Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Best cycling multitool money can buy?

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Best cycling multitool money can buy?

Reply

Old 04-14-18, 06:43 PM
  #1  
Obeast
100% Certified Beast
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 168
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
Best cycling multitool money can buy?

Under $100 that is.
Obeast is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-18, 07:19 PM
  #2  
jwh20 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Indiana
Posts: 105

Bikes: Felt Z5, Look 675 Light, Specialized Diverge

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 44 Post(s)
I like this:

Topeak Alien II Multi Tool | Chain Reaction Cycles
jwh20 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-18, 07:28 PM
  #3  
Obeast
100% Certified Beast
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 168
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
what about more practical versions where weight is not a major consideration but ease of use in repair? Most pocket size multi tools are quite compact leading to hand fatigue for extended use.
Obeast is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-18, 07:48 PM
  #4  
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 30,897

Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 931 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Obeast View Post
Most pocket size multi tools are quite compact leading to hand fatigue for extended use.
+1 Most carry-along multi-tools are intended for emergency use only so durability and ergonomics are secondary to light weight and small size.

To the OP: Are you asking about a tool for take-along or for regular shop use? They won't be the same tool.
HillRider is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-18, 08:45 PM
  #5  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
TimothyH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 10,470

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 135 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4521 Post(s)
Fabric 16
Review: Fabric Sixteen Tool | road.cc

https://fabric.cc/products/tools/16-in-1-multi-tool/


-Tim-

Last edited by TimothyH; 04-15-18 at 07:54 AM.
TimothyH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-18, 08:53 PM
  #6  
Obeast
100% Certified Beast
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 168
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 147 Post(s)
I do a lot of long distance for both commuting to school and recreation. I always have panniers so I guess a tool that I can use at the workbench but is small enough to fit inside my panniers (which are kind of big).

Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
+1 Most carry-along multi-tools are intended for emergency use only so durability and ergonomics are secondary to light weight and small size.

To the OP: Are you asking about a tool for take-along or for regular shop use? They won't be the same tool.
Obeast is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 06:25 AM
  #7  
dsbrantjr
Senior Member
 
dsbrantjr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Roswell, GA
Posts: 5,738

Bikes: '93 Trek 750, '92 Schwinn Crisscross, '93 Mongoose Alta

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 487 Post(s)
My choice is to reject multitools for the handful of hex L-wrenches, open end wrenches, screwdriver and Park chain tool my bikes each require, wrapped in a shop towel for quiet and to wipe your face/hands. The kit is lighter and works better than a multi-tool. Try installing a bottle cage with a multi-tool and you will see what I mean.
dsbrantjr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 06:30 AM
  #8  
Marcus_Ti 
Only Slightly Bent
 
Marcus_Ti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 3,691

Bikes: Roadie: Seven Axiom Race Ti w/Chorus 11s. CX/Adventure: Carver Gravel Grinder w/ Di2

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1359 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Obeast View Post
what about more practical versions where weight is not a major consideration but ease of use in repair? Most pocket size multi tools are quite compact leading to hand fatigue for extended use.

That would be the Topeak Alien II. All the other geek-tools out there have fewer tools that are smaller and less practical but lighter weight.



There is an Alien III tool...but due to materials choice it is prone to rusting. It is also more expensive.
Marcus_Ti is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 06:39 AM
  #9  
cny-bikeman 
Mechanic/Tourist
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Syracuse, NY
Posts: 7,404

Bikes: 2008 Novara Randonee - love it. Previous bikes: 1968 Motobecane Mirage, 1972 Moto Grand Jubilee (my fave), Jackson Rake 16, 1983 C'dale ST500.

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 442 Post(s)
Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
My choice is to reject multitools for the handful of hex L-wrenches, open end wrenches, screwdriver and Park chain tool my bikes each require, wrapped in a shop towel for quiet and to wipe your face/hands. The kit is lighter and works better than a multi-tool. Try installing a bottle cage with a multi-tool and you will see what I mean.
That's what I have always done. I can adjust what I take that way, as it differs radically between a 20 mile day trip and a several day tour. I did so even when there were more tools to take, back in the days of more hex bolts, calling for a 6-8" wrench and Y wrench.
__________________
There's no such thing as a routine repair.

Don't tell me what "should" be - either it is, it isn't, or do something about it.

If you think I'm being blunt take it as a compliment - if I thought you were too weak to handle the truth or a strong opinion I would not bother.

