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Do I need to lube my chain/cassette again?

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Do I need to lube my chain/cassette again?

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Old 05-01-18, 09:53 PM
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shine2000
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Do I need to lube my chain/cassette again?

so i just degressed my 7 speed bike chain(didnt take off chain) and cassette(or wheel) and made sure to clean the chain thoroughly with a rag and wash off excess off the chain and cassette.
i then lubed the chain and cassette and let it dry and with white lightning wax dry lube.the chain/cassete but i think mostly the chain i can hear squeeking noises.
should i apply some more lube?
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Old 05-01-18, 10:06 PM
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The cassette itself doesn't need lubing, so that'll save you some time in the future.
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Old 05-01-18, 10:33 PM
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Squeaking is usually chain links that are dry inside their bushings/side plates. Sometimes the noise can be from the der pulleys, especially if solvent found it's way in their bushings. Adding lube to a chain when it's insides are still loaded with solvent can result in a dry inside after the solvent finally dries out. Especially if a solid lube is used (wax). The solvent will prevent the wax and it's vehicle from entering the still wet insides but both the vehicle and solvent will dry off in time leaving wax not inside the link. It can be easy to assume a dry outside of the chain equals a dry inside.

My analogy is a bottle having been rinsed out. The outside will dry off very soon and beads of water will remain inside for a lot longer. Andy
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Old 05-02-18, 08:49 AM
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Back to the question, if the chain's squeaking, it needs lube.

White Lightning is better than WD-40, but not much IMHO. Still, squirt some on the inside of the chain as you backpedal, give the cranks an extra spin or two to distribute it, and let it dry.
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Old 05-02-18, 10:10 AM
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If you used WD-40 or some other solvent to degrease your chain, you need to make sure you get that crap out of it before you lube it. Unless your chain is REALLY bad (IE: rusty), all you should need is soap, water and a good brush. Any solvent (IE: WD-40) that's still inside the chain after you clean it will just serve to break down the lube.

Personally, I keep solvents like WD-40 as far away from my bike as possible. Not only is it a solvent, but it's a water repellant, so it's hard to get off. If I really need something stronger than ordinary dish soap and water I'll break out the Simple Green, but I never use a cleaner that won't rinse off with water.
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Old 05-02-18, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by pesty View Post
If you used WD-40 or some other solvent to degrease your chain, you need to make sure you get that crap out of it before you lube it. Unless your chain is REALLY bad (IE: rusty), all you should need is soap, water and a good brush. Any solvent (IE: WD-40) that's still inside the chain after you clean it will just serve to break down the lube.

