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BULLETPROOF BICYCLE BUILD - frame

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BULLETPROOF BICYCLE BUILD - frame

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Old 07-03-18, 02:30 AM
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krecik
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BULLETPROOF BICYCLE BUILD - frame

Hello! Sorry for the obnoxious title in caps!

As part of the summer break from college, I decided to build byself a bulletproof commuter bike before going into work. By buletproof I mean one that is decluttered, requires little maintenance and can take a beating. I plan on using a steel road bike frame. You can get them second hand off eBay for under £30. Though I like the overall aesthetic of it, they look rather flimsy. I want to know if there is any posibility of it breaking? Has anyone ever snapped a steel road bike frame when jumping off curbs (I kno ur not supposed to do that) for example?

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Old 07-03-18, 03:54 AM
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Look made a Kevlar composite frame.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Carbon-and-...6/332619721509

Ok...
I don't think I've broken a steel frame, but there have been plenty of examples posted of steel frames breaking dropouts, bottom brackets, and crash damage causing smashed forks and headtubes, and perhaps secondary cracks due to previous crash damage.

A good steel frame may well be durable, but not indestructible.

If you're doing a lot of curb jumping, look at MTBs with high volume tires. You can install drop bars on it if you wish. And, it should be reasonably efficient with very high quality tires such as Compass tires.

Or, you could look at Cyclocross bikes (or hybrids converted to road). Again with decent tires and appropriate gearing.

I wouldn't be so stuck on frame material, rather look for something durable in the price range you wish. Perhaps Aluminum or Steel. But, don't forget Carbon Fiber.
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Old 07-03-18, 04:19 AM
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As noted above, frames do not have to break to become unrideable, and It's much easier to avoid abusive riding than to obtain a "bulletproof" frame. It's not difficult at all to learn to curb-jump either up or down, as well as to "float" over potholes, with very little stress on frame or wheels. Sure, it's possible for a steel frame to fail. It's possible for a crank arm to fall off, or a rim to get a flat spot from impact. That's not a reason to weld on a crank arm or to get a fat tire bike.
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Old 07-03-18, 05:32 AM
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Thin walled superlight frames aren't bombproof. But a cheap, low end steel frames tend to be very durable. Although heavy.
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Old 07-03-18, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by krecik View Post
. . . I want to know if there is any posibility of it breaking? Has anyone ever snapped a steel road bike frame when jumping off curbs . . .
Yes it's possible even with thick steel. Yes, it has actually happened.
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Old 07-03-18, 12:40 PM
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not in £ land...

Even the old flash-welded Chicago Schwinns didn't survive collisions..
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Old 07-03-18, 12:42 PM
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If you make a truly bullet proof bike, then you will find it very disappointing to ride.
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Old 07-03-18, 12:45 PM
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90's MTB frames are pretty ubiquitous, cheap and fairly hardy frames. 26" wheels are stronger as well. Throw on an old 3-speed sturmey archer wheelset with coaster brake and you'd be sitting pretty.
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Old 07-03-18, 01:10 PM
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Thanks for all the input! I think I'll go with a steel frame and minimise my abuse.

As some of you pointed out, no frame is totally bulletproof, if you're a monkey, you can break anything.
I guess I meant bulletproof more along the lines of 'as bulletproof as possible'.
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Old 07-03-18, 01:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
If you make a truly bullet proof bike, then you will find it very disappointing to ride.
Why do you think so?
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Old 07-03-18, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by zze86 View Post
90's MTB frames are pretty ubiquitous, cheap and fairly hardy frames. 26" wheels are stronger as well. Throw on an old 3-speed sturmey archer wheelset with coaster brake and you'd be sitting pretty.
You sir are a mind reader. How did you know I wanted a coaster brake? I guess 'decluttered' gave it away in my first post.
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Old 07-03-18, 01:19 PM
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Odds favor, a £30. bike likely weighs over 30 pounds ...14+ KG.
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Old 07-03-18, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Odds favor, a £30. bike likely weighs over 30 pounds ...14+ KG.
Not a problem. My 17 kg 3-speeds take over mamils on carbon all the time. With a backpack on the rear rack. And a 2kg chain lock. On hills.
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Old 07-03-18, 04:05 PM
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If I were going to build a bulletproof bike I'd start with a 90's GT triple triangle mountain bike frame. I can't imagine anything more durable for the cost. Find an early 90's Karakoram with a 1-1/8 headset and rigid fork and you are set.
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Old 07-03-18, 04:47 PM
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Don't forget the wheels......for durable go 32 spokes.....

and simple can be a 1xN set up with thumbshifters.