Please take the time to post clearly so we can answer quickly. All lowercase and multiple typos makes for a hard read. Thanks!
cny-bikeman is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 08:22 AM
  #10  
Aubergine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Seattle and Reims
Posts: 1,822

Bikes: Too many to list

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 379 Post(s)
Another vote for the Alien II. I also carry a few other tools, such as an adjustable wrench, on my daily rides. When touring or going on longer rides I will carry several “regular” tools as well, specific to the needs of the bike.
__________________
Keeping Seattle’s bike shops in business since 1978
Aubergine is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 09:43 AM
  #11  
DrIsotope 
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 4,632

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2119 Post(s)
Originally Posted by dsbrantjr View Post
My choice is to reject multitools for the handful of hex L-wrenches, open end wrenches, screwdriver and Park chain tool my bikes each require, wrapped in a shop towel for quiet and to wipe your face/hands. The kit is lighter and works better than a multi-tool. Try installing a bottle cage with a multi-tool and you will see what I mean.
Amen, brother. Quality, plated L-shaped hex keys are still under $1 each, and when one rounds off you toss it and buy another. I have the advantage of only having new bikes, so it's just metric hexes, chain tool, a baby screwdriver, spoke tool, and valve core remover.

I've bought more than my fair share of multi-tools, and every last one of them sits unused.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 09:52 AM
  #12  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 34,263

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 122 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4701 Post(s)
In my shop apron pocket is an Eklind [21171] folding metric hex wrench tool http://eklind.biz/20xxx.htm

everything is steel , Ive been using it for 20 years.. I have another with Torx bits in it now , also..
1 kind of folding tool in multiple sizes, but not a multi tool, that being a collection of different kinds of tools..

I carry it on my bike because its in my panniers with lot of other stuff, around town, so weight of that 1 thing is immaterial.




...

Last edited by fietsbob; 04-15-18 at 10:05 AM.
fietsbob is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 10:03 AM
  #13  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 20,276

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 69 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1775 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Obeast View Post
Under $100 that is.
A lot fewer than you think. The Alien that people have been touting, for example, is a very bad design. It's too wide and too uncomfortable to use. That applies to most of the pod type multitools.

Depending on your needs, the Full Windsor Nutter or the Full Windsor Breaker are far better tools. They fit in your hand better than most of the other combination tools I've seen or tried to use.

The Fix It Sticks Commuter and Fix It Sticks Mountain are also good choices although they aren't as integral as most "multi-tools". That's not necessarily a minus since it makes them easier to use.

Finally, there the Cool Tool. It's out of production but it was one of the first (if not the first) modern multitools. I still consider it one of the best. It fits your hand, it can be used for multiple jobs, it's rugged and relative compact. There was even a mythical and very expensive titanium version. I have several, including a Bob Seals original. I don't carry them as much anymore since the Full Windsor came along and I don't need the adjustable wrench on most of my bikes but it's still a great tool. You can find them on Fleabay occasionally but they are highly coveted and can get pricy.

A final word on the chain tool on most multitools. I'm not sure they are all that necessary. I've carried one (on the Cool Tool) since the early 90s. I've only used it once or twice. It's just not something that is all that necessary nor useful. The Nutter or Fix It Sticks tools cover 99.999999% of all my on-road repair needs.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 10:28 AM
  #14  
WizardOfBoz
Generally bewildered
 
WizardOfBoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Eastern PA, USA
Posts: 1,276

Bikes: 1980 Schwinn Paramount, 2014 Trek Domane 6.9, 1999 LeMond Zurich

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 423 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Obeast View Post
Most pocket size multi tools are quite compact leading to hand fatigue for extended use.
I agree, and think that there's an additional problem. I was out riding and my brake started rubbing a bit. I had just changed wheels and apparently hadn't compensated enough for the different rim width and very slight dishing difference. My multitool HAD the right tool (a hex key), but it wasn't long enough to reach into the brake to do the adjustment. So it was useless, and I would have been better off not even lugging the darned thing around.

I'm thinking that I'm going to find the best (light weight and reasonably compact) discrete (separate) tools for the top four or five issues I could face on the road, and just have those in my bike bag. This addresses Obeast's point, is fine for the riding i do, and has the added benefit that I don't need to duplicate tools by having one quasi-functional multitool version, and one proper shop tool.

For longer rides in areas where I don't have any support, if I did get an uber-multi-tool, I'd probably test it in the garage to do all of the tasks that might arise on the road and supplement it with a few discrete versions.
WizardOfBoz is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 10:30 AM
  #15  
MobiBike
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: PNW
Posts: 20

Bikes: 90's Norco Nitro, 90's Softride traveler, 90's Jamis Dakota, 84 Schwinn High Sierra,

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
A lot fewer than you think. The Alien that people have been touting, for example, is a very bad design. It's too wide and too uncomfortable to use. That applies to most of the pod type multitools.

Depending on your needs, the Full Windsor Nutter or the Full Windsor Breaker are far better tools. They fit in your hand better than most of the other combination tools I've seen or tried to use.

The Fix It Sticks Commuter and Fix It Sticks Mountain are also good choices although they aren't as integral as most "multi-tools". That's not necessarily a minus since it makes them easier to use.

