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48/36/26 with road shifters

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48/36/26 with road shifters

Old 05-02-18, 01:23 PM
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NeoY2k
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48/36/26 with road shifters

Hi,

I'm looking at building myself a new touring bike, this time with drop bars.
I thought MTB triples weren't compatible with road shifters, without a gizmo like the Jtek Shiftmate 7.
But then I saw that quite a few bikes came with 48/36/26 on despite being drop bars, with a Sora FD, and i doubt manufacturers would deal with pull adaptors.

Surly LHT comes standard in triple with an Andel square taper
https://surlybikes.com/bikes/long_ha...ker/bike_specs

Ridgeback has them on their Voyage, Panorama and Expedition, with Shimano square tapers and hollowtechs.
https://www.ridgeback.co.uk/bikes/touring/world/voyage

So do a few others. Are these specific crankset, or could I use my Deore 48/36/26 hollowtech on a bike with a 105 triple shifter and a sora FD?

On the same line, I used to tour on 26" flat bars with a 44/32/22 Deore hollowtech crankset. So going to 48/36/26 on 700x38c wheels is quite a gap, and seems a bit long to me for loaded touring on terrains such as the Alps.
Would the same setup (105 triple with Sora FD) work, or would the FD curvature not match the smaller crankset, then requiring me the use of an MTB FD with a shiftmate?

I know doubles are good, but I have parts lying around, and sub/compact cranksets and 105 shifters don't come cheap...

Thanks,
Nicolas
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Old 05-02-18, 02:39 PM
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Stick with the Road FD and it should be OK. ignore the curvature is not perfect.
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Old 05-02-18, 07:51 PM
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Some ATB cranks sets have a slightly greater ring to ring spacing then road cranks have. This change began in the 1990s as more demand for better off road front shifting was answered by the big S. The actual ring to ring spacing of whatever crank you are using is unknown till tried/measured or some spec typically buried deep in the crank manufacture's published specs is found.

The linked Surley uses friction ft shift lever so this issue is moot. The other does use a STI/indexed shift lever, however product managers don't have to deal with customers directly... Granted the dimensional differences can be slight but they can be enough to make worn or less then ideally adjusted systems be a pain. Andy
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Old 05-03-18, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Stick with the Road FD and it should be OK. ignore the curvature is not perfect.
Ditto. The mountain front der. has a different cable pull.
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Old 05-04-18, 05:30 PM
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FD Experience

I run a 50-38-24 on my recumbent using a 105 nine speed FD and SRAM X.9 twist shifters, and a 48-36-26 (9-speed) on my road bike using an IRD Alpina-D and Sora STI shifters, According to IRD's site, the Alpina-D "[w]ill work with standard road triple cranks, but it is optimized for smaller rings such as 48-36-24t or 50-36-30t." Have had excellent performance from both the FD's and shifters. Would post a direct link but haven't passed the minimum post threshold yet.
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Old 05-04-18, 09:51 PM
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Originally Posted by carthusian View Post
I run a 50-38-24 on my recumbent using a 105 nine speed FD and SRAM X.9 twist shifters, and a 48-36-26 (9-speed) on my road bike using an IRD Alpina-D and Sora STI shifters, According to IRD's site, the Alpina-D "[w]ill work with standard road triple cranks, but it is optimized for smaller rings such as 48-36-24t or 50-36-30t." Have had excellent performance from both the FD's and shifters. Would post a direct link but haven't passed the minimum post threshold yet.
Here's a link to one from my local shop:
https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...87&category=71
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Old 05-07-18, 07:40 AM
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One other potential 'gotcha' to be aware of: Mountain bike cranksets typically have wider chainline than road bike cranksets. Shimano's spec for chainline on road triples is 45 mm. Spec for mountain bikes is 47.5 to 50 mm. A road derailleur might not be able to swing out that wide. If your bike has a round seat tube and there isn't a braze-on tab in the way, SRAM makes a "wide spacing" adapter you can use with a braze-on road front derailleur to situate your derailleur outboard an extra few mm.

SRAM Wide Spacing Braze-On Adapter | Jenson USA
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Old 05-07-18, 08:53 AM
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Thank you very much for all this very valuable info!
Will try the IRD and if not enough will go to SRAM.

Thanks,
Nicolas
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Old 05-07-18, 10:37 AM
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Some bikes handle the pull problem by using bar end shifters which are not indexed.

Otherwise, road triples are all fairly consistent and itís more likely to work than not so long as theyíre all road parts. Theyíre not constantly playing w the ring spacing like on doubles. Just donít mix ages
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Old 05-14-18, 07:08 AM
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Thank you all.
I actually tried it with a Deore triple crankset. Worked perfectly.