Personally, I keep solvents like WD-40 as far away from my bike as possible. Not only is it a solvent, but it's a water repellant, so it's hard to get off. If I really need something stronger than ordinary dish soap and water I'll break out the Simple Green, but I never use a cleaner that won't rinse off with water.
However bad you think WD-40 is for a steel chain, water is worse.
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Old 05-02-18, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
However bad you think WD-40 is for a steel chain, water is worse.
That's why you need to dry and lube your chain. A properly cleaned and lubed chain is going to last a lot longer than the metal on metal that WD-40 is going to leave you. It's a solvent and not a sufficient lubricant for a chain or bearings. While they advertise it as a lubricant, that's for the likes of the hinges of tools, doors, etc. That being said, WD-40 does make a chain lube, but it's very different from the big blue can everyone thinks of.
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Old 05-02-18, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by shine2000 View Post
so i just degressed my 7 speed bike chain(didnt take off chain) and cassette(or wheel) and made sure to clean the chain thoroughly with a rag and wash off excess off the chain and cassette.
i then lubed the chain and cassette and let it dry and with white lightning wax dry lube.the chain/cassete but i think mostly the chain i can hear squeeking noises.
should i apply some more lube?
white lightning is very difficult to apply correctly so it quiets the chain. Follow the directions exactly as suggested on the bottle & this might help. But most likely the innards of your chain are still holding the remnants of what you cleaned it with. If you want a dry wax lube you might check out the Molten Speed Wax page. Melted wax in a crock pot I believe may ensure much better penetration.
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Old 05-02-18, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by pesty View Post
That's why you need to dry and lube your chain. A properly cleaned and lubed chain is going to last a lot longer than the metal on metal that WD-40 is going to leave you. It's a solvent and not a sufficient lubricant for a chain or bearings. While they advertise it as a lubricant, that's for the likes of the hinges of tools, doors, etc. That being said, WD-40 does make a chain lube, but it's very different from the big blue can everyone thinks of.
*You* might need to dry your chain, I avoid it by not using water to clean chains in the first place. WD-40 is just solvents and light oil -- if it doesn't completely evaporate from a chain after cleaning, it'll just mix with any wet lube you apply and the sky won't fall. (Fun fact: most commercially-available chain lubes are just oil and solvent mixed together to help them flow into the chain easier.)
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Old 05-02-18, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
*You* might need to dry your chain, I avoid it by not using water to clean chains in the first place. WD-40 is just solvents and light oil -- if it doesn't completely evaporate from a chain after cleaning, it'll just mix with any wet lube you apply and the sky won't fall. (Fun fact: most commercially-available chain lubes are just oil and solvent mixed together to help them flow into the chain easier.)
Whatever floats your boat. I'm just trying to dispel the notion that some people have that if you give your chain a shot of WD-40 your'e good to go. A properly maintained bike doesn't need solvents anywhere near it.
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Old 05-02-18, 11:31 AM
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Originally Posted by pesty View Post
Whatever floats your boat. I'm just trying to dispel the notion that some people have that if you give your chain a shot of WD-40 your'e good to go. A properly maintained bike doesn't need solvents anywhere near it.
You have the right to your opinions and practices, but neither of these are facts. While not my choice, WD-40 can be an okay chain lubricant if applied on a regular basis. Similarly, solvents (I think you must be referring to organic solvents, since water itself classifies as a solvent) are nothing to be afraid of, and do a fantastic job of cleaning bike parts.
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Old 05-02-18, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
You have the right to your opinions and practices, but neither of these are facts. While not my choice, WD-40 can be an okay chain lubricant if applied on a regular basis. Similarly, solvents (I think you must be referring to organic solvents, since water itself classifies as a solvent) are nothing to be afraid of, and do a fantastic job of cleaning bike parts.
Industrial solvents if you want to argue semantics. And yes, I do realize that water is also used as an industrial solvent. You know exactly what I mean.
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Old 05-02-18, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by pesty View Post
Industrial solvents if you want to argue semantics. And yes, I do realize that water is also used as an industrial solvent. You know exactly what I mean.
No, I chose "organic solvents" deliberately and specifically because the term "industrial solvents" is nebulous enough to be useless. (As you more or less indicated in your post.)

I love how chain lube discussions bring out the beast in people. We haven't even determined if the OP used WD-40 or not, but the gloves are on!
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Old 05-02-18, 11:50 AM
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If you used a water-based cleaner then it's quite possible the squeaking is caused by water contamination. I have not seen a good argument for using water-based cleaners on a chain.
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Old 05-02-18, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
I love how chain lube discussions bring out the beast in people. We haven't even determined if the OP used WD-40 or not, but the gloves are on!
There are remarkably few topics more polarizing on these forums than WD-40 and tubeless tires.
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Old 05-02-18, 01:34 PM
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it was Finish Line Citrus Degreaser i forgot to add
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Old 05-02-18, 03:49 PM
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Originally Posted by shine2000 View Post
so i just degressed my 7 speed bike chain(didnt take off chain) and cassette(or wheel) and made sure to clean the chain thoroughly with a rag and wash off excess off the chain and cassette.
i then lubed the chain and cassette and let it dry and with white lightning wax dry lube.the chain/cassete but i think mostly the chain i can hear squeeking noises.
should i apply some more lube?
......Might be due a new chain......
I have 2, one cleaned & ready to go
so I can R&R every few hundred miles
then
clean the one I took off,
soak in chain saw bar oil for a few days
wipe off & keep in a ziplock bag till next R&R
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Old 05-02-18, 07:29 PM
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So the consensus seems to be that whatever solvent (polar or non polar in basic understandings) be it needs to be removed form inside the chain or nasty things can happen (like rust or lack of lube getting inside the bushings/side plates). So how to do this solvent removal? Mechanical methods like whacking the wet chain against a bike box, blasting with compressed air or draining with gravity/absorbent wraps certainly reduce the amount of solvent inside but don't do a complete job. My experience suggests that evaporation is the only complete method. This takes time, reduced by both heat and air flow. But with water based solvents (soaps, citrus solvents and even water based "industrial" ones) time and heat equals the chance of rust forming quicker and deeper. I see this as the main reason to avoid water based solvents for items like chains that have their working surfaces hidden from the outside.