Finally, there the Cool Tool. It's out of production but it was one of the first (if not the first) modern multitools. I still consider it one of the best. It fits your hand, it can be used for multiple jobs, it's rugged and relative compact. There was even a mythical and very expensive titanium version. I have several, including a Bob Seals original. I don't carry them as much anymore since the Full Windsor came along and I don't need the adjustable wrench on most of my bikes but it's still a great tool. You can find them on Fleabay occasionally but they are highly coveted and can get pricy.

A final word on the chain tool on most multitools. I'm not sure they are all that necessary. I've carried one (on the Cool Tool) since the early 90s. I've only used it once or twice. It's just not something that is all that necessary nor useful. The Nutter or Fix It Sticks tools cover 99.999999% of all my on-road repair needs.
I personally still carry my old Cool Tool on one bike, and the Fix It Sticks on another. It's fun to see someone else mention them. I've had the Aliens for a long time too, and while I keep them, I don't actually ever use them much if ever, ... But your post of the Nutter reminds me of the Topeak Prep25, and I have other kits from them that get carried and used.
MobiBike is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 11:02 AM
  #16  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
TimothyH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 10,470

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 135 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4521 Post(s)
I don't know why using multi tools for extended periods or how well it fits one's hand is a persistent topic.

They are meant for emergencies and are not designed for comfort over extended periods of use. It really doesn't matter how comfortable it is as long as it gets you to your destination.

It amazes me that riders who can climb mountains, endure freezing and sweltering temperatures and ride 200 miles on gravel reject a multi-tool because it is not perfectly comfortable. It's like the guys on the body building forums who are tough enough to bench press 350 lb but they can't choke down a protein drink because it doesn't have the perfect consistency.

Using the best tires, saddles and chamois are one thing but in the world of multi-tools, sufficiency is enough. It just has to be reasonably light, fit on the bike and get the job done, that's all.

Those who can't withstand twelve seconds of less than perfect comfort while fixing a bike on the side of the road should consider switching to fishing or golf.


-Tim-
TimothyH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 11:03 AM
  #17  
n0+4c|u3 
a fish on a bicycle
 
n0+4c|u3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Central Valley, California
Posts: 724

Bikes: 1991 KHS Montana Comp, 1990 Specialized RockHopper, 1996 Specialized HardRock, 1996 Specialized RockHopper, 1965 Schwinn Typhoon, 1954 Schwinn Wasp, Late 90's Huffy Manbrook (Cranbrook), 1989 Bianchi Super Grizzly

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 270 Post(s)
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
In my shop apron pocket is an Eklind [21171] folding metric hex wrench tool http://eklind.biz/20xxx.htm

everything is steel , Ive been using it for 20 years.. I have another with Torx bits in it now , also..
1 kind of folding tool in multiple sizes, but not a multi tool, that being a collection of different kinds of tools.
^This.
I carry one of these (literally have 5 of them) everywhere.
Also my favorite Stanley crescent type wrench https://www.ebay.com/itm/STANLEY-5HL...h/112024973200
and my tiny park chain tool.
__________________
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
This forum is not "everybody" but a few people's Opinions ... carry on..
n0+4c|u3 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 11:59 AM
  #18  
Ironfish653
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Virginia Beach
Posts: 557

Bikes: 1997 Cannondale, 1976 Bridgestone, 1998 Softride

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 170 Post(s)
The tools I carry on the bike are the 'get me home' -only tools.
A 4, 5, and 6mm Allen key will cover 95% of the things you'd need to do on any LBS-grade bike that's been built in the last 25 years.
On the road, it's pretty much limited to bars/stem/saddle adjustments, with the occasional tweak to brakes or controls in the case of an 'incident.' Anything more than that, and I'm calling for a pick-up.

I pack a Crank Bros. m5, and an old Ritchey CPR-9, since it has an amazing chain tool, for something so small and light. Together, they take up about as much room as a half-eaten Clif bar.

I don't know where the notion comes from that one needs to be prepared to pull crank arms, swap cassettes, or re-lace a wheel every time you go out.

I get if you're doing a long distance, unsupported tour, that one might want to bring along a little more repair capability. I recall that we carried a little more equipment on 'epic' MTB rides, since crashing was much more likely, and that we would still be several miles from a 'rescue' pick-up point in that event.


*Actually, my vintage bike doesn't pack a multi-tool. Just the 4,5,6mm keys and a 4" adjustable wrench. The rear wheel bolts on, and the seat and bar clamps are also hex-heads, so it makes sense there.
Other than the hubs and BB, those are essentially the same tools i used to rebuild that entire bike.
Ironfish653 is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 06:49 PM
  #19  
MobiBike
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: PNW
Posts: 20

Bikes: 90's Norco Nitro, 90's Softride traveler, 90's Jamis Dakota, 84 Schwinn High Sierra,

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
I don't know why using multi tools for extended periods or how well it fits one's hand is a persistent topic.

