daily driver for work, then why not bring a cheap, used bike as a spare. You say you will have internet..so if your first bike breaks down you get online....order parts and tools for the repair...and in the mean time ride the used bike. I'm sure there is some sort of shipping to the island like UPS, Fedex or mail service.
1. I am remote and have no easy access to parts. Shipping is insane expensive.
2. An extra bike is not feasible.
3. Thus the original post asking for simple list of repair items to bring. Everyone seems to have some qualification, and I know everyone means well, instead of just providing a simple answer.
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