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Adapting 130mm hub for 126mm frame

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Adapting 130mm hub for 126mm frame

Old 08-08-18, 11:40 AM
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Adapting 130mm hub for 126mm frame

I have a '92ish Specialized Allez carbon framed, aluminum lugged road bike with full Shimano 600 group set. Rear hub finally seen it's last days.(7 sp free hub).
I'm planning on adapting a 130mm hub to fit the spacing. Reading numerous posts this seems to be my best option.
My question is: Would it be easier to adapt a sealed bearing hub or a cup and cone type? And, are most hubs the same width? I'm assuming they all have spacers.
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Old 08-08-18, 11:53 AM
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You will need to adapt your frame, not the hub. A 126mm rear triangle can easily be cold set to 130 so that a new hub can easily slide in.

(Edit) Ah, a carbon frame. Nope, can’t cold set. (I apologize; I have steel frames on the brain.) You will need to find another 126mm hub or rebuild the old one. What is wearing out on the existing hub?
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Old 08-08-18, 12:06 PM
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What is wearing out on the existing hub?
Cups and cones worn, Free hub itself worn, plus brake surface on rims worn concave. I kept the wheel going as long as I could.
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Old 08-08-18, 12:24 PM
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Hmmm. I looked further and it seems that your options are a used 126 hub or (indeed) shortening a 130. It appears that you would need to use a bunch of washers or spacers to replace an existing spacer, and then cut the axle. 126mm freehub puzzle

Were you planning on buying an entire wheel or having it built with your chosen parts?
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Old 08-08-18, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by nhahn
My question is: Would it be easier to adapt a sealed bearing hub or a cup and cone type? And, are most hubs the same width? I'm assuming they all have spacers.
Thanks for the clear direct question. I'd first look for a hub with spacers that can be adjusted; type of bearings would be a secondary concern.
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Old 08-08-18, 12:51 PM
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Freewheel hubs are quite adaptable.. you take off a spacer from the left axle end, making it 4mm thinner
and increase the dish a bit , to recenter the rim..
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Old 08-08-18, 01:14 PM
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Get an 8-10 speed cup and cone wheel, remove some spacers and redish wheel. You probably will need to shorten the axle also unless you have really beefy dropouts.
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Old 08-08-18, 01:32 PM
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If your bike is still 7-speed you will have to get a 4.5 mm spacer to use a 7-speed cassette on most 130 mm hubs as these are almost universally fitted with 8/9/10-speed freehub bodies. Also, resetting a 130 mm hub to 126 mm will require removing 4 mm of spacers from the non-drive side, shortening the axle and redishing the rim. The resulting wheel will have more dish than it did before and be, theoretically, somewhat weaker.

If you can find a decent one, it would be easier to just get a new 126 mm 7-speed freehub complete wheel.
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Old 08-08-18, 01:59 PM
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The problem with a 130mm hub is that if you remove 4mm of spacing from the NDS to fit, you'll have a wheel with severe dish.
Much of that can be compensated for if you use an offset rim. Since you need a new rim anyway.

I'd be looking for another 7 speed hub/wheel to cannibalize.
Most? the early 8 speed FH's mounted exactly like the 7 speed and were thus interchangeable.

Some hubs have better CTF's than others, regarding dish. Researching that, and plugging your numbers into SpokeCalc can give you a better idea of tension balances etc.
Severely dished wheels are more likely to have inadequate NDS spoke tension. Anything you can do to reduce dish is good.
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Old 08-08-18, 02:07 PM
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Hate to say it, but reverting to a freewheel may be the easiest solution. Decent 126 mm freewheel hubs are not hard to find.
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Old 08-08-18, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by desconhecido
Hate to say it, but reverting to a freewheel may be the easiest solution. Decent 126 mm freewheel hubs are not hard to find.
I have a couple of Sansin Classica freewheel hubs that are 126mm, cartridge bearing; that I was fortunate to spot on Amazon. I have plans for only one, IM if you want one, appears to be NOS, including original box.

Additional suggestions:
https://velo-orange.com/products/gra...heel-hub-126mm
Origin8 RD 1100 hub, it is 130mm, but I believe that there is enough NDS spacer to modify it to 126mm.
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Old 08-08-18, 07:01 PM
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Probably the definitive thread on putting 10 speeds in 126mm dropouts.

10-speeds on a 126mm hub SUCCESS

I'm going to try this with Dura Ace 7700 hubs to fit into an older Cannondale Criterium frame. I figure if I can get to around 127/8mm it will spread just enough to work. I have the wheels, but my 7 speed Sachs Aris freewheel is not giving up the ghost and with Suntour Superbe Pro hubs it may take a long time before they wear out... almost 20 years and counting... lol!

John
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Old 08-09-18, 06:33 AM
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Thank you all for the tips.
Looks like removing spacers and re-dishing is the way to go. Unless I come across a 126mm hub. I'm not overly concerned about excessive wheel dish as this is my back-up/winter bike.
126mm freewheel also looks like a cheap way to go.
Nathan

Any tips on re-dishing? I'm willing to attempt this on my own.
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Old 08-09-18, 09:26 AM
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If you are going to build a wheel this would work..https://www.ebay.com/itm/SHIMANO-105....c100009.m1982
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Old 08-09-18, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by nhahn
Thank you all for the tips.
Looks like removing spacers and re-dishing is the way to go. Unless I come across a 126mm hub. I'm not overly concerned about excessive wheel dish as this is my back-up/winter bike.
126mm freewheel also looks like a cheap way to go.
Nathan

Any tips on re-dishing? I'm willing to attempt this on my own.
Why bother with removing spacers and making a weak wheel? Should be able to just squeeze a 130mm hub in.

Of course, like @davidad, my preference is just to locate good used 126mm cassette hubs and build my own wheels.
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Old 08-09-18, 10:04 PM
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Originally Posted by nhahn
......Any tips on re-dishing? I'm willing to attempt this on my own.
You'll have very minimal effect by tightening the DS spokes. Most of your change will be from loosening NDS spokes.
That's the downside in that they often end up with insufficient tension even when jacking up the DS tension.
That's where an offset spoke bed rim can turn an "iffy" wheel into something more dependable/strong.

And use some kind of "soft" thread locker on the NDS spokes.
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Old 04-19-19, 11:13 AM
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https://www.ebay.com/itm/MAVIC-MA-40...-/163630339301

If the hub is in good condition with proper service it will last forever.
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