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SRAM Apex HydroR adjustment

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SRAM Apex HydroR adjustment

Old 08-11-18, 02:15 AM
  #1  
Rest_assured
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SRAM Apex HydroR adjustment

Hi all,
I have today purchased my first road bike with hydro disc brakes. It is a Cannondale Slate Apex1 running 1x11.
Being a pedant, I need to find a way to make sure that both brake levers start braking with the same amount of pull. the left (no shift, just brake) brakes almost immediately, but the right has a bit of 'slack'.
I have fiddled a bit with the Reach Adjustment, but that doesn't seem to affect the amount of pull needed for the pads to hit the rotors.
Any suggestions?
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Old 08-11-18, 09:58 PM
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In general the rear brake will feel a little softer because there is more cable housing to expand slightly under braking, similar how running a cable actuated brake through full brake housing makes it feel a little softer. It's possible that the rear is bled worse than the front. If the bite point is pretty firm, and the pads have plenty of room around the rotor now, you can try removing the wheel and rotor and very, very slightly advance the pistons by pulling on the brake. If you go overboard the brake will rub the rotor and or you won't be able to insert it--if so spread the pads out all the way, reinstall the wheel, and advance them back up with the rotor installed.

It's also possible that the front has too much fluid in the system or the pads are over advanced. I'd try spreading the front pads apart and then reinstalling the wheel and advancing the pads back again. If the pistons don't retract fully you can open the lever bleed port, put a rag over it, and push the pads out.
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Old 08-12-18, 12:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Rest_assured View Post
the left (no shift, just brake) brakes almost immediately, but the right has a bit of 'slack'.
Originally Posted by cpach View Post
In general the rear brake will feel a little softer because there is more cable housing to expand slightly under braking.
The OP is from Australia, the left brake is usually the rear, the right brake usually is the front.

Last edited by cobba; 08-12-18 at 12:31 AM.
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Old 08-12-18, 12:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Rest_unassured View Post
. . . Being a pedant, I need to find a way to make sure . . .
Did you review the servicing documentation from the manufacturer?
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Old 08-12-18, 01:08 PM
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork View Post
Did you review the servicing documentation from the manufacturer?
AKA; RTFM.
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Old 08-12-18, 02:37 PM
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Having both hand brakes actuate with the same amount of brake lever actuation on a bicycle is not necessarily a good thing. As long as you know which lever actuates the the brake on which wheel, you can train yourself how to brake most effectively. The amount of pull that you have before your brake takes effect is an important indicator to you about which one works best in a particular situation.. The faster you have to stop, the more important your front brake will be. Under full emergency braking, the help that your rear brake provides can diminish to almost zero. Unless there is an underlining mechanical problem with your brakes, it is not a bad thing that your front and rear brakes feel different
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Old 08-12-18, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
Having both hand brakes actuate with the same amount of brake lever actuation on a bicycle is not necessarily a good thing. As long as you know which lever actuates the the brake on which wheel, you can train yourself how to brake most effectively. The amount of pull that you have before your brake takes effect is an important indicator to you about which one works best in a particular situation.. The faster you have to stop, the more important your front brake will be. Under full emergency braking, the help that your rear brake provides can diminish to almost zero. Unless there is an underlining mechanical problem with your brakes, it is not a bad thing that your front and rear brakes feel different
The OP knows all that; they claim to be a pedant but is actually just obsessive.

To the OP: ride a lot more and stop obsessing over nonsense. The exercise will balance your brain chemicals and you'll feel much better. You may even find a worthwhile personal relationship. Good luck. =)
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Old 08-12-18, 06:53 PM
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork View Post
Did you review the servicing documentation from the manufacturer?
Sure did. I have found extensive info on how to change the SRAM reach adjustment, but that doesn't affect the bite point.
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Old 08-12-18, 06:54 PM
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Originally Posted by AnkleWork View Post

To the OP: ride a lot more and stop obsessing over nonsense. The exercise will balance your brain chemicals and you'll feel much better. You may even find a worthwhile personal relationship. Good luck. =)
Says the *****y guy on the forum
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Old 08-12-18, 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by cpach View Post
In general the rear brake will feel a little softer because there is more cable housing to expand slightly under braking, similar how running a cable actuated brake through full brake housing makes it feel a little softer. It's possible that the rear is bled worse than the front. If the bite point is pretty firm, and the pads have plenty of room around the rotor now, you can try removing the wheel and rotor and very, very slightly advance the pistons by pulling on the brake. If you go overboard the brake will rub the rotor and or you won't be able to insert it--if so spread the pads out all the way, reinstall the wheel, and advance them back up with the rotor installed.

It's also possible that the front has too much fluid in the system or the pads are over advanced. I'd try spreading the front pads apart and then reinstalling the wheel and advancing the pads back again. If the pistons don't retract fully you can open the lever bleed port, put a rag over it, and push the pads out.
I would like to offer my genuine thanks for your help. I will have a fiddle when I get home tonight.
Cheers
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