They are meant for emergencies and are not designed for comfort over extended periods of use. It really doesn't matter how comfortable it is as long as it gets you to your destination.

It amazes me that riders who can climb mountains, endure freezing and sweltering temperatures and ride 200 miles on gravel reject a multi-tool because it is not perfectly comfortable. It's like the guys on the body building forums who are tough enough to bench press 350 lb but they can't choke down a protein drink because it doesn't have the perfect consistency.

Using the best tires, saddles and chamois are one thing but in the world of multi-tools, sufficiency is enough. It just has to be reasonably light, fit on the bike and get the job done, that's all.

Those who can't withstand twelve seconds of less than perfect comfort while fixing a bike on the side of the road should consider switching to fishing or golf.


-Tim-
Oh man, this almost brought tears of laughter to my eyes. Thanks Tim I agree with you!; but getting others opinions on tools of any type is always a fun thing and I always seem to learn something even if I already knew it all before hand. I have a medical issue related to EMF frequency that could cause horrible pain using any tool, so comfort can be an issue, but each has a different idea what that is anyway, anyway.
MobiBike is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 07:04 PM
  #20  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
TimothyH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 10,470

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 135 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4521 Post(s)
Originally Posted by MobiBike View Post
Oh man, this almost brought tears of laughter to my eyes. Thanks Tim I agree with you!; but getting others opinions on tools of any type is always a fun thing and I always seem to learn something even if I already knew it all before hand. I have a medical issue related to EMF frequency that could cause horrible pain using any tool, so comfort can be an issue, but each has a different idea what that is anyway, anyway.
Alright, fair enough, and to tell the truth, the Full Windsor Nutter thing linked above is a pretty nice tool.

I really want one just so everyone can admire it when I whip it out during a group ride.


-Tim-
TimothyH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-18, 09:54 PM
  #21  
f4rrest 
Farmer tan
 
f4rrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 7,629

Bikes: Allez, SuperSix Evo

Mentioned: 35 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2663 Post(s)
A couple Allen keys and park spoke wrench are all I've needed.

They weigh less and work better than bulky multi tools.

Pro tip: keep a park spoke wrench on your keyring.
f4rrest is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-18, 12:07 AM
  #22  
ColonelSanders
Senior Member
 
ColonelSanders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,488

Bikes: 2017 Merida Big Nine XT Edition, 2016 Giant Toughroad SLR 2, 1995 Trek 830

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 992 Post(s)
Do you guys think that having a small knife to cut whatever, is a crucial item of a bike's toolkit that you should carry on the road with you?
ColonelSanders is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-18, 05:48 AM
  #23  
Koyote
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 218
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 112 Post(s)
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
I don't know why using multi tools for extended periods or how well it fits one's hand is a persistent topic.

They are meant for emergencies and are not designed for comfort over extended periods of use. It really doesn't matter how comfortable it is as long as it gets you to your destination.


It amazes me that riders who can climb mountains, endure freezing and sweltering temperatures and ride 200 miles on gravel reject a multi-tool because it is not perfectly comfortable. It's like the guys on the body building forums who are tough enough to bench press 350 lb but they can't choke down a protein drink because it doesn't have the perfect consistency.

Using the best tires, saddles and chamois are one thing but in the world of multi-tools, sufficiency is enough. It just has to be reasonably light, fit on the bike and get the job done, that's all.

Those who can't withstand twelve seconds of less than perfect comfort while fixing a bike on the side of the road should consider switching to fishing or golf.


-Tim-
This.

My multitools permanently reside in saddlebags and handlebar bags and are only used when away from home. I use proper tools at home.
Koyote is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-18, 06:53 AM
  #24  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 20,276

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 69 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1775 Post(s)
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
I don't know why using multi tools for extended periods or how well it fits one's hand is a persistent topic.

They are meant for emergencies and are not designed for comfort over extended periods of use. It really doesn't matter how comfortable it is as long as it gets you to your destination.
How a tool fits in your hand isn't always about comfort. It's about use. A tool that fits awkwardly in your hand is a tool that is awkward to use. The Alien, for example, is wide and the tool bits are stubby. It's difficult to line up the tool with the fastener properly but the bigger problem is that your hand is holding this wide bit of metal which makes lining up the tool even more difficult because your hand is in the way.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-18, 06:56 AM
  #25  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 20,276

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 69 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1775 Post(s)
Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
Do you guys think that having a small knife to cut whatever, is a crucial item of a bike's toolkit that you should carry on the road with you?
Since I always carry a pocket knife, this isn't a concern for me. But, in general, they come in handy. Keep them sharp!
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Terms of Service