I'll add more reasons that I don't like water based solvents, at least in an "industrial" type setting. In a soak tank, often with a pumped/flow through a brush, that has water based solvents the oils removed from your parts tend to float on top of the surface of the solvent. When the part is removed from the tank this skim redeposits onto the surfaces you thought you were cleaning. So more wiping off/cleaning is needed once out of the tank. The two shop soak tanks I've used with water based solutions were very time consuming to actually get the part clean to standards that shops (and therefore their customers) have been use to for decades. The other issue is what to do with the used/contaminated solvent. It is marketed so strongly that a water based solvent is agreeable to just flush down the drains. And when the solvent (water based) is clean and has no dissolved oils I will agree. But once actually used that solvent is now containing what most every municipal water system will say is off limits, oils and greases. This irony I find especially sweet. Andy
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Old 05-02-18, 08:28 PM
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Assuming it is your chain making noise. It never hurts to attempt to add of the lube of your choice. The chain will only hold what can stick to it. The rest will fly off and you can wipe off any excess.
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Old 05-03-18, 05:03 AM
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I use Simple Green to clean, blow it dry with the air compressor, then lube, let sit, wipe off after 5 minutes. I commute 4-5 days 14 miles and a longer weekend ride of 35-50, so I do this as part of my after ride Sunday ritual.
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Old 05-03-18, 03:46 PM
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You did not clean the chain. You washed the dirt into the chain's pins and bushings shortening the chains life.
Chain care, wear and skipping by Jobst Brandt
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Old 05-03-18, 06:18 PM
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KMC makes some helpful guides too......

KMC Chain Maintenance Guide
CHAIN MAINTENANCE video

I do a lot less than this guy does and my chains still last many years and many thousands of miles.

Notice that the solvent is put on a rag, not applied to the chain directly. That said, I've sprayed my chains directly with WD40, still no premature failures. But seems more prudent to only apply solvent to rag, then wipe chain.

Likewise, lube is only applied to the roller. I've done this part naturally with no coaching since I was six yo.
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Old 05-04-18, 12:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
KMC makes some helpful guides too......

KMC Chain Maintenance Guide
CHAIN MAINTENANCE video

I do a lot less than this guy does and my chains still last many years and many thousands of miles.

Notice that the solvent is put on a rag, not applied to the chain directly. That said, I've sprayed my chains directly with WD40, still no premature failures. But seems more prudent to only apply solvent to rag, then wipe chain.

Likewise, lube is only applied to the roller. I've done this part naturally with no coaching since I was six yo.
Good advice for shorter chain life. They are selling chains after all.
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Old 05-06-18, 05:43 PM
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Rock N Roll Gold is what I like except in wet weather. It's a Teflon dry lubricant suspended in solvent. You squirt it on in with a pretty heavy stream and it washes the chain and leaves the lubricant behind. Wipe off with a rag and the chain is clean and lubed. I've never done anything to my chain except squirt this stuff on and wipe it off. The chain becomes quiet and the shifting smooth. It's might be more expensive than the generic lubes but it saves me a lot of messy work and solvent disposal concerns.
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