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Aluminum rim worth the premium?

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Aluminum rim worth the premium?

Old 07-30-18, 01:26 PM
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It's ridiculous that Amazon does not allow you to ask the seller a question before you buy the item!
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Old 07-30-18, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
It's ridiculous that Amazon does not allow you to ask the seller a question before you buy the item!
How is that ridiculous? People go to Amazon because having to talk to a live human being and get suggestions about products is scary to them. Jeff Bezos likes to remove the human element from buying products especially when it comes to his employees who are treated like crap rather than like humans. If you could ask questions to a seller then you would find out half those products are crap and Jeffy doesn't make billions for himself.
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Old 07-30-18, 02:11 PM
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There were thousands of Peugeot UO-8s with steel rims. The young men riding them lived to become adults because 1) the rims were dimples to improve wet weather braking and 2) (much more important) those bike came with one of the all time great caliper brakes. Stopping power in the rain was still bad.

If you plan to tour, you might think seriously about the worst hill you will ever ride down in the wet. A couple hundred dollars might look really cheap/

Ben
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Old 07-31-18, 01:55 PM
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Be sure the hub is compatible with your shifter.
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Old 07-31-18, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
It's ridiculous that Amazon does not allow you to ask the seller a question before you buy the item!
Then don't buy it.

When all you want is cheaper, you sacrifice that .

A neighborhood bike shop, OTOH, provides service before and after the sale..
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Old 07-31-18, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Be sure the hub is compatible with your shifter.
I thought all 3-spd Sturmey shifters have the same pull. No?
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Old 07-31-18, 02:56 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
I thought all 3-spd Sturmey shifters have the same pull. No?
Yes I believe so. In your previous post, you didn't say it's Sturmey Archer. So you will be good to go.

Aluminum is worth it, definitely. $100 is much too high for a steel-rimmed wheel.

Used AW hubs go for $25. A CR-18 rim is about $40. I don't know what coaster brake 3-speed hubs go for.
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Old 07-31-18, 03:52 PM
  #33  
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Okay, total moron question: If steel rims are so bad at braking, how come disc rotors are made out of steel? Is it down to the difference in pad materials or the amount of force applied by the caliper? Or is it one of those problems that would be fixable, but nobody bothers since steel rims have been so completely superseded by more approrpriate materials (lighter, stiffer) anyway?
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Old 07-31-18, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Metaluna View Post
Okay, total moron question: If steel rims are so bad at braking, how come disc rotors are made out of steel? Is it down to the difference in pad materials or the amount of force applied by the caliper? Or is it one of those problems that would be fixable, but nobody bothers since steel rims have been so completely superseded by more approrpriate materials (lighter, stiffer) anyway?


I notice disc rotors on my car rusts very badly...it's okay for rotors to rust.

But the rims that rust would be very bad. Steel rims are made to be shiny like chrome, so doesn't rust.

So you have two problems, but you can only solve one but not both.
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Old 07-31-18, 04:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Metaluna View Post
Okay, total moron question: If steel rims are so bad at braking, how come disc rotors are made out of steel? Is it down to the difference in pad materials or the amount of force applied by the caliper? Or is it one of those problems that would be fixable, but nobody bothers since steel rims have been so completely superseded by more approrpriate materials (lighter, stiffer) anyway?
That's not a moron question at all. There are a lot of differences. First, I'm sure that disc rotors are not chromed. Chrome is slipperier than other kinds of steel. Second, yes, there is a lot more force from disc calipers, but some of that is lost in the lower leverage discs have since they are so much smaller in diameter than rims. Third, the pad compound is probably very different. I may be wrong, but I think pads on disc brakes are made of a metal mixture, not rubber.
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Old 07-31-18, 04:03 PM
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And I imagine the rotor wears out quickly...but that's okay...you just pop out the old rotor and pop a new one back in.

Can't do that with a rim...rims are very expensive and labor intensive to replace.
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Old 07-31-18, 04:25 PM
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Yes, that's an advantage to disc brakes. Rebuilding a wheel is so labor intensive that it usually makes more sense to replace an entire wheel. Not for me, though, as I build my own wheels.
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Old 07-31-18, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Then don't buy it.

When all you want is cheaper, you sacrifice that .

A neighborhood bike shop, OTOH, provides service before and after the sale..
+10 People tend to want the low prices Amazon charges but with the local service. There is a reason Amazon can sell stuff so cheap. One is you get zero personal service. Returns can be a hassle too! I bought two of the same item once from Amazon. Return shipping cost me 90% of what I paid for the item. My mistake, but still....