With an XT MT800 bottom bracket I just had to put 2 spacers on the non-drive side and 1 on the drive side, instead of the contrary. Otherwise it couldn't reach the 3rd chainring. Worked perfect with the inverted spacers an old 105 front derailleur.

That said the result was so ugly that I ordered a Stronglight crankset!
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Old 05-15-18, 05:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
Here's a link to one from my local shop:
https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...87&category=71
Itís actually a Microshift derailleur.
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Old 05-15-18, 10:48 PM
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Originally Posted by cs1 View Post
Itís actually a Microshift derailleur.
Yes, several non-Shimano derailleurs and shifters are actually re-branded Microshift units. So?
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Old 05-16-18, 01:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
Yes, several non-Shimano derailleurs and shifters are actually re-branded Microshift units. So?
So, often you can buy the Microshift branded version for less. It was meant as an informative not insulting comment.
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Old 05-16-18, 04:12 AM
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The Surly LHT has an OEM road crankset, so the Sora FD can handle the chainline. Surly specs Ogres and Trolls with a Deore Trekking 48-36-26 crankset with an MTB chainline, so they are shifted by Deore derailleurs.

Sugino and maybe some others make a 48-36-26 road triple crankset which would work with a road derailleur and road shifters. Otherwise use a shiftmate or an MTB derailleur with a trekking crankset and a bar end/thumb/downtube shifter.
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Old 05-16-18, 12:45 PM
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A front derailer designed for 48/36/26 or 46/36/26 triples will best match the curvature. This includes most MTB front derailers from late 80s to early 90s. As others have said, though, curvature isn't that important to match perfectly.
But as long as you're using a bar-end front shifter, you don't need to worry about exact cable throw because the front shifter isn't indexed.
If you are switching to brake/shift levers then you'll need a road-group front derailer whose cable pull ratio matches the shifter.
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Old 05-17-18, 04:07 AM
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Originally Posted by cs1 View Post
Itís actually a Microshift derailleur.
From what I can see itís a Microshift FD-R730. Ebay is full of heavily discounted sellers. Good luck on the search.
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Old 07-18-18, 04:13 PM
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To me this IRD Alpina looks more like the Microshift FD-RD39 than the R730, thought specs don't match. Any other info? If I could buy the same part for less, sure I would, especially as I'd have to order the IRD overseas.
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Old 07-18-18, 09:59 PM
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left one, friction , is a cure..
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Old 07-19-18, 07:15 AM
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Running 46-39-30 road crank on my wife's road bike with a Tiagra 4503 FD. It is a 10 speed derailleur, but she is running 8 speed Claris brifters.

John
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Old 07-19-18, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
Some ATB cranks sets have a slightly greater ring to ring spacing then road cranks have. This change began in the 1990s as more demand for better off road front shifting was answered by the big S. The actual ring to ring spacing of whatever crank you are using is unknown till tried/measured or some spec typically buried deep in the crank manufacture's published specs is found.

The linked Surley uses friction ft shift lever so this issue is moot. The other does use a STI/indexed shift lever, however product managers don't have to deal with customers directly... Granted the dimensional differences can be slight but they can be enough to make worn or less then ideally adjusted systems be a pain. Andy
I somewhat disagree. In practice I haven't found there to be much difference between road and mountain cranks. I've used either a Shimano XT external bottom bracket crank (mid2000s) or a Race Face Turbine (late 1990s) microdrive BCD crank with 9 speed STI shifters on my touring bike since 2003 without any issues whatsoever. Shifts are flawless for roughly 10,000 miles. All bets are off for anything after 9 speed although I'm fairly certain that a 10 speed STI would still work but I haven't tried it.
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Old 07-19-18, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by NeoY2k View Post
Thank you all.
I actually tried it with a Deore triple crankset. Worked perfectly.

With an XT MT800 bottom bracket I just had to put 2 spacers on the non-drive side and 1 on the drive side, instead of the contrary. Otherwise it couldn't reach the 3rd chainring. Worked perfect with the inverted spacers an old 105 front derailleur.
Yup. Mountain bike cranks use a shorter spindle than road bikes in nearly all cases I've run across.

Additionally, go with the cheaper Shimano front derailers over their more expensive models. They work better for triples then their more expensive cousins. The Alpina works okay but it has a long tail which might hit the chain stay. The MicroShift works quite well and is cheap.
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Last edited by cyccommute; 07-19-18 at 08:49 AM.
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Old 07-23-18, 02:45 AM
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Thanks. So far so good. The poor shifting on the new chainset was due to the crappy ramp/pin on stock Stronglight rings. Replaced with Spa Cycles ones, shift is flawless. Will see how it goes on the other bike, ordered some Specialites TA middle chainring, should be sufficient.
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