Personally for a commuted I want front and rear brakes
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Old 07-03-18, 06:26 PM
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You can probably find what you need already built at the local pawn shops near the school (or any nearby large one a month before school resumes). Save work and call them first.
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Old 07-03-18, 06:48 PM
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Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
Don't forget the wheels......for durable go 32 spokes.....

and simple can be a 1xN set up with thumbshifters.

Personally for a commuted I want front and rear brakes
36 has fallen out of favor, but I'd probably select a newer rim (last 20 years or so), and 36 spokes if the goal was to abuse the bike.

Perhaps even more spokes in some situations. The vintage Sturmey Archer hubs are also available in 40h and 48h, I think.
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Old 07-04-18, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by krecik View Post
You sir are a mind reader. How did you know I wanted a coaster brake? I guess 'decluttered' gave it away in my first post.
If you are planning on using a coaster brake, you will need horizontal dropouts to get correct chain tension
This effectively rules out any frame with vertical dropouts. You cannot use a chain tensioner with a coaster brake

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Old 07-04-18, 01:21 PM
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I guess I meant bulletproof more along the lines of 'as bulletproof as possible'.
A bit more realistic, given the existence of DU Anti Tank Bullets.
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Old 07-04-18, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
If you are planning on using a coaster brake, you will need horizontal dropouts to get correct chain tension
^ You need to take note of this.

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Old 07-04-18, 08:48 PM
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I confidently jump off curbs with my old steel road bike frame, a 1985 Schwinn Traveler, retrofitted as a single speed with coaster brake. My daily commute involves one curb hop. The Traveler was a low-to-mid grade bike in Schwinn's range. The whole bike weighs 22 pounds.

Perhaps even more important than the frame are the wheels. A properly tensioned wheel will last longer under mildly abusive conditions. And, curb-hopping technique plays a role. I wouldn't just bash into a curb on any bike.
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Old 07-04-18, 09:52 PM
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Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
Don't forget the wheels......for durable go 32 spokes.....
36 is even better! I make all my touring/errand/commuting wheels with 36 spokes. I know that rims are stronger now than they were back in the 70s and 80s when I got used to 36 spokes as standard, but the extra strength is just that much nicer.
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Old 07-05-18, 12:45 AM
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
If you are planning on using a coaster brake, you will need horizontal dropouts to get correct chain tension
This effectively rules out any frame with vertical dropouts. You cannot use a chain tensioner with a coaster brake
Yh, that would make sense. Though I haven't seen any second hand frames with horizontal dropouts, I have seen ones with diagonal ones, sort of like a forward slash: \. Those ones should be okay since I'm getting a new chain with it anyway so I'll be able to remove links as necessary.
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Old 07-05-18, 12:51 AM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
A bit more realistic, given the existence of DU Anti Tank Bullets.
Yh

I suppose the statement should be updated to "as bulletproof as possible for a road bike".
I'm starting to see what @Iride01 was getting at.
Being bulletproof is nice and all but it compromises efficiency, speed, weight etc. It would be heavy, clunky, and indeed, a disapointment to ride.
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Old 07-05-18, 12:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
I confidently jump off curbs with my old steel road bike frame, a 1985 Schwinn Traveler, retrofitted as a single speed with coaster brake. My daily commute involves one curb hop. The Traveler was a low-to-mid grade bike in Schwinn's range. The whole bike weighs 22 pounds.

Perhaps even more important than the frame are the wheels. A properly tensioned wheel will last longer under mildly abusive conditions. And, curb-hopping technique plays a role. I wouldn't just bash into a curb on any bike.
Cool!

You're riding the bike I want to make!
I suppose the cool thing about single speed, coaster braked is that it's like a fixie with the advantage of coasting without compromising the purity or safety of the bike at the same time.

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