On line works best when you know EXACTLY what you want.
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Old 07-31-18, 06:02 PM
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I'm riding old Sturmey archer hubs on aluminum rims. What a pleasure! One is built per @noglider's specs: Second hand AW hub, CR18 rim, stainless spokes. You will almost 100% likely need washers under the spoke heads. Don't just consider cost -- a bike with truly nice wheels, and such a nice hub, is just... better. That is, if you like those hubs, which you can guess I do from my avatar picture.

It's been many years since I rode steel rims. My recollection is that dry-weather braking was good enough that it wasn't dangerous, but in wet weather, stopping power went to zero. One possible difference with disc brakes is that even in wet weather, the heat generated by braking, and lack of gap between pad and disc, probably drives the water off very quickly. But also, unless anybody knows the precise physics and chemistry of the rim / water / pad interaction the best answer might be "don't know why, but I know it works."
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Old 07-31-18, 06:57 PM
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@Gresp15C: !
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Old 08-01-18, 07:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
I'm riding old Sturmey archer hubs on aluminum rims. What a pleasure! One is built per @noglider's specs: Second hand AW hub, CR18 rim, stainless spokes. You will almost 100% likely need washers under the spoke heads. Don't just consider cost -- a bike with truly nice wheels, and such a nice hub, is just... better. That is, if you like those hubs, which you can guess I do from my avatar picture.
Where do you buy used AW hub that is good? I've seen many on Ebay...but the $25 ones look really dirty and grimey. The $50 ones look better.

Did you used garden varity washers for the spoke?

Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Used AW hub $25.

Last edited by mtb_addict; 08-01-18 at 07:56 AM.
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Old 08-01-18, 08:04 AM
  #42  
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I didn't use washers for the wheels I built. @Gresp15C can tell you about his washers.

I haven't bought an AW hub off ebay, but if I did, I wouldn't let the dirt bother me. I've worked on a ton of AW hubs, as I used to be a shop mechanic. Most of them did not need disassembly, and those that did ended up working fine after reassembly. I've never had a failed AW hub, believe it or not, though I know they do fail sometimes.

But are you really looking for an AW hub? I thought you have a coaster brake hub, S3C or TCW.

By the way, where are you? Your profile doesn't list your location.
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Old 08-01-18, 08:29 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
But are you really looking for an AW hub? I thought you have a coaster brake hub, S3C or TCW.

By the way, where are you? Your profile doesn't list your location.
Yes, I'm thinking of switching from AWC coaster to AW (without the coaster brake).
I don't really like the AWC...it works fine so far but feels clunky...like something is about to break any moment.
And the AWC doesn't have the oil port.
I like to convert to AW with oil port.

Texas Gulf Coast...
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Old 08-01-18, 08:42 AM
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Cool. I think you can't go wrong with an AW. You also can't go wrong with one of SA's new hubs.

I know the AW so well, I can adjust one with my eyes closed, using feel and sound. Seriously.
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Old 08-01-18, 09:42 AM
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Don't need to add an oil port , oil goes where it needs be, thru the hollow drive side axle end,

just unscrew, take the gear shifting chain out, lay the bike on it's side and use that hole.

screw the indicator chain back in , reattach the cable and .. done..


Washers, brass, on spoke hook side , make up for steel hub flanges being thinner,
now , spokes are bent for thicker alloy hub flanges,

newer alloy 3 speed hub shells don't need them ..

New 3 speed hub (BSR, in my Brompton ) works a lot easier,
with their newer shift lever,

than the old one [94] with the steel trigger shifter..





..

Last edited by fietsbob; 08-01-18 at 09:52 AM.
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Old 08-01-18, 10:02 AM
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I don't consider aluminum rims to have a "premium". Chromed steel rims are cheap **** that we shouldn't have to bother with ever.
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Old 08-01-18, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Don't need to add an oil port , oil goes where it needs be, thru the hollow drive side axle end,
just unscrew, take the gear shifting chain out, lay the bike on it's side and use that hole.
screw the indicator chain back in , reattach the cable and .. done..

\

..
I find that putting oil thru the hollow axle requires me to remove the axle nut first...because it is dirty...I don't want dirt to go into the hub.
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Old 08-01-18, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
I don't consider aluminum rims to have a "premium". Chromed steel rims are cheap **** that we shouldn't have to bother with ever.
But chrome looks classier. Bright and shiny!
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Old 08-01-18, 10:49 AM
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Until it Rusts...

Get a Drum brake 3 speed, then you wont rely
on the rim's faces for braking , or a coaster brake,
if you defend steel rims in spite of, now, being educated.



...

Last edited by fietsbob; 08-01-18 at 10:53 AM.
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Old 08-01-18, 10:57 AM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
I find that putting oil thru the hollow axle requires me to remove the axle nut first...because it is dirty...I don't want dirt to go into the hub.
you might clean the bike first, Eh? seems cognitive dissonance

like the aesthetics of chrome , but let the bike stay grimy